or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Holiday iPhone sales projected to reach 46.5M as pundits 'underestimate' Apple
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Holiday iPhone sales projected to reach 46.5M as pundits 'underestimate' Apple

post #1 of 48
Thread Starter 
Tech pundits who find the iPhone 5 "boring" are not expected to be in agreement with consumers, who are expected to buy a record 46.5 million iPhones this holiday shopping season.

Analyst Shaw Wu with Sterne Agee raised his December quarter forecast for iPhone sales by 500,000 units in a note to investors on Monday. He believes Apple could sell even more than 46.5 million units, but he has heard from sources in Apple's supply chain that company may face production constraints of the iPhone 5 due to its use of new in-cell touch panels.

Wu expects record shattering iPhone 5 sales as he views the product as a "significant update" that "will drive a powerful product cycle." That's in contrast to some in the press who have panned the iPhone 5 as "disappointing" and a "minor" update.

In Wu's view, those who do not think Apple's latest handset will be a success "underestimate" the iPhone 5. He thinks the device will place a great deal of pressure on competitors, and will help Apple capture customers who may have otherwise purchased an Android or Windows phone with a larger screen or 4G LTE connectivity.

With iPhone sales forecast to reach 46.5 million in the December quarter, Apple is expected to set a new record for iPhone sales in the holiday shopping season. The company's previous best quarter came at the end of 2011, when Apple sold a record 37 million iPhones.

>iPhone 5


As for the current quarter, which concludes at the end of the month, Wu believes Apple will sell a total of 27 million iPhones. Sales will be helped by the iPhone 5, which debuts in 9 countries this Friday, and 22 more the following week, before the quarter ends on Sept. 29.

Apple announced on Monday that the iPhone 5 has had the strongest start of any of the company's products to date. A total of 2 million preorders were placed in the first 24 hours, and Apple has sold out of launch day availability.
post #2 of 48

No doubt they could sell 46.5 million. Will they be able to MAKE 46.5 million in that time?

I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
Reply
I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
Reply
post #3 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

No doubt they could sell 46.5 million. Will they be able to MAKE 46.5 million in that time?

I'd think by now we should be able to get a fairly accurate equation to figure out sales based on historical data. If they really did double their first 24 hour pre-orders does that equate to doubling their quarterly sales?

Any math people want to take a swing at it?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #4 of 48
A minor update? The pundits must be looking at the iPhone 5 with their brains shut down. Hardware wise, the iPhone 5 is a significant upgrade: A6, new Qualcomm chips (LTE), new touchscreen technology, new size, new manufacturing process, new camera, possibly significant speed enhancement, new suppliers.

Then there's the significant changes going from ios 5 to iOS 6. Many features will be backward compatible, of course, but still significant.

The changes made for the iPhone 5 will allow for future developments in the iPhone line, and one should expect to see these changes coming to the iPad, and iPad mini, if rumors are to be believed.

In all, the iPhone 5 updates are significant by any reasonable measure.
post #5 of 48
Last year in the holiday quarter, Apple sold 37MM. The 46.5% is only 26% above last year. That % increase is ridiculously low

These analysts by and large have their heads up their ass. Their price targets will continue to be behind and be chasing the stock.

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

Reply

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

Reply
post #6 of 48
The analysts pretty much get it wrong every time. Lets see. The iPod will never sell for the premium price over other MP3s. The iPhone will never make it in an established phone market of Nokia and Motorola phones. The iPad is just a big iPhone and it will never sell because it doesn't have a full OS like PC tablets. The iMac looks like a toy and doesn't ahve a floppy so it won't change the world of computers forever. The Macbook Air is too expensive and has no optical drive. Then look at every revision of each product and the analysts always say there are minor revisions and these things are boring and they won't sell.
I can't think of a single time when the early tech analysts have been right about a single apple product.
Except when they said the Cube wouldn't sell. It was actually really cool and revolutionary but there was not a big market for it.
post #7 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

A minor update? The pundits must be looking at the iPhone 5 with their brains shut down. Hardware wise, the iPhone 5 is a significant upgrade: A6, new Qualcomm chips (LTE), new touchscreen technology, new size, new manufacturing process, new camera, possibly significant speed enhancement, new suppliers.
Then there's the significant changes going from ios 5 to iOS 6. Many features will be backward compatible, of course, but still significant.
The changes made for the iPhone 5 will allow for future developments in the iPhone line, and one should expect to see these changes coming to the iPad, and iPad mini, if rumors are to be believed.
In all, the iPhone 5 updates are significant by any reasonable measure.

I think they don't look at the new feature list. Phone aesthetics from any brand aren't changing much lately. Apple doesn't change their computer designs half as often and that hasn't been a problem.

Whether or not pundits like it doesn't matter, they can try to guide or divine public opinion but they aren't the final say. What really matters is whether the buyers and stock holders think it's a worthy update.
post #8 of 48
46.5M over 13 weeks = 3.5Million a week (500K a day 21,000 an hour).

I think the only thing that would impact this is the iPad mini in the <400 range, as that would muddy the purchase dollars ("Do I buy a new phone, or use the old phone and buy an iPad Mini?"). Assuming it will have a lower Profit (per unit, the gross margin% may be the same), that would lower the earnings for the quarter. But for apple, it's a problem I think they would love to have (my intuition is those that buy and iPad are likely 'upgraders'(got an iPhone, waiting for a smaller iPad)... those that buy a iPhone are likely 'switchers')
post #9 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

No doubt they could sell 46.5 million. Will they be able to MAKE 46.5 million in that time?

 

Their manufacturing costs have almost doubled in the run up to the iPhone 5 and that has been historically linked to the number of iPhones they sell. So, if anything, 46.5 million is conservative.

post #10 of 48
I just wish someone would go back to all these analysis who keep making the doom and gloom predictions and ask them why they are continual wrong and why should anyone listen to them. May a example of these people and make the justify their failure to understand.

I get that some people may have miss the bigger picture which happen with the whole itune/ipod/iphone ecosystem first took hold, but today, they fail to factor the entire ecosystem and ease of use into the over all picture. Yes their are plenty of products on the market when you go down their check list have more features or maybe a few newer technologies but consumer finally realize long feature lists does not mean a better product.
post #11 of 48

The iPhone 5 is amazing. Problem is:

 

1. There are too many tech writers/sites trying to grab headlines and most of them are full of &*^%

2. We are generally spoiled in our expectations despite technology moving at an ever increasing rate, it's still not fast enough.

3. We want to be wowed, but we peek under the wrapper before Christmas.  The pre-release product leaks for Apple products generates a lot of interest, and b/c of this there is a lot of incentive for sites to find and report them to generate site hits.  The amazing thing is they've really gotten good at hitting the mark.

post #12 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

A minor update? The pundits must be looking at the iPhone 5 with their brains shut down. Hardware wise, the iPhone 5 is a significant upgrade: A6, new Qualcomm chips (LTE), new touchscreen technology, new size, new manufacturing process, new camera, possibly significant speed enhancement, new suppliers.
Then there's the significant changes going from ios 5 to iOS 6. Many features will be backward compatible, of course, but still significant.
The changes made for the iPhone 5 will allow for future developments in the iPhone line, and one should expect to see these changes coming to the iPad, and iPad mini, if rumors are to be believed.
In all, the iPhone 5 updates are significant by any reasonable measure.

Tech pundits have always had a negative view of Apple simply because Apple does not play by their rules. Why do think they keep using words like "loyal fan base", "cult like", "religion" , etc. This seems to be the talking point these days, that Apple is a marketing company, not a tech company. When all you care about is technical specifications it's very hard to accept the design and usability factor. So you have to invent a denengrating reason for the success of something you don't understand. Tech punditry keeps hammering away even though they continually wind up with egg on their faces. They simply don't care that they don't get it.
post #13 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

46.5M over 13 weeks = 3.5Million a week (500K a day 21,000 an hour).
I think the only thing that would impact this is the iPad mini in the <400 range, as that would muddy the purchase dollars ("Do I buy a new phone, or use the old phone and buy an iPad Mini?"). Assuming it will have a lower Profit (per unit, the gross margin% may be the same), that would lower the earnings for the quarter. But for apple, it's a problem I think they would love to have (my intuition is those that buy and iPad are likely 'upgraders'(got an iPhone, waiting for a smaller iPad)... those that buy a iPhone are likely 'switchers')

I don't see how a 7" iPad mini priced at $300-500 could possibly have the same margins as a 4" iPhone priced at $599-799.  The iPad would only have more of everything - screen real estate, battery, similar processor you assume... so I don't see how production costs of the iPhone 5 estimated at $260 can go down by 40% for a larger more novel device.

post #14 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

A minor update? The pundits must be looking at the iPhone 5 with their brains shut down. Hardware wise, the iPhone 5 is a significant upgrade: A6, new Qualcomm chips (LTE), new touchscreen technology, new size, new manufacturing process, new camera, possibly significant speed enhancement, new suppliers.
Then there's the significant changes going from ios 5 to iOS 6. Many features will be backward compatible, of course, but still significant.
The changes made for the iPhone 5 will allow for future developments in the iPhone line, and one should expect to see these changes coming to the iPad, and iPad mini, if rumors are to be believed.
In all, the iPhone 5 updates are significant by any reasonable measure.

Of course they are. It's the same old tripe these folks trot out every time there is a new phone from Apple. Copy and paste crap.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #15 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill42 View Post

The analysts pretty much get it wrong every time. Lets see. The iPod will never sell for the premium price over other MP3s. The iPhone will never make it in an established phone market of Nokia and Motorola phones. The iPad is just a big iPhone and it will never sell because it doesn't have a full OS like PC tablets. The iMac looks like a toy and doesn't ahve a floppy so it won't change the world of computers forever. The Macbook Air is too expensive and has no optical drive. Then look at every revision of each product and the analysts always say there are minor revisions and these things are boring and they won't sell.
I can't think of a single time when the early tech analysts have been right about a single apple product.
Except when they said the Cube wouldn't sell. It was actually really cool and revolutionary but there was not a big market for it.

Note there's a difference between "analysts" (as in, Wall Street) and "pundits" (as in, gizmodo). The analysts actually do a much better job than the pundits (which really tells you something about how bad the pundits do!) 

post #16 of 48
iPhone 5 almost looks like it could be a fine collectible, I want one badly!
post #17 of 48

I think part of the issue here is a disconnect between the interests of smartphone buyers and the interests of pundits. The pundits just want an entertaining show and something to write about (that people will read). If Apple just comes out with yet another iPhone that consumers love, that's not exciting -- who is going to read a story about the sun rising in the morning? How are they going to get people to read their pontifications? Solution: invent controversy by trashing Apple. Then cover the controversy. Then run a story "wow, look, despite all it had going against it, the iPhone did great!". 

 

Consumers, on the other hand, just want a good product. 

post #18 of 48

I'm not sure about the 'great deal of pressure'. It seems as if customers are accustomed to having different brands of smartphone and there are big names that sell well. People who love their Android devices may find little reasons to switch to iOS, especially now that Android is becoming slicker. I don't think that the current market will see huge movements of adoption, in either direction. iOS may have the quality, but they have the quantity.

post #19 of 48
Though I haven't received my new iPhone 5, I trust it will be fast, reliable, and versatile. In other words, it will be just like the 3G and 4 models I owned previously. As far as "boring" is concerned, there are also many favorable opinions regarding the new device. If you're reading this, you have probably already seen them.

I am a late-comer to the Apple ecosystem (2009), so I'm not sure if I qualify as a "fanboy" nor do I care. But as a techie, I am very pleased that, with Apple, "simplicity IS the ultimate sophistication." Among many other things, I am also confident that customer service and OS/iOS updates will remain both responsible and timely.

iPhone 5 sales probably will be incredible during the next 3 1/2 months (they usually are after a new and "boring" release of the iPhone). Record revenues, stock prices, and market capitalization will occur and thus validate the direction of Apple's decision-makers. Approving shareholders will smile and disapproving pundits will be amazed.
post #20 of 48

I think the biggest factor is simply WHEN are peoples' upgrades? Most people aren't going to drop $600-800 to have it a few months early. 

I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
Reply
I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
Reply
post #21 of 48
Even if it doesn't quite make that number it's still a shed load of phones.
post #22 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I'd think by now we should be able to get a fairly accurate equation to figure out sales based on historical data. If they really did double their first 24 hour pre-orders does that equate to doubling their quarterly sales?
Any math people want to take a swing at it?

Sorry not answering your question as such but I'd think there are too many unknowns to even try to work this out with math. For example the number of those with 3Gs now finally convincing themselves this time they'll upgrade or all those not able to get iOS 6 and so on. One thing I do know is I see more and more iPhones everywhere I go.

I really had to keep a straight face when the receptionist at my hair dresser's last week, a glamorous young blonde, had a new one she proudly fiddled with and explained she'd switched from Android after seeing the video on YouTube showing the holographic keyboard iPhones had but she hadn't yet figured out how to get that to work. I am not kidding! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzsBwnv_dAg)
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #23 of 48
Those damn tech-pundits are idiots.  They wouldn't know what consumers want in terms of electronics devices if Sky Daddy sent a message directly into their pointy, tech-filled heads.  I hope Apple knocks iPhone 5 numbers out of the park.  The whole problem is that even if Apple proves these idiots wrong, they'll still insist that the iPhone is not worthy of their standards.  I'm so glad that Apple sells to the average consumer looking for a decent product with decent customer service and they're not swayed by know-it-all tech jackasses' opinions.
 
I don't know what these tech geniuses are expecting in the way of a new iPhone.  Do they want something they can fold up in their hands to the size of a matchbook and has a week-long battery life while talking over LTE?  Don't they realize there are practical limitations when building real products that real people use.  That their devices can't be some super-expensive prototypes.  If it was that easy, every company would be selling hundreds of millions of devices.  Every time some new Apple product comes out, these tech-pundits are calling it disappointing.  I wonder if any one of them has ever designed a product to sell to the mass market.
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Sorry not answering your question as such but I'd think there are too many unknowns to even try to work this out with math. For example the number of those with 3Gs now finally convincing themselves this time they'll upgrade or all those not able to get iOS 6 and so on. One thing I do know is I see more and more iPhones everywhere I go.
I really had to keep a straight face when the receptionist at my hair dresser's last week, a glamorous young blonde, had a new one she proudly fiddled with and explained she'd switched from Android after seeing the video on YouTube showing the holographic keyboard iPhones had but she hadn't yet figured out how to get that to work. I am not kidding!

Not that's funny! Just as scary, I've met others expecting the same.

post #25 of 48

Pundits expect Apple to reinvent the wheel every year yet pundits also expect the same crap from Sammy, et al.. That is impossible to do. Besides, why change for the sake of change. The iphone 4/4S are pretty beautiful and have functional designs. They were the #1 phones during their initial release years. Apple improves upon them.
 

post #26 of 48
Sow hen Apple sells a "disappointing" 46 million, and "misses" projections, hitch does not match up this number pulled from someone's ass, are we gonna have a bunch of stories about how apple is doomed and did not perform as expected?

It's like their 3rd quarter this yr, it was the best in their history (by far) yet was spun as "Apple is doomed". Meanwhile, almost every single other tech company is bleeding money.
post #27 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill42 View Post

The analysts pretty much get it wrong every time. Lets see. The iPod will never sell for the premium price over other MP3s. The iPhone will never make it in an established phone market of Nokia and Motorola phones. The iPad is just a big iPhone and it will never sell because it doesn't have a full OS like PC tablets. The iMac looks like a toy and doesn't ahve a floppy so it won't change the world of computers forever. The Macbook Air is too expensive and has no optical drive. Then look at every revision of each product and the analysts always say there are minor revisions and these things are boring and they won't sell.
I can't think of a single time when the early tech analysts have been right about a single apple product.
Except when they said the Cube wouldn't sell. It was actually really cool and revolutionary but there was not a big market for it.

 

 

Good summary, very true !

post #28 of 48
It's sad that tech pundits are confusing innovation with external design. Their motto: If it does not look different, it must not have improved. This is not surprising given that most pundits are not engineers or scientists. Still, you'd think they can appreciate the remarkable A6 (two cores beating or neck-n-neck in performance with quad core chips!), the thin display and remarkable engineering gone into accommodating a 8MP camera in a 7.6 mm thick package.
Edited by Harbinger - 9/18/12 at 10:14am
post #29 of 48
The reason people were underwhelmed is not the spec, but the lack of a brave new industrial design to get people pumped up and of course, move beyond the 1980s Sony design aesthetic of the 4 series iPhones. For example, many hoped for a blend of the original unibody iPhone 1 (I have a fully working one right here and it's lovely and comfortable being so curvy) and the 2011/2012 MacBook Air. Namely, a slick tapered unibody case and some unique new hardware and software features that show Apple are still capable of innovating not just doing what is easy.

To date, Google's Android is more intelligent than iOS, in particular when it comes to Motorola with their location and time aware widgets and features.

I know from travelling around the world and on public transport her in the UK that the majority of people who purchase iPhones, in particular the latest models (other than devs and genuine Apple lovers), are young people who would otherwise buy a BlackBerry and are very social. In fact, I have in the last few days seen young women walk into phone shops with their BBs or early iPhones and order the iPhone 5. The other half of the demographic are slick professionals in the city who like to dress to impress. Believe me, they do not care a sausage about the A6 processor even if it does mean that Facebook or their SalesForce app launches much quicker!

I visited London and Chicago recently and almost everyone had an iPhone 4S, and they fitted right into the aforementioned demographic.

The rest of the world is more geeky and will opt for Android.

The iPhone 5 is NOT a threat to Android, it is a threat to Nokia/Microsoft and RIM, although I think the Lumia 920 will appeal to those who like to dress different.

En garde!
post #30 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

The reason people were underwhelmed is not the spec, but the lack of a brave new industrial design to get people pumped up and of course, move beyond the 1980s Sony design aesthetic of the 4 series iPhones. For example, many hoped for a blend of the original unibody iPhone 1 (I have a fully working one right here and it's lovely and comfortable being so curvy) and the 2011/2012 MacBook Air. Namely, a slick tapered unibody case and some unique new hardware and software features that show Apple are still capable of innovating not just doing what is easy.
To date, Google's Android is more intelligent than iOS, in particular when it comes to Motorola with their location and time aware widgets and features.
I know from travelling around the world and on public transport her in the UK that the majority of people who purchase iPhones, in particular the latest models (other than devs and genuine Apple lovers), are young people who would otherwise buy a BlackBerry and are very social. In fact, I have in the last few days seen young women walk into phone shops with their BBs or early iPhones and order the iPhone 5. The other half of the demographic are slick professionals in the city who like to dress to impress. Believe me, they do not care a sausage about the A6 processor even if it does mean that Facebook or their SalesForce app launches much quicker!
I visited London and Chicago recently and almost everyone had an iPhone 4S, and they fitted right into the aforementioned demographic.
The rest of the world is more geeky and will opt for Android.
The iPhone 5 is NOT a threat to Android, it is a threat to Nokia/Microsoft and RIM, although I think the Lumia 920 will appeal to those who like to dress different.
En garde!


Tapered design makes sense for a laptop but not necessarily for a handheld device. Putting hardware and software features just for the sake of pretending to be innovative makes no sense.

 

Of course iPhone is not a threat to Android. One is a system product. The other is an OS/platform. A threat to RIM? Seriously? What does RIM have to lose these days?

 

You like the Lumia 920? How much does it cost? When is it coming out? You don't know and neither does Nokia. Does it really have video stabilization or do you have to fake it like Nokia did in their demo? If the Lumia is so great, why did Nokia trip over itself to announce it before it is ready?

 

There is in fact true innovation in iPhone 5. I challenge you to name them, and then name the true innovation in recently released Android and WP8 devices. If you can't, then it's time to shut up.

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

The reason people were underwhelmed is not the spec, but the lack of a brave new industrial design to get people pumped up and of course, move beyond the 1980s Sony design aesthetic of the 4 series iPhones. For example, many hoped for a blend of the original unibody iPhone 1 (I have a fully working one right here and it's lovely and comfortable being so curvy) and the 2011/2012 MacBook Air. Namely, a slick tapered unibody case and some unique new hardware and software features that show Apple are still capable of innovating not just doing what is easy.
To date, Google's Android is more intelligent than iOS, in particular when it comes to Motorola with their location and time aware widgets and features.
I know from travelling around the world and on public transport her in the UK that the majority of people who purchase iPhones, in particular the latest models (other than devs and genuine Apple lovers), are young people who would otherwise buy a BlackBerry and are very social. In fact, I have in the last few days seen young women walk into phone shops with their BBs or early iPhones and order the iPhone 5. The other half of the demographic are slick professionals in the city who like to dress to impress. Believe me, they do not care a sausage about the A6 processor even if it does mean that Facebook or their SalesForce app launches much quicker!
I visited London and Chicago recently and almost everyone had an iPhone 4S, and they fitted right into the aforementioned demographic.
The rest of the world is more geeky and will opt for Android.
The iPhone 5 is NOT a threat to Android, it is a threat to Nokia/Microsoft and RIM, although I think the Lumia 920 will appeal to those who like to dress different.
En garde!

 

 

Niece (and well balanced) try to present Apple consumers as « fashion people ».

 

As far as Microsoft/Nokia/RIM are concerned, I think that , quarter after quarter, the sales figures that Apple will issue will crucify them … 

post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

The reason people were underwhelmed is not the spec, but the lack of a brave new industrial design to get people pumped up and of course, move beyond the 1980s Sony design aesthetic of the 4 series iPhones. For example, many hoped for a blend of the original unibody iPhone 1 (I have a fully working one right here and it's lovely and comfortable being so curvy) and the 2011/2012 MacBook Air. Namely, a slick tapered unibody case and some unique new hardware and software features that show Apple are still capable of innovating not just doing what is easy.
To date, Google's Android is more intelligent than iOS, in particular when it comes to Motorola with their location and time aware widgets and features.
I know from travelling around the world and on public transport her in the UK that the majority of people who purchase iPhones, in particular the latest models (other than devs and genuine Apple lovers), are young people who would otherwise buy a BlackBerry and are very social. In fact, I have in the last few days seen young women walk into phone shops with their BBs or early iPhones and order the iPhone 5. The other half of the demographic are slick professionals in the city who like to dress to impress. Believe me, they do not care a sausage about the A6 processor even if it does mean that Facebook or their SalesForce app launches much quicker!
I visited London and Chicago recently and almost everyone had an iPhone 4S, and they fitted right into the aforementioned demographic.
The rest of the world is more geeky and will opt for Android.
The iPhone 5 is NOT a threat to Android, it is a threat to Nokia/Microsoft and RIM, although I think the Lumia 920 will appeal to those who like to dress different.
En garde!

 

I see it this way,  Android is like the Microsoft of the mobile devices.  Since Microsoft is sucking wind in the smartphone tablet arena.

 

Android pros - Lots of phone choices, lots of features in the OS, lots of eye candy, BUT lots of Malware.

iOS - One model per year, consistent design/engineering/technology driven and brings features on a level that isn't overwhelming.  Pretty much NO Malware.

Windows 8 - Some decent hardware, more choices, but the Interface is either Love it/hate it.  Personally I hate it.  No apps/

 

What the demographics are AS FAR AS I KNOW.

 

Android - teenagers, geeks that like to customize, create apps, create malware, and gamers that like to over clock.

IOS - Pretty much every demographic, but includes CORPORATIONS, BUSINESSES, and people that HAVE MONEY to spend on apps and accessories.

Windows 8 = Probably those that bought a Zune and Microsoft employees.  Remember Microsoft got upset as Microsoft employees started to bring iPhones and iPads to work.

post #33 of 48

Wrong.

 

Android innovations...

 

Time and location based app or feature status on Motorola phones.

 

Putting (Samsung Galaxy S3) up to your ear whilst texting automatically starts a call to the person you are texting

 

Front camera on S3 monitors the user's face. When they look away, it dims the display. Superb idea.

 

Again, on the S3 (and future Samsung phones), the buddy photo feature that automatically sends photos of friends to them using the facial recognition system.

 

Robust case of most Android phones mean you don't need a case. The iPhone 4S and 5 were marketed as being sexy by Apple, yet people cover them in protective cases because if you drop a 4 or 5 series, it will shatter. I know, ALL my friends with a 4 or 4S have broken the screen or rear several times. I have dropped my Android and Nokia phones and never broken any part of them.

 

I love Apple, but they are NOT clever with features. Their calendar app is terrible and iCloud is a shiny but impractical disaster, something that would take me several pages to explain.

 

I am a software and industrial designer with >20 years experience and know precisely what I am talking about, so don't be so rude when I'm making a totally valid point.

 

I am typing this on an example of a more thoughtful and intelligent less greedy Apple product, the excellent 2011 edition 13" MacBook Air i7.

 

I agree that there may be issues with a tapered design, but i was making a point that Apple could have updated it. There isn't even a mechanical camera shutter release. Using the volume button is a nightmare because the camera lens is in the wrong position to make it practical. Try it! Bloody nightmare, you have to take about 5 photos to get the right one!

 

Sorry, the 5 is a very powerful phone and will sell millions, but it is NOT intelligently designed or thought out. As J'Ive himself implies in the Apple video, it is a piece of superb precision engineering, but it is not smart. It is the blonde of smart phones.

 

One more thing, the adapter required to convert lightening to older docks etc will be useless as the phone will be pushed up. Further, why no thunderbolt to enable high speed data syncing for those who don't want to use wireless? What a great way to reduce the price of the chipset and encourage standardisation of the technology before, like Firewire, it is stillborn?

 

Don't let your love of Apple or their products cloud a impartial analysis of the product.

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Wrong.

 

Android innovations...

 

Time and location based app or feature status on Motorola phones.

 

 

This is a feature, not an innovation. Implementation difficulty: low. Make that zero.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

 

Putting (Samsung Galaxy S3) up to your ear whilst texting automatically starts a call to the person you are texting

 

 

Feature implementation, not innovation. Again, low degree of difficulty.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Front camera on S3 monitors the user's face. When they look away, it dims the display. Superb idea.

 

Somewhat innovative but more on the clever side rather than innovative. Again, low degree of difficulty.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

 

Again, on the S3 (and future Samsung phones), the buddy photo feature that automatically sends photos of friends to them using the facial recognition system.

 

 

There is innovation here, but not in what Samsung did. The innovation has been in development for decades and now so mature that every company uses it. The basic that Samsung uses it in this way means they've embedded someone else's innovation in a feature. This is another example how many people don't understand what real innovation is.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Robust case of most Android phones mean you don't need a case. The iPhone 4S and 5 were marketed as being sexy by Apple, yet people cover them in protective cases because if you drop a 4 or 5 series, it will shatter. I know, ALL my friends with a 4 or 4S have broken the screen or rear several times. I have dropped my Android and Nokia phones and never broken any part of them.

 

 

That's not even worth mentioning in a discussion about innovation.  I am calling you a liar BTW. Because I do not believe for a second that ALL your friends with 4 and 4S have had their screen broken SEVERAL times. What a flagrant, unbelievable lie.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

 

Robust case of most Android phones mean you don't need a case. The iPhone 4S and 5 were marketed as being sexy by Apple, yet people cover them in protective cases because if you drop a 4 or 5 series, it will shatter. I know, ALL my friends with a 4 or 4S have broken the screen or rear several times. I have dropped my Android and Nokia phones and never broken any part of them.

 

I love Apple, but they are NOT clever with features. Their calendar app is terrible and iCloud is a shiny but impractical disaster, something that would take me several pages to explain.

 

I am a software and industrial designer with >20 years experience and know precisely what I am talking about, so don't be so rude when I'm making a totally valid point.

 

 

And I am Barack Obama. Maybe you're a software developer. Maybe you're an ID. But that does not mean you know PRECISELY what you are talking about. If you did, you wouldn't have to bring you your credentials. When a point is invalid, your professional background, whether real or imagined, is irrelevant.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

 

I am typing this on an example of a more thoughtful and intelligent less greedy Apple product, the excellent 2011 edition 13" MacBook Air i7.

 

I agree that there may be issues with a tapered design, but i was making a point that Apple could have updated it. There isn't even a mechanical camera shutter release. Using the volume button is a nightmare because the camera lens is in the wrong position to make it practical. Try it! Bloody nightmare, you have to take about 5 photos to get the right one!

 

 

Ah ha. That must be why photos taken using an iPhone outnumber all other smartphones together by a ratio greater than 10:1 - because iPhone owners have to keep taking more to get them right. Can't be because the iPhone owners simply enjoy using their phones more, for photography and other apps. And they keep using them so much despite what a bloody nightmare it is. Uh huh.

 

I could go on, but you've not named a true innovation from either an iPhone or non-iPhone. And they do exist, BTW. Total fail! If you're a software developer, I sure hope you don't work on important projects.

post #35 of 48

why change for the sake of change? Android phones have to differentiate between themselves otherwise they'll get lost in the bargain bin of generics. I'm sure Apple's design team has been doing industrial design > 20 years as well. In addition many believe the iphone 4 is a beautiful design. They just improved upon it.

 

I've dropped my iphone once and it didn't shatter. I just don't want to dent it. I actually care about my phone. It isn't disposable like androids.

 

Why use thunderbolt? That is overkill for a connection. Let alone the size of the port and the internals.
 

As for people not caring about the A6? Apple does not run off a list of specs to impress customers (unlike Sammy), they just show you what the phone can do.

post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

 

I see it this way,  Android is like the Microsoft of the mobile devices.

 

 

No it is not. People keep using that analogy because they feel a need to use one. But that simply does not fit even with a shoe horn. Different revenue model. Proprietary platform v. open source (pseudo-open). Totally different architectures. Highly consistent UI from one hardware vendor to another on Windows. Not so on Android (even the gesture sets are different). Total control of Windows by MS. Not so with Android - carriers and hardware vendors all have varying degrees of control.

 

In fact, please name 5 important similarities outside of the fact that both Windows and Android are intended to be used on 3rd party hardware.

 

Don't fall for the trap that the closest analogy is in fact close.

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

why change for the sake of change?

Exactly!!!

 

The fact that the likes of Samsung keep changing their external design shows their insecurity. Furthermore, there are in fact significant changes from iPhone 4S to iPhone 5 in the industrial design. A real ID knows that design is not just about what the eyes perceive from internet photos. The changes in the back are significant, profound and innovative - something that few Android device makers could pull off or would even want to try. When you finally get your hands on it, then you'll appreciate it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

 

I've dropped my iphone once and it didn't shatter. I just don't want to dent it. I actually care about my phone. It isn't disposable like androids.

 

Doesn't that just baffle you? Every friend of his has broken their screens several times! What a fabulist!

post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

I am a software and industrial designer with >20 years experience and know precisely what I am talking about, so don't be so rude when I'm making a totally valid point.

 

You're not an ID with 20 years experience. That much is clear. If you were, you would appreciate the profound changes between 4S and 5. The fact that you would label them as unchanged says it all. Just the changes in the back alone are something to behold. You might figure this out when you finally get your hands on one. If you were a real ID, you would appreciate it already.

post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post


 

Doesn't that just baffle you? Every friend of his has broken their screens several times! What a fabulist!

Android devices are more durable. I got so frustrated with my old Android device that I threw it. It survived. I'll give him that.

post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Wrong.

<<<<blah blah blah>>>>>

I am a software and industrial designer with >20 years experience and know precisely what I am talking about, so don't be so rude when I'm making a totally valid point.

<<<<more blah blah blah>>>>>

One more thing, the adapter required to convert lightening to older docks etc will be useless as the phone will be pushed up. Further, why no thunderbolt to enable high speed data syncing for those who don't want to use wireless? What a great way to reduce the price of the chipset and encourage standardisation of the technology before, like Firewire, it is stillborn?

Don't let your love of Apple or their products cloud a impartial analysis of the product.
You're a lier. If you were a real engineer... you would know the answer to your question already. The internal Flash memory can't make use of the bandwidth provided by Thunderbolt, same reason it can't if Lightning was USB 3.

Edited, because nobody needs to read that #%^ twice.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Holiday iPhone sales projected to reach 46.5M as pundits 'underestimate' Apple
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Holiday iPhone sales projected to reach 46.5M as pundits 'underestimate' Apple