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Apple hiring developers to work on widely-criticized iOS 6 Maps - Page 4

post #121 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by msalganik View Post

Me wanting to be able to upgrade RAM and HDD on my own is not getting? Those are basics and Apple has had it on most of their computers for a while. Heck i just bought a new computer from them that still offers that option! I don't mind the other stuff being non-upgradable, and I do like Apples approach for hardware/software integration.. its the whole reason I own an Apple and not a PC. The decision to prevent RAM and HDD upgrades however stinks of profiteering and not any real design agenda. The whole "you don't get it" line just makes Apple users look like assholes, so for the sake of those of us (and I believe it to be the majority of Apple users) who like the company but aren't afraid to criticize once in a while, please keep your snobbish attitude to yourself. A company needs feedback in order to keep providing customers with what they want. Yes, Apple also redefines the rules sometimes and gives people something they didn't even know they wanted... that great, but the upgradability of HDD and RAM is NOT one of those instances.

Agree

 

Too many Apple apologists in our midst.  Don't be afraid speak your mind.  Jobs certainly didn't.

post #122 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

Except I am still confused as to how Apple screwed things up so bad. It is a map of the whole freaking world. There are errors for some. I haven't seen any errors yet. I live int he US. Further, Apple has added user input controls. If something is wrong, report it. 

As I have mentioned I really only used maps for two main features both of which are very poorly implemented in Apple maps in my evaluation, but can be worked around using Google's web app, however, after reading that Tumblr blog with page after page of really awful errors I actually felt sick thinking what kind of crisis management Apple must be going through.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #123 of 175

I love how articles about this are written as though Apple hadn't thought to hire anyone to keep it up and that they thought nothing was wrong with it. How Apple was completely blindsided and is desperately trying to hire people to fix it.

 

Did I say love? I didn't mean love… 

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #124 of 175

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/09/how-google-builds-its-maps-and-what-it-means-for-the-future-of-everything/261913/

In business, this is what we call a moat, and Google has invested significant money and manpower creating one of the largest and most effective moats I’ve ever seen--around their mapping software. They’ve got planes. They’ve got satellites. They’ve got cars and bikes with those crazy nine-eyed cameras. They’ve got hikers and bikers going on treks and trails. They’ve got trolleys rolling through museums and businesses. They’ve got public tram, bus, and trolley schedules. They’ve got traffic updates and estimated arrival times. They’ve got businesses signed onto place pages. They’ve got Frommer’s and Zagat. They’ve got a user-review system that’s popular and reliable. They’ve got travel information, navigation, points of interest, turn-by-turn directions...and it’s all free on their mobile platform. And they even have a crowd-sourcing option called Map Maker. And then you think about their data servers and their data organization prowess. Their ability to squeeze every bit of information from their collection process, organize it, and present it back to the world in a useful and lucrative manner.

The barrier to entry here is staggering. One does not simply walk into Mordor create a world map on the fly. It takes years and planning and vision. This is a massive moat, and the only thing Apple or any other competitors can do is to spend billions developing their own ground-truthing efforts or buying other mapping companies.

Actually, this would probably be a good time to own stock in the old telenav systems, because those companies are likely to be snatched up for their data sets by Google’s competitors.

 

This article sums everything up nicely: "iOS 6 is more about Apple than new user features"

http://www.imore.com/yes-ios-6-more-about-apple-new-user-features-thats-okay

 


Edited by Waverunnr - 9/21/12 at 2:49pm
post #125 of 175
They're probably stockholders. So they can't help themselves...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

Agree

 

Too many Apple apologists in our midst.  Don't be afraid speak your mind.  Jobs certainly didn't.

post #126 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

 I hope that Apple builds up a network of 'scouts' around the world to fix these issues and keep Apple up-to-date with local information.

 

They are, it's called "users".

 

If there is a problem you know about you can report it.

 

I've already done a couple in my area.

 

Just like with Open Maps where I fixed a street name.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #127 of 175
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Just like with Open Maps where I fixed a street name.

 

Now, wait, is Apple using Open Maps or Open Street Maps? They're different.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #128 of 175

I think it's all just the cartographic implementation of Steve's reality distortion field.

 

The shame of it is that the rest of iOS6 is very very good.

post #129 of 175
NO. Let's talk about it NOW.

Let's talk about why iOS6 is more about Apple than it's users.
Let's talk about why they keep releasing products that aren't finished.
Let's talk about why they have 100B in the bank and give money back to the shareholders, yet spend 1/3 of the money on R&D that Google and Microsoft do.

http://www.imore.com/yes-ios-6-more-about-apple-new-user-features-thats-okay

Why do any of us care about Google's bottom line? I sure as hell don't. I just want the features back that I had before.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Get off your high-horse.  You'd just love to spin some kind of iHating propaganda to suit your iHating agenda.

I'm glad Apple jettisoned Google off the iPhone.  Apple just removed millions of dollars and tracked-users from Google's bottom line.  I'm using the new Maps feature, have you??  Sure it's not polished as Google's offerings but let's re-address this discussion a few months from now see how much crow you'll be eating.

The reality is that most people will happy with it and look forward to improvements.  Sad people like you with nothing better to do will just find something else to whine about.

So get back to your mom's basement and stop pissing in everyone's pool.  


Edited by Waverunnr - 9/21/12 at 3:47pm
post #130 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Cartography is a area of little interest to most people.

 

Just like antenna engineering around two years ago.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #131 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

NO. Let's talk about it NOW.

Let's talk about WHY iOS6 is more about Apple than it's users.
Let's talk about why they keep releasing products that aren't finished.
Let's talk about why they have 100B in the bank and give money back to the shareholders, yet spend 1/3 of the money on R&D that Google and Microsoft do.

http://www.imore.com/yes-ios-6-more-about-apple-new-user-features-thats-okay

 

 

Oh, how cute, a link.

 

So, let's talk about it. Why don't you start and run down the list of 200 new features and explain in detail why each of them is more about Apple than it's users.

 

Then, you can explain to us with your inside knowledge of Apple, hardware and software development, exactly what finished means and how you determine it.

 

Then, you can explain to us how the amount of money spent relates to the quality of R&D. Here's a hint for that last one: it doesn't.

 

So, go on, you wanted to, talk about it now. Frankly, I don't think you have a coherent comment to make. I think you're just here to bellow and vent your spleen. You could surprise me, though, although I very much doubt it.

 

Otherwise, you should probably follow the friendly advice of the previous poster, you know, before you end up looking like more of a fool.

post #132 of 175
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Cartography is a area of little interest to most people.

 

Gotta say, I love cartography. Specifically alternate history cartography.


Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Let's talk about why they have 100B in the bank and give money back to the shareholders, yet spend 1/3 of the money on R&D that Google and Microsoft do.

 

We'd have to pretend this matters first.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #133 of 175
Apple has been using that "200 features" line forever. Good luck trying to count all 200. When I look at Apple's own iOS6 What's New Page, I don't see anything near 200 features.

http://www.apple.com/ios/whats-new/

And since they took features away, shouldn't that actually go against that number?

What does "finished" mean? It means releasing a product that has MORE features, not LESS than the previous version. It means releasing a product that actually works and isn't a buggy piece of crap

http://theamazingios6maps.tumblr.com/

I'm not the one that looks like a fool here. It's Apple for sinking so incredibly low by putting their hatred of google ahead of the interests of its users.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Oh, how cute, a link.

 

So, let's talk about it. Why don't you start and run down the list of 200 new features and explain in detail why each of them is more about Apple than it's users.

 

Then, you can explain to us with your inside knowledge of Apple, hardware and software development, exactly what finished means and how you determine it.

 

Then, you can explain to us how the amount of money spent relates to the quality of R&D. Here's a hint for that last one: it doesn't.

 

So, go on, you wanted to, talk about it now. Frankly, I don't think you have a coherent comment to make. I think you're just here to bellow and vent your spleen. You could surprise me, though, although I very much doubt it.

 

Otherwise, you should probably follow the friendly advice of the previous poster, you know, before you end up looking like more of a fool.

post #134 of 175
It clearly matters when you have incomplete product releases like Siri and Maps. This is a terrible trend.

Apple needs to axe Siri and license IBM's Watson. Since that system beat two of Jeopardy's best contestants, I'm sure it can handle any of the lame questions you folks come up with.

As far as maps go... when you have 100B in the bank, why not just buy the satellites needed to acquire your own data? Apple is supposed to be about taking risks and controlling the end-to-end experience. They've done neither here.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Gotta say, I love cartography. Specifically alternate history cartography.

 

We'd have to pretend this matters first.

post #135 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Apple has been using that "200 features" line forever. Good luck trying to count all 200. When I look at Apple's own iOS6 What's New Page, I don't see anything near 200 features.

http://www.apple.com/ios/whats-new/

And since they took features away, shouldn't that actually go against that number?

What does "finished" mean? It means releasing a product that has MORE features, not LESS than the previous version. It means releasing a product that actually works and isn't a buggy piece of crap

http://theamazingios6maps.tumblr.com/

I'm not the one that looks like a fool here. It's Apple for sinking so incredibly low by putting their hatred of google ahead of the interests of its users.
 

 

 

So, in other words, you are unable to back up your nonsensical claims? That's what i thought.

 

BTW, how useful is Watson outside a jeopardy tournament? Right, not so much.

post #136 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Bart View Post


exactly, blind loyalty helps nobody

 

 

Mob mentality helps very few people as well.

 

Most people complaining don't seem like they even used the maps. The media is looking for fault. The reality is if you didn't use Google's horrible version of IOS Maps before on the iPhone, like me, you are in no worst position now. You can still use third party solutions. Further, for most people I doubt they actually will have many problems with Apple's Maps. I live in Ann Arbor Michigan, and have been testing the App out. I think it works great. It is very fast, has turn by turn, and reroutes quick. This isn't to say there aren't problems, but from my experience people are over reacting. 

post #137 of 175
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post
Apple needs to axe Siri and license IBM's Watson. Since that system beat two of Jeopardy's best contestants, I'm sure it can handle any of the lame questions you folks come up with.


As far as maps go... when you have 100B in the bank, why not just buy the satellites needed to acquire your own data? Apple is supposed to be about taking risks and controlling the end-to-end experience. They've done neither here.

 

Nothing at all wrong with Siri. And you can't buy your way to perfection. Doesn't matter if you throw more money at R&D.

 

They are taking a risk here. Remember, "They got into the phone business. We didn't get into the search business." Apple's hand had been forced, and instead of having their users deal with their competitors' maps impeded by sub-standard web tech, they went and bought map companies and made their own native map.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #138 of 175

I backed up my claims with links that provided proof of said claims.  Are you blind or just mentally deficient?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

So, in other words, you are unable to back up your nonsensical claims? That's what i thought.

 

BTW, how useful is Watson outside a jeopardy tournament? Right, not so much.

post #139 of 175

Right.  OK.  There's nothing wrong with Siri.  And there's nothing wrong with Maps, either.

You people live in a fantasy world.  Must be nice.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Nothing at all wrong with Siri. And you can't buy your way to perfection. Doesn't matter if you throw more money at R&D.

 

They are taking a risk here. Remember, "They got into the phone business. We didn't get into the search business." Apple's hand had been forced, and instead of having their users deal with their competitors' maps impeded by sub-standard web tech, they went and bought map companies and made their own native map.

post #140 of 175

Did you even bother to watch the engineering marvels that Watson accomplished?  Not only did it answer almost all questions correctly, it understood the context of questions that were basically formed as riddles.  That is fearsome tech that is above and beyond anything close to what Siri can do. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

So, in other words, you are unable to back up your nonsensical claims? That's what i thought.

 

BTW, how useful is Watson outside a jeopardy tournament? Right, not so much.

post #141 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

I backed up my claims with links that provided proof of said claims.  Are you blind or just mentally deficient?

 

 

I see, you're just parroting things you read elsewhere. You aren't able to actually discuss it yourself except as unsupported bullet points. You've certainly confirmed all of my suspicions. Thanks.

post #142 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Did you even bother to watch the engineering marvels that Watson accomplished?  Not only did it answer almost all questions correctly, it understood the context of questions that were basically formed as riddles.  That is fearsome tech that is above and beyond anything close to what Siri can do. 
 

 

Yes, very useful tech, fearsome even, if you happen to find yourself on Jeopardy.

post #143 of 175
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post
Yes, very useful tech, fearsome even, if you happen to find yourself on Jeopardy.

 

But not in jeopardy, as the Anti-Apple Brigade often is.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #144 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Did you even bother to watch the engineering marvels that Watson accomplished?  Not only did it answer almost all questions correctly, it understood the context of questions that were basically formed as riddles.  That is fearsome tech that is above and beyond anything close to what Siri can do. 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

So, in other words, you are unable to back up your nonsensical claims? That's what i thought.

BTW, how useful is Watson outside a jeopardy tournament? Right, not so much.

Yes! And Watson frequently didn't have a clue. Sometimes, Watson could not understand the simplest of questions.

Like Siri, Watson is an amazing piece of work. But neither are perfect!

Dictated, with Siri, on my iPad.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #145 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Bart View Post


Thanks, that's a useful post. I'm just a concerned Apple shareholder who expects high standards from a great company that as a substantial shareholder, I partly own. I want to know how this mess slipped through and who if anyone is being held accountable.
Im notselling my shares, but im also not sitting back like these mice that blindly accept less than Apple's usual high standards.

 

You're the worst troll ever, you can't even keep your own story straight.

post #146 of 175

Watson is an AI flavored "natural language parser" . As such, the more terse the question you give it, the more possibility it screws up the answer, or perhaps it will just have no clues how to answer it correctly. Let's talk hypothetically about another imaginary Jeopardy! contest. One of Jeopardy! categories during this contest was "A Weapon of War". Now, supposed one of the clues in the category was "Pineapple". we can be 99% sure that Watson will have a hard time to find the fitting question for this answer within an allotted time. Watson will be limited to just three words, i.e weapon, war and pineapple, to find a suitable correct question for this category. 

 

Watson itself is also not a voice recognition program. In other words, for Watson to be better than SIRI or other similar applications, it has to incorporate a natural voice recognition technology as well. Some IBM labs have played with this capability since early 1980's. Now, the combination of these two technology will be the one capable to supplant SIRI and others like it. 

 

P.S. The answer is:

ระเบิดคืออะไร?

수류탄는 무엇인가?

手榴弾は何ですか?

什麼是手榴彈?

                           

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Yes! And Watson frequently didn't have a clue. Sometimes, Watson could not understand the simplest of questions.
Like Siri, Watson is an amazing piece of work. But neither are perfect!
Dictated, with Siri, on my iPad.

Edited by mcrs - 9/21/12 at 10:41pm
post #147 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


This is ridiculous - as is the "widely criticized" headline.
SOME people have problems, but some people have no problems. And some people have problems with Google Maps.
So where's the evidence that Apple's maps is significantly worse than Google's? Picking and choosing problems isn't a useful comparison - especially when you're picking problems with Apple's system and ignoring problems with Google's system. So far, it's the usual click-bait crap. Someone finds a problem and blows it up into 1,000 times worse than it is. Then, after the dust settles, it turns out that it wasn't that bad, after all.
Map-gate, indeed.

 

JR, I think once you move out of US, Apple Maps significantly deteriorate. Here in India it is practically useless. Anything I search for cannot be found and I cannot get directions between places. Of course they will first fix whatever issues they have in the US and then slowly move on to the smaller markets, but that still means that Maps on the iPhone is crippled in India till such time that the seach and directions are fixed. When that happens, considering how small the Indian market is for Apple, is anybody's guess.

 

I assume other people living in smaller markets may experience the same issues.

post #148 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by msalganik View Post

Well I am an apple fan... just got a new macbook pro, I've got an iPhone 4S and am planing on getting the iPad mini if it materializes. That out of the way, the new maps is bs in regards to content. I don't say this to hate on Apple, but when a company does something bad, I want them to know about it, otherwise they have no motivation to improve. They should've allowed for a year where the native google apps stuck around, sans turn by turn, along side the apple maps and NEXT year (iOS7), when apple maps would have the data it needs, then it would fly solo. This however was just plain dumb, and I hope that it is a reflection of conditions outside of their control (contract options with google) and not a sign of myopic, dim-witted decision making on the part of Apple execs. That said, I hope they don't just improve to fix bugs. I hope they swing for the fences and have it offer all the data/features (maybe not street view) that Google offers and more but in a faster, more user friendly iteration. Push the envelope guys... you've got the cash. On a side note, cut the @#$! with soldering in components like you did on your MPB. Design decisions like that kept me from spending more money of the retina macbook pro and getting the "old" unibody version instead. If you discontinue the unibodies and don't change this whole soldering deal with the retinas, I'm afraid my love affair with the mac will be over. I love your OS X, but I refuse to be forced into paying extortionist prices for ram and SSD (which are inferior)... I'll pay a premium for the apple computer but I want the freedom to extend it's life with basic upgrades later. Your computers are really nice but they aren't precious jewels that your users dare not open... and that's coming from a dedicated apple fan. 

 

I see this crap so often I just have to respond to it even though this is a dead thread (and you're obviously a paid troll, complete with boilerplate "I own umpty-jillion Apple devices" from the supplied playbook.)

 

 

All the changes in Apple products for the last several years have been in pursuit of rigidity and solidity at all costs, and the devil take the hindmost. I would see the lists of problems that people were complaining about in their macs (well, laptops, mostly), and the vast majority seemed to me to be due to broken connections. Apple knew why they were getting a unit back, and obviously drew the same conclusion. Connections are the root of all evil—plug-in connections like RAM are the worst, obviously, where the conductors can oxidize, dirt and dust can intrude, etc., but soldered connections are a problem as well, especially with the brittle lead-free solder everybody has to use nowadays.

 

The problem is case flex. Watch people picking up their laptops by one corner to lay them on a table or hand them to somebody else. Now do that a few thousand times and metal fatigue will do the rest—a broken connection to a port or a disk drive or whatever. There are two possible solutions: make the case extremely rigid so that there is no flex, or attach every internal piece loosely enough that the stress never gets communicated to their connections—let rattling and vibration do the job instead.

 

Most laptop makers seem to have chosen the second course, Apple chose the first. The came up with the unibody case, which is rigid enough that case flex is no longer a problem. Notice that they introduced the new case even though the lithium-polymer battery that could be molded to fit every little oddball cranny of the interior wasn't ready when it was supposed to be. They put out the unibody case with the old cans-in-a-box battery even though this meant they had to sacrifice something to fit it in. They chose the Firewire port, and decided to listen to a year of bitching and moaning about that rather than sell another years worth of bendy laptops with connections breaking all over the place.

 

Once that problem was dealt with, it was time to eliminate another huge failure point, the plug-in type of connection like RAM and disk drives use. They carefully scrutinized what percentage of users actually ever upgraded their system (vs. saying they're going to) and found it to be very, very small. The obvious decision is to make people decide how much memory and storage space they want and solder it in. The gain in reliability and longevity is easily worth the (usually imaginary) loss in upgradability. These new MacBook Pros and Airs with the soldered-in memory and flash storage will probably outlive their original owners. Of course, some people are going to complain that they can't modify the machine themselves, but it's a vanishingly small minority who actually would. (Plus a larger group who are absolutely convinced they would, even though they don't.)

post #149 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Bart View Post


Thanks, that's a useful post. I'm just a concerned Apple shareholder who expects high standards from a great company that as a substantial shareholder, I partly own. I want to know how this mess slipped through and who if anyone is being held accountable.
Im notselling my shares, but im also not sitting back like these mice that blindly accept less than Apple's usual high standards.

 

 

Sell your shares. I will likely buy them as I have held Apple for fifteen years. One thing I liked about Jobs was he could care less about shareholders and instead focused on building one of the best companies. Worrying about shareholders has ruined many great companies. 

 

You somehow act like Apple had a choice but to ship its own Map application and that every Board member and executive wasn't aware of the product. Nobody is going to be held accountable because as Apple said it is a work in progress and it works great for many people, myself included. Instead of complaining go use the App and use the useful tool to report all the supposed errors you must be finding. I haven't found one that I haven't found in every other Map app. 

post #150 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Yeah, you people sure do love to lie, don't you?

 

So I can laugh at it, what was the second one? 

 

Calling that out specifically… hmm…

 

 

 

Better just go buy a PC now. You don't get it.

 

I think this site needs some sort of 'Armchair CEO' filter:

 

Filter out all posts that contain any derivative of "This wouldn't have happened if Steve were still alive."

Filter out all posts that contain the word "skeuomorphic."

Filter out any post that starts with a list of Apple kit owned by the writer, who mistakenly believes it adds some sort of legitimacy to what he's saying.

post #151 of 175
Oh, I see. You ask for proof and then once you receive said proof, you accuse the person giving the proof of just copying what they read elsewhere.

lol. you're a joke. you realize that, right?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

I see, you're just parroting things you read elsewhere. You aren't able to actually discuss it yourself except as unsupported bullet points. You've certainly confirmed all of my suspicions. Thanks.

post #152 of 175
First off, Watson's accuracy is much higher than Siri's. Also, Watson's questions were in riddle form. Which means, it had not only had to understand WORDS but CONTEXT. This is where it's WAY smarter than Siri. And it should be considering the number of servers involved. As I recall, Watson beat the human contestants. Siri wouldn't have a chance.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Yes! And Watson frequently didn't have a clue. Sometimes, Watson could not understand the simplest of questions.
Like Siri, Watson is an amazing piece of work. But neither are perfect!
Dictated, with Siri, on my iPad.
post #153 of 175
I highly doubt anyone with a substantial amount of shares and thus ownership of Apple would be wasting time on this crappy page complaining about Apple's latest blunders.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Bart View Post


Thanks, that's a useful post. I'm just a concerned Apple shareholder who expects high standards from a great company that as a substantial shareholder, I partly own. I want to know how this mess slipped through and who if anyone is being held accountable.
Im notselling my shares, but im also not sitting back like these mice that blindly accept less than Apple's usual high standards.
post #154 of 175
You don't need to move out of the US to see what a beta-level product it is.

Penn State's campus? GONE.
Bike paths? GONE.
Transit directions? GONE.
Street view? GONE.

And don't bother saying I'm just trolling because these are all things I USED on a regular basis. F Apple for putting it's hatred of Google against the well-being of its customer base. They deserve all the negative press they get for this.

I'm starting to think that Tim Cook is too much of a bean counter and too fiscally conservative to keep Apple at the level of greatness its been over the past few years.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post

 

JR, I think once you move out of US, Apple Maps significantly deteriorate. Here in India it is practically useless. Anything I search for cannot be found and I cannot get directions between places. Of course they will first fix whatever issues they have in the US and then slowly move on to the smaller markets, but that still means that Maps on the iPhone is crippled in India till such time that the seach and directions are fixed. When that happens, considering how small the Indian market is for Apple, is anybody's guess.

 

I assume other people living in smaller markets may experience the same issues.

post #155 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by msalganik View Post

Me wanting to be able to upgrade RAM and HDD on my own is not getting? Those are basics and Apple has had it on most of their computers for a while. Heck i just bought a new computer from them that still offers that option! I don't mind the other stuff being non-upgradable, and I do like Apples approach for hardware/software integration.. its the whole reason I own an Apple and not a PC. The decision to prevent RAM and HDD upgrades however stinks of profiteering and not any real design agenda. The whole "you don't get it" line just makes Apple users look like assholes, so for the sake of those of us (and I believe it to be the majority of Apple users) who like the company but aren't afraid to criticize once in a while, please keep your snobbish attitude to yourself. A company needs feedback in order to keep providing customers with what they want. Yes, Apple also redefines the rules sometimes and gives people something they didn't even know they wanted... that great, but the upgradability of HDD and RAM is NOT one of those instances.

 

The design agenda is precisely why the machine is not upgradeable. By soldering stuff directly onto the boards, they eliminate the need for brackets that would make the machine thicker. If you don't like it then buy a different machine; Apple is not going to change this for the decreasing number of people who tinker with their computers (and the number was never that big to begin with).

post #156 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

There's no better way to tell Apple they missed the mark than to not use it.

No, the best way to tell Apple they missed the mark is to tell Apple they missed the mark.

 

If you have a problem with Maps then submit a bug report. That's how they gauge the real size of the problem.

post #157 of 175
You're honestly not too bright, aren't you?

I'll break it down for you, since you obviously need the help.

Watson's technology was shown off on Jeopardy because not only does it showcase its technical prowess for finding the correct answers to questions, but it took things a step further by showing it understood CONTEXT. Siri could never answer the tongue-in-cheek type questions you have on jeopardy. She can barely answer normally phrased questions.

So what exactly is misfiring in your brain to make you think that would only with, and is only applicable to, a TV game show?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

So, in other words, you are unable to back up your nonsensical claims? That's what i thought.

 

BTW, how useful is Watson outside a jeopardy tournament? Right, not so much.

post #158 of 175
I'm pretty sure they also gauge failures by all the negative press they are receiving.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

No, the best way to tell Apple they missed the mark is to tell Apple they missed the mark.

 

If you have a problem with Maps then submit a bug report. That's how they gauge the real size of the problem.

post #159 of 175

FYI, Watson doesn't have voice/speech recognition technology built in. In the Jeopardy! exhibition contest, someone was typing the clues to Watson, After all the clues were completely sent to Watson, then, via electronically controlled switch, any contestants will be able to press the button to answer but not before. It is actually a disadvantage for human competitors as many of Jeopardy! champions often times can figure out their answers before Alex Trebek even finishes reading the clues completely. It is more fair if Jeopardy let any contestant to buzz in at any time after the clue is displayed. Obviously, this will also creates a huge disadvantage for Watson since it also doesn't have any optical patterns/letters recognition ability.

 

SIRI, on the other hand, has the natural speech recognition  technology but with less robust database, less processing power and perhaps less advanced "natural language parser" relative to Watson's to back it up. All IBM has to do is to incorporate its voice recognition technology which it has been developing since the 1980's to Watson, then we can for be sure that SIRI will be left biting the dust.   

 

QUOTE:

 

Watson’s avatar, which viewers will see behind a standard Jeopardy! podium, is designer Joshua Davis’ artistic representation of the machine. It does not provide eyes or ears for Watson. Instead, Watson depends on text messaging, sent over TCP/IP, in order to receive the clue. At exactly the moment that the clue is revealed on the game board, a text is sent electronically to Watson’s POWER7 chips. So, Watson receives the clue text at the same time it hits Brad Rutter’s and Ken Jennings’ retinas."

 

END QUOTE. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

First off, Watson's accuracy is much higher than Siri's. Also, Watson's questions were in riddle form. Which means, it had not only had to understand WORDS but CONTEXT. This is where it's WAY smarter than Siri. And it should be considering the number of servers involved.As I recall, Watson beat the human contestants. Siri wouldn't have a chance.

 

post #160 of 175
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post
I think this site needs some sort of 'Armchair CEO' filter:

 

Filter out all posts that contain any derivative of "This wouldn't have happened if Steve were still alive."

Filter out all posts that contain the word "skeuomorphic."

Filter out any post that starts with a list of Apple kit owned by the writer, who mistakenly believes it adds some sort of legitimacy to what he's saying.

 

Interestingly enough, our auto spam filter has learned to catch some posts that could definitely be called trolling. lol.gif

 

While blocking skeuomorphic wouldn't be the best idea, the other two make perfect sense to add to some sort of "delete on sight" list.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
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