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Some users find scuffs, nicks on newly-purchased iPhone 5s [u] - Page 7

post #241 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

This is NOT a manufacturing process flaw. Instead, it is what you get with anodized aluminum. The problem can be minimized with "hard anodizing" but cannot be completely prevented.

I can understand such damage will show on use, but nicks during the assembly and packing? I would think that should be preventable with easy handling precautions.

I don't recall this being a big deal with the iPod nanos and shuffles, Apple has had a few generations of each with color anodizing.
Edited by JeffDM - 9/24/12 at 1:32pm
post #242 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

Aluminum was a dumb idea for a device that is handled on a daily basis.

 

Sorry, Dieter Rams would probably agree.

 

 

Sorry, he would most definitely not agree with you. There are thousands of products using anodized aluminum on a surface regularly handled by hands. What is a dumb idea is invoking the name of Dieter Rams when you are clearly neither qualified to criticize Apple designers nor knowledgeable enough about Rams's design, history and design principles to say what he would agree or disagree with. You sound like the type of person who would say "Steve would not have approved this", while forgetting the first iPhone has an anodized aluminum back.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

 

That said, is aluminum CHEAPER to mill than plastic is to mold?


No.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

 

Is Apple's reasoning to use aluminum solely based on costs to produce?

 

No, their reason is that they are against cheap plastic on principle.


Edited by Harbinger - 9/24/12 at 1:47pm
post #243 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


I can understand such will show on use, but knicks during the assembly and packing? I would think that should be preventable with easy handling precautions.
I don't recall this being a big deal with the iPod nanos and shuffles, Apple has had a few generations of each with color anodizing.


That is indeed a puzzle. But we have seen from past iPhone launches that a small percentage of them will be less than perfect. Lest we forget, 5 million units were sold!!!! Is it unreasonable that a few dozens were dropped? Ideally, they should not have been packaged and shipped but those "student interns" are under serious pressure to build "thousands" each day, aren't they?

 

How many whiners are honestly whining about out-of-the-box scratches and how many of them are in fact scuffing the devices themselves while handling them?


Edited by Harbinger - 9/24/12 at 1:43pm
post #244 of 265
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

No, their reason is that they are against cheap plastic on principle.

 

Nope. Aluminum just serves their purposes better.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #245 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Nope. Aluminum just serves their purposes better.


I don't disagree, but your point doesn't necessarily invalidate mine, which I am pretty sure of.

post #246 of 265

While we are discussing the merits of aluminum, does anyone understand why the Lumia 920 is soooooo heavy (180 grams!!!) despite sporting polycarbonate?

post #247 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

While we are discussing the merits of aluminum, does anyone understand why the Lumia 920 is soooooo heavy (180 grams!!!) despite sporting polycarbonate?

I'm sure there are other factors. The PC shell didn't look overly thick, I don't think it would need to be.

Battery for one: 920's battery is 2000mAh, iPhone 5 is 1440 mAh.

Maybe there's also an extra layer of glass, when Apple managed to integrate the touch sensor into the display's glass, rather in a separate layer above it? The 920's screen is larger.
post #248 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


I'm sure there are other factors. The PC shell didn't look overly thick, I don't think it would need to be.
Battery for one: 920's battery is 2000mAh, iPhone 5 is 1440 mAh.
Maybe there's also an extra layer of glass, when Apple managed to integrate the touch sensor into the display's glass, rather in a separate layer above it? The 920's screen is larger.


All good reasons, to a degree. The problem is that Nokia's latest and greatest is not just heavy when compared to the emaciated iPhone 5 (112 g), it is substantially heavier than the Galaxy SIII, HTC One X, Motorola RAZR M, all of which not coincidentally weighing in at a bit above or below 130 g. To be precise, the Lumia 920 is 50 g heavier than the Android beasts. Does Windows Phone 8 weigh that much?

post #249 of 265
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post
I don't disagree, but your point doesn't necessarily invalidate mine, which I am pretty sure of.

 

Were they against it on principle, these products would look much different.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #250 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Were they against it on principle, these products would look much different.

 

Cute, clever, elaborate linking.

 

Different products, different parts call for different principles. A battery charger made out of anodized aluminum might be slightly shocking. You may also recall that the Mac Mini changed from having plastic top and bottom to an aluminum unibody. They tried plastic backs on iP3G and iP3GS, and I doubt they will return to it.

 

And it is a matter of principle - so much so that they left plastic behind even though it could have made antenna design easier.


Edited by Harbinger - 9/24/12 at 2:37pm
post #251 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Stupid laptops.

OK Mr. Smarty Pants.

 

A phone goes in your pocket, your purse, etc....

 

Laptops, yea even the shiny ones that Apple makes, usually find there way into a soft cushioned cradle called a laptop bag.

 

But you know all this already...you are the omniscient Tallest Skil.

 

Whatever.

 

I still think Al was a stupid material to utilize for a handheld device.

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post #252 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

 

Sorry, he would most definitely not agree with you. There are thousands of products using anodized aluminum on a surface regularly handled by hands. What is a dumb idea is invoking the name of Dieter Rams when you are clearly neither qualified to criticize Apple designers nor knowledgeable enough about Rams's design, history and design principles to say what he would agree or disagree with. You sound like the type of person who would say "Steve would not have approved this", while forgetting the first iPhone has an anodized aluminum back.

 


No.

 

 

No, their reason is that they are against cheap plastic on principle.

What qualifies you to discount my thought that he WOULD NOT agree with me?

 

BTW, I have a MFA in Fine Arts

 

Not trolling, just expressing my thoughts and asking a legitimate question.

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   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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post #253 of 265
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

Laptops, yea even the shiny ones that Apple makes, usually find there way into a soft cushioned cradle called a laptop bag.

 

And this means what to me? More importantly, this means what to the argument at hand? Explain how they're different without trying to worm out of the discussion via a "case". Because phones can use cases, too. You want to bring cases into the discussion, that's fine; it just invalidates your original point entirely.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #254 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

Sorry, he would most definitely not agree with you. There are thousands of products using anodized aluminum on a surface regularly handled by hands. What is a dumb idea is invoking the name of Dieter Rams when you are clearly neither qualified to criticize Apple designers nor knowledgeable enough about Rams's design, history and design principles to say what he would agree or disagree with. You sound like the type of person who would say "Steve would not have approved this", while forgetting the first iPhone has an anodized aluminum back.



No.


No, their reason is that they are against cheap plastic on principle.

So what was the 3G/S made with?
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #255 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


So what was the 3G/S made with?


Try reading what I wrote instead of tripping over yourself with a gotcha.

post #256 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

What qualifies you to discount my thought that he WOULD NOT agree with me?

 

 

No offense, but your comment speaks for itself. His body of work speaks for where he stands on use of aluminum.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

BTW, I have a MFA in Fine Arts

 

 

So? Your comment clearly showed you were unfamiliar with Rams's work and unforunately unaware of wide use of aluminum in consumer goods, including many handheld products.

post #257 of 265

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

OK Mr. Smarty Pants.

 

A phone goes in your pocket, your purse, etc....

 

Laptops, yea even the shiny ones that Apple makes, usually find there way into a soft cushioned cradle called a laptop bag.

 

But you know all this already...you are the omniscient Tallest Skil.

 

Whatever.

 

I still think Al was a stupid material to utilize for a handheld device.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

And this means what to me? More importantly, this means what to the argument at hand? Explain how they're different without trying to worm out of the discussion via a "case". Because phones can use cases, too. You want to bring cases into the discussion, that's fine; it just invalidates your original point entirely.

 

It does seem silly to mention cases and conveniently forget that iPhones are more lovingly covered up than laptops.

post #258 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post


All good reasons, to a degree. The problem is that Nokia's latest and greatest is not just heavy when compared to the emaciated iPhone 5 (112 g), it is substantially heavier than the Galaxy SIII, HTC One X, Motorola RAZR M, all of which not coincidentally weighing in at a bit above or below 130 g. To be precise, the Lumia 920 is 50 g heavier than the Android beasts. Does Windows Phone 8 weigh that much?

To be clear, is this tangential to the PC / Al discussion? Galaxy S III has a PC shell as well.

Other than that, I don't know. The glass might be really thick to do the unusual curved look.
post #259 of 265
I see plenty of folks who don't use a case with their phone.

I simply think it's not a wise design choice, there is no denying that aluminum is not the most durable metal.

Sure, its easy to mill, and is relatively strong, but not in the least more resistant to scuffs than say plastics or other metals.
Edited by Woodlink - 9/25/12 at 12:53pm

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post #260 of 265

I could not agree more with the opinion that the fine finish of the device is compromised by factory handling or workmanship. You can be Leica would not let that go out.

Having a 3Gs, I have been looking forward to the new phone and as I always have a case it may not be an issue (for me), but it is almost too beautiful to cover up. I prefer the metal finish to those plastic phones out there.

al

post #261 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Why does it seem like Apple can't release anything anymore without something being wrong with it? What happened to quality control?

 

 

Dude, get real.  You're talking about maybe a dozen phones out of 5,000,000.   Their quality control is actually amazing.  

I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #262 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post


All good reasons, to a degree. The problem is that Nokia's latest and greatest is not just heavy when compared to the emaciated iPhone 5 (112 g), it is substantially heavier than the Galaxy SIII, HTC One X, Motorola RAZR M, all of which not coincidentally weighing in at a bit above or below 130 g. To be precise, the Lumia 920 is 50 g heavier than the Android beasts. Does Windows Phone 8 weigh that much?

I just realized I forgot the Lumia 920 has a wireless charging system.
post #263 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

I simply think it's not a wise design choice, there is no denying that aluminum is not the most durable metal.

It can scratch quite easily with a single contact with a key:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ry91JsHcrN0#t=9s

but you just put a protector on it:



IMO shatter-resistance > scratch-resistance
post #264 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

What qualifies you to discount my thought that he WOULD NOT agree with me?

 

BTW, I have a MFA in Fine Arts

 

Not trolling, just expressing my thoughts and asking a legitimate question.

You have a Master of Fine Art in Fine Arts? How refreshing. 

post #265 of 265

Couldn't they have used coating technology from the automotive industry?

AluCeram comes to mind -> http://www.aluminium-award.eu/2008/entries/industrial/en-a6-allroad-aluminium-door-panel/

 

German technology though, the Chinese manufacturers most likely won't have it and I wonder about price for a small device (if it's possible to coat in bulk).

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