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iOS 6 gives iPhone 3GS another year of life support

post #1 of 43
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Apple is no longer selling its iPhone 3GS from 2009, but iOS 6 gives the device another year of usability, despite lacking support for some of the newest features.

When Apple debuted the iPhone 3GS at its June 2009 Worldwide Developer Conference, it played up the third revision of the iPhone as faster (thanks to its new Cortex-A8 APL0298C05, which one might retroactively name the "A3," with twice the RAM of previous models), a better 3MP camera (finally delivering video capture), and support for HSDPA wireless networks up to 7.2 Mbps.

Three years and three months later, and despite being discontinued from Apple's iPhone lineup, the iPhone 3GS is still supported by the newly released iOS 6, making it officially the longest supported smartphone capable of running a modern OS.

This is in stark contrast to rival smartphones introduced alongside it just over three years ago: the entire range of Windows Mobile 6.x devices, Palm's webOS Pre and Pixi, RIM's Blackberry 5.x lineup and all hardware running Google's Android 2.0 Eclair are not just unsupported today by those platforms' latest releases, but were in all cases not even supported through the first two years' contract life of those devices. That situation isn't changing either, with Google, Microsoft and RIM's platforms all gearing up to provide their new releases exclusively on new devices.



What iPhone 3GS gets in iOS 6



According to a report by ArsTechnica, while "the iPhone 3GS actually gets most of the new OS's tweaks and refinements," it found that "the new features also don't slow the phone down appreciably."

That's an improvement over Apple's previous releases of backward support. iOS 4 was particularly notorious for heaping too much on the plate of previous devices, resulting in many users complaining that they were better off not upgrading. Since then, Apple appears to have worked hard to keep older devices from being negatively impacted by new software updates, paring down backwardly supported features when necessary.

Apart from new iOS 6 features including Do Not Disturb, Safari enhancements including iCloud Tabs, Passbook, Facebook integration and Sheets sharing, Camera exposure lock, shared Photo Streams and numerous updates to Mail and other bundled apps, there are a few missing features on the iPhone 3GS upgraded to iOS 6: the processor intensive new 3D Maps and Flyover, Turn by Turn Navigation and Panorama camera capture are probably the most significant.

Other iOS 6 features unsupported on iPhone 3GS including Safari's Offline Reading List (likely due to its limited RAM) and support for new "Made for iPhone" hearing aids (also a hardware issue).

There's also no new support for previous iOS features that the iPhone 3GS never previously got, ranging from Siri to FaceTime to HDR photos. On the other hand, not even the year newer and significantly faster iPhone 4 supports iOS 6's new Navigation, Flyover or Panorama, nor does it support Siri or Cellular FaceTime (due to missing hardware support for those features).

"iOS 6 doesn't make the iPhone 3GS any slower or more difficult to use than it was before," Ars observed, "which should be good news to anyone who keeps theirs around as a secondary or backup phone?indeed, it's pleasantly surprising how many of the refinements and improvements make their way down to Apple's oldest-supported piece of iOS hardware."

Unparalleled backward support



Apple's three and counting years of software support for the iPhone 3GS is the longest run of any iOS device, and far longer than other smartphone platforms.

Shortly after Apple released the iPhone 3GS, it shipped its last update for the original 2007 iPhone, giving it right at three years of updates. By the end of that year it delivered its last update for the 2008 iPhone 3G.

This year's last update to iOS 5 was also the end of the line for the 2010 iPad (which is about a half a year newer than the iPhone 3GS. This means that in general terms, iOS devices have gotten two major new updates after their release version. The iPhone 3GS got three major updates, extending its functional life past four years, an eternity in the tech world.

Being qualified for a major update is pretty rare under Android, with only some of the top selling new handsets ever getting a single major update after their release. A range of new Android phones continue to ship with Android 2.x, which was released in 2010 alongside iOS 4. Samsung's flagship Galaxy S III is just now getting the latest Android 4.1 Jelly Bean release in some countries, despite it being released months ago.

The situation for Android doesn't appear to be getting better. At the end of 2011, half of the installed base was on the year old 2.3 Gingerbread while another 35 percent were still on 2.2 Froyo from mid 2010. Just 11 percent were still running something older than the year and a half old Froyo release. Today, Google reports that less than 23 percent are on the year old 4.0 ICS or newer, while 57 percent are on Gingerbread (which is now older than Froyo was last winter). Over 18 percent of active users are on something older than the nearly two year old Gingerbread.

Google promised to improve the software release fragmentation on Android, but these numbers do not indicate progress but rather some pretty significant regression. Additionally, Google's clearly articulated commitment to delivering 18 months of updates for new phones has been ignored by its licensees, few of whom have released any major software updates for phone models that are just a year old.

Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 similarly abandoned all support for existing Windows Mobile 6 devices a year ago with the release of the all new Windows Phone 7, and this winter's Windows Phone 8 will do the same thing to existing WP7 owners. Nokia's Symbian, RIM's BlackBerry OS and HP's Palm webOS have also rarely offered any significant software updates for their existing owners, particularly for phones more than a few months old.

Apple's easier task of supporting existing hardware



Why is Apple making a free update for a more than three year old phone? For one reason, it's easier for the company to backwardly support its installed base because there were only three major models of iPhone released over the last three years, and only a couple hardware variants for specific carriers.

Apple also intentionally made supporting the iPhone 3GS easier by giving it a forward thinking design. It was fast enough, had enough RAM and was build with the experience of two previous iPhone generations.

Other smartphone hardware makers often focus on the low end with devices, commonly lacking enough RAM to support even a single new major update. Other mobile platforms also support lots of different sub-models from a variety of competing vendors, with many specific to a particular carrier. And the mix of models from a single hardware maker, such as Samsung, LG or HTC, often changes several times within a year.

All these hardware designs are also typically designed independently from the software platform. That's why Google's new partner Intel just released a new smartphone (RAZRi) saddled with Android 4.0 ICS, which is already a year old, despite having based the "new" model on an existing design, and having coordinated with Google's own Motorola subsidiary to bring it to market.

Similarly, Nokia's latest announcement of its new WP8 Lumia lineup was hamstrung by delays related to Microsoft's new software release. A year ago, Nokia experienced similar coordination problems with Microsoft after attempting to launch a simplified version of its N9 configured to run WP7 instead of Meego Linux.

Certainly Apple would also have a tough time of supporting iOS on previous devices if it had to manage backward support for a wide range of licensees and their broad product offerings. The unsuccessful history of Mac OS licensing bears that out.

Apple has greater reason to supporting existing hardware



A second major reason why Apple extended support for iOS back to the iPhone 3GS is that there are a lot of iPhone 3GS users, and Apple wants them on the latest iOS release to give its App Store developers the largest installed base possible for its new OS.

In addition to awarding users with a software update that gives them new bells and whistles and typically faster Safari performance, Apple's backward support in iOS enables developers to target the latest release, knowing that will allow them to reach nearly the entire installed base out there.

It also helps to inspire confidence in developers considering whether to support new APIs and features such as Passbook or third party routing in the new Maps. If only the newest models (or only future models) were ever going to get iOS 6, a large number of developers would simply wait around for the new release to gain enough popularity before targeting it.

That fragmentation is a big problem for Android, where according to Google's own figures, 75 percent of smartphone users and the vast majority of tablets are running a version of Android 2.x that is now two years old. Why would developers target the new Android 4.1 Jelly Bean for custom development when just 1.2 of active users visiting the Google Play store have it installed?

Conversely, when developers have to reach backward to older OS platform releases, they not only can't use new features, but also must test against old versions of OS code with known bugs and limitations. Google faces that problem with its own Android Maps app. It simply can't target only the latest Android 4.1 release without losing 75 percent of the installed base of Android users. So it must track development of its Maps to old versions of Android.

In contrast, Apple's new iOS 6 Maps only works on iOS 6, so it can take full advantage of new features in iOS 6 and not worry about old issues that were fixed in the new release. That not only streamlines the company's software development, but allows Apple to recommend that third party developers aggressively target route integration support for iOS 6 Maps as well.

Apple's control over the whole widget also means that it can shift how the OS works across the board without creating too many problems. Two examples in iOS 6: the addition of new Advertiser ID policy in replacing UUIDs (giving users the ability to opt out of ad network tracking), and the third party rollout of the new Maps (all third party apps on iOS 6 now automatically use Apple's maps servers, and they don't need to update their apps to do so. There is one notable exception to this: Apple's own iPhoto continues to use a nonstandard map for geotagging that is neither Apple's new service nor Google's, an oddity apparently related to the offset release schedule between iPhoto and iOS 6).

Pushing ahead strategic platform goals with generous backward device support is not new to iOS 6. Last year, Apple pushed out broad support for features including Game Center, Notification Center, iCloud and AirPlay, helping to ensure that a critical mass of users were able to take advantage of the new features. These examples illustrate how Apple's efforts to support older devices gives it more power to actively shape future development on its platform.
post #2 of 43

Impressive.

 

The 3GS was released in June 2009.

post #3 of 43

Meanwhile, the first-gen iPad… 

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #4 of 43

Support the 3GS for freakin' forever ....

But drop my iPad 1 after just a couple years.

post #5 of 43
I wont bather to move from OS5 to 6.
My 3GS is working well and I don't want to mess with it.
I will likely upgrade next near to the 5 when the 5S is introduced.
My 3gs does just about everything I need and imagine it lasted 4 years!
post #6 of 43
My 3GS will be 4 years old next summer.
I plan on getting the 5 when Apple introduces the 5s.
The 3gs has been very reliable and works without a problem,
I love my phone,
post #7 of 43

I think the decision to support the 3GS with iOS 6 benefits developers more than anyone.  Remember, all of the new APIs in iOS 6?  Yeah, available on the 3GS.  This means developers can target 4 generations of phones at once in XCode.  And, folks with older phones have access to the latest apps. (Please correct me if I'm wrong.)



Edit: Most, but not all, new API's are available for developers on the 3GS.
Edited by runner7775 - 9/25/12 at 5:17am

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post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur123 View Post

I wont bather to move from OS5 to 6.
My 3GS is working well and I don't want to mess with it.

 

There's no reason to be worried.

 

My iPhone 3GS is running fine with iOS 6. 

 

Behaves the same as before.

post #9 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

There's no reason to be worried.

My iPhone 3GS is running fine with iOS 6. 

Behaves the same as before.

My buddies running iOS6 with a 3GS have said they love it, no changes for the worse so far.
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post #10 of 43
Developers do benefit, however users see some of the same benefits. For example each iOS release deletes a few more bugs. This is important to users because bugs often impact performance. Of course bugs impact developer, but each has his own approach to backward comparability.
Quote:
Originally Posted by runner7775 View Post

I think the decision to support the 3GS with iOS 6 benefits developers more than anyone.  Remember, all of the new APIs in iOS 6?  Yeah, available on the 3GS.  This means developers can target 4 generations of phones at once in XCode.  And, folks with older phones have access to the latest apps. (Please correct me if I'm wrong.)
post #11 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Support the 3GS for freakin' forever ....
But drop my iPad 1 after just a couple years.

Think of iPad one as Apples great gamble. A proof of concept that a tablet could meet with consummer acceptance. IPad ONE looks like a hole in one now but it was a huge gamble considering all the failures that came before. I really think its success caused Apple to go "all in" development wise and probably accelerated its custom processor design.
post #12 of 43

Consumers still love iPhone 3GS and prefer it over any Android device.

 

The fact Apple is still able to provide owners of this remarkable phone with updates is just mind-blowing to me.

post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Support the 3GS for freakin' forever ....
But drop my iPad 1 after just a couple years.

Think of iPad one as Apples great gamble. A proof of concept that a tablet could meet with consummer acceptance. IPad ONE looks like a hole in one now but it was a huge gamble considering all the failures that came before. I really think its success caused Apple to go "all in" development wise and probably accelerated its custom processor design.

 

I agree in part, but I think it also has a longer 'shelf' life than your normal smart phone, so I think the half life will be longer.  And that, coupled with your argument of the great gamble, Apple should reward those people who paid that 'all in' bet for you, and from those winnings allowed you to assemble the parlay into the iPad2/3.

 

Or, allow them to trade in for an iPad2 now for $199;-)

post #14 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Meanwhile, the first-gen iPad… 

 

As an app developer, I'm glad that the 1st gen iPad is getting dropped. It really holds back developers from making the most of the iPad 2 and 3. 

 

I fell sorry for active iPad 1 users but they must make up a pretty small percentage of all iPad users.

post #15 of 43
I have two 3GSs to sell and I upgraded them both to iOS 6 and they run equally well as they did with iOS 5.1.1. The only reason not to upgrade is if you want to retain the Google Map app, which is far better and more useful than Apple's Map. I might actually downgrade them back to 5.1.1 as a selling point.
post #16 of 43
Originally Posted by RichL View Post
As an app developer, I'm glad that the 1st gen iPad is getting dropped. It really holds back developers from making the most of the iPad 2 and 3. 

 

How doesn't the iPad 2 hold back developers? There are a great number of first-gens.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

How doesn't the iPad 2 hold back developers? There are a great number of first-gens.

 

Why would the iPad 2 hold back developers? It's got a decent amount of RAM and plenty of graphics grunt for the number of pixels it needs to display. It's the device that needs the least amount of testing.

 

I don't believe there's many active iPad 1 users out there. 300,000 iPad 1s were sold on release day, 2 million iPad 2s were sold on release day. The iPad 1 was sold for a year, the iPad 2 has been on the market for 18 months. I'd be surprised if they account for 5% of users.

post #18 of 43

The inspired and prescient genius of Jobs' commitment to total control of software/hardware will live on far into the future, there is simply no way that any manufacturer in the world is going to be able to emulate this. It is a testament to the man that his dogged determination to do what he knew was right in spite of ridicule and derision when things were not going so well.

post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

Support the 3GS for freakin' forever ....

But drop my iPad 1 after just a couple years.

I'm speculating here, but I think that it may be a RAM issue. The 1st gen iPad has the same amount of RAM as an iPhone 3Gs but has to support a much larger display. One of the big problems with later versions of iOS running on the original iPhone and the 3G was the lack of RAM and I think that Apple has learned to not try to shoe-horn an OS into a device that can't quite manage it. 

post #20 of 43
Originally Posted by RichL View Post
Why would the iPad 2 hold back developers? It's got a decent amount of RAM and plenty of graphics grunt for the number of pixels it needs to display. It's the device that needs the least amount of testing.

 

It's not retina, just like the 1st-gen isn't. You want uniformity of hardware, you'd have to develop for the 3rd-gen only.


Originally Posted by apple_badger View Post
…I think that Apple has learned to not try to shoe-horn an OS into a device that can't quite manage it. 

 

They just put a brand new OS into a phone that will be four years old when it stops receiving updates, breaking their old tradition of running three OS numbers per device…

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Meanwhile, the first-gen iPad… 

Agreed.  Why the iPad gen 1 was eliminated?  When Apple released iPhoto for the iPad, the first gen iPad was eliminated.  Yet I was able to get iPhoto on my first gen iPad and it worked fine.  So I know it wasn't a hardware matter.  I also think that if the iPhone 3gs can run iOS6 then the iPad first gen can run it as well cause the first gen iPad's hardware is better and more powerfull than the 3gs.

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post #22 of 43

One thing that I have a hard time believing is that people will avoid updating mobile devices to the latest OS (if it's supported on their device). Updating is the only way that Apple gives us to install fixes for security issues. We're talking about always on, always network connected computers that store *a lot* of personal information and come nicely equipped with cameras and microphones. Not having the latest software on them is kinda like using a computer with unpatched WinXP on the open Internet. 

post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

It's not retina, just like the 1st-gen isn't. You want uniformity of hardware, you'd have to develop for the 3rd-gen only.

 

 

They just put a brand new OS into a phone that will be four years old when it stops receiving updates, breaking their old tradition of running three OS numbers per device…

Like I said (and I is speculation), the amount of RAM required to support the display on the 1st gen iPad may be too much overhead to permit it to run iOS 6 effectively. The 1st gen iPand and the iPhone 3Gs both have 256GB RAM, but the iPad needs more of that for its display. 

post #24 of 43
That is pretty darn impressive.
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post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

 

As an app developer, I'm glad that the 1st gen iPad is getting dropped. It really holds back developers from making the most of the iPad 2 and 3. 

 

I fell sorry for active iPad 1 users but they must make up a pretty small percentage of all iPad users.

As an app purchaser, I wish there was a good way to manage and organize different versions of apps. Wife has an iPad 1 and we try to avoid updates to keep versioning harmony.

post #26 of 43
This is why I like Apple. I know that my device will be supported for my entire 3 year contract. Maybe that's why Apple has extended and decided to support the 3GS even though it is 4 generations behind. People were signing on to 3 year contracts (here in Canada) when the iPhone 4 came out and they feel that those devices are still widely in use for another year or so.
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

It's not retina, just like the 1st-gen isn't. You want uniformity of hardware, you'd have to develop for the 3rd-gen only.

 

Supporting retina and non-retina devices is easy - you can write a script that automates the entire process. Development is done in points (1 point = 1 pixel on non-retina, 1 point = 2 pixels on retina) so not a single line of code is different between screen resolutions. There's a bit more testing to do but I've never come across any major issues.

 

What's hard is working out how to optimise your app when it runs out of RAM. Sometimes it's an impossible task. Apple struggled themselves and that's why support they've dropped support for the iPad 1. 

 

The iPad 2 is actually easier than the iPad 3 to develop for. It's got more grunt per pixel pushed.

post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The iPhone 3GS got three major updates, extending its functional life past four years, an eternity in the tech world.
Being qualified for a major update is pretty rare under Android, with only some of the top selling new handsets ever getting a single major update after their release. A range of new Android phones continue to ship with Android 2.x, which was released in 2010 alongside iOS 4. Samsung's flagship Galaxy S III is just now getting the latest Android 4.1 Jelly Bean release in some countries, despite it being released months ago.
The situation for Android doesn't appear to be getting better. At the end of 2011, half of the installed base was on the year old 2.3 Gingerbread while another 35 percent were still on 2.2 Froyo from mid 2010. Just 11 percent were still running something older than the year and a half old Froyo release. Today, Google reports that less than 23 percent are on the year old 4.0 ICS or newer, while 57 percent are on Gingerbread (which is now older than Froyo was last winter). Over 18 percent of active users are on something older than the nearly two year old Gingerbread.
Google promised to improve the software release fragmentation on Android, but these numbers do not indicate progress but rather some pretty significant regression. Additionally, Google's clearly articulated commitment to delivering 18 months of updates for new phones has been ignored by its licensees, few of whom have released any major software updates for phone models that are just a year old.

Yes, but according to the Android shills here, that's just as good since you can still install at least some of the newer apps on your Froyo and Gingerbread systems. /s
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post #29 of 43
Is there a handy-dandy chart somewhere that details exactly what features of iOS 6 will and won't run on e 3GS, 4, and 4S? Oh, and while we're at it, the iPad 2, and New iPad (I notice passbook isn't on the iPad which is a shame since I tend to carry that around to Starbucks and the AirPort, etc. over my phone ...
post #30 of 43
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post
Is there a handy-dandy chart somewhere that details exactly what features of iOS 6 will and won't run on e 3GS, 4, and 4S? Oh, and while we're at it, the iPad 2, and New iPad (I notice passbook isn't on the iPad which is a shame since I tend to carry that around to Starbucks and the AirPort, etc. over my phone ...

 

Yep.

 

 

I think there's a more detailed one somewhere on here… I forget who posted it…

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #31 of 43
Ios6 killing off the ipad even though the 3gs is still getting some life out of it.... WTF apple......
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yep.



I think there's a more detailed one somewhere on here… I forget who posted it…

Thanks for that. Of course I am familiar with the disclaimers on the iOS 6 site, but I was hoping for a handy-dandy chart. I'm sure one will turn up sooner or later. Not urgent.
post #33 of 43
I learned something interesting today.

I use Straight Talk which required a jailbroken iPhone with iOS 5.1.1. I used Redsn0w to do so and had everything working fine.

However, I wanted to try iOS 6.0. I figured I could always go back to 5.1.1 if I had to. Unfortunately, I didn't read the jailbreaking sites carefully enough and thought that I could jailbreak my iPhone 4S. Unfortunately, after I started the process, I found that the jailbreak for iOS 6 only works for phones up to the iPhone 4. I went ahead so that I could pay with iOS 6 and then figured I'd revert back to 5.1.1.

I then tried a site which changes the APN settings on the iPhone to work with a wide variety of carriers (www.unlockit.co.nz/). With 5.1.1, this site didn't work for me. I used the site to change APN settings and I didn't have data access. With iOS 6, I tried the same site and it worked fine.

So, the process to get my iPhone 4S working with straight talk and iOS 6 was:
- Backup phone
- Install iOS 6 (you have to install it as a new phone)
- Disconnect phone
- Reconnect phone. It restores all my apps, photos, videos, data, etc.
- Use unlockit to change APN settings.

Everything is now working (including MMS which was a problem with 5.1.1).

For whatever reason, iOS 6 worked better with unlockit than 5.1.1 and I have a fully functional 4S on Straight Talk with no need to go back to 5.1.1. Unlike 5.1.1, I didn't need to jailbreak, either.
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post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Meanwhile, the first-gen iPad… 

 

I think its the small amount of RAM (256MB) with that big screen that did it in.  I remember when it came out thinking they should have gone for 512MB on it. 

 

Its a true classic though, like having an iPhone 1.

post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I learned something interesting today.
I use Straight Talk which required a jailbroken iPhone with iOS 5.1.1. I used Redsn0w to do so and had everything working fine.
......
.....
So, the process to get my iPhone 4S working with straight talk and iOS 6 was:
- Backup phone
- Install iOS 6 (you have to install it as a new phone)
- Disconnect phone
- Reconnect phone. It restores all my apps, photos, videos, data, etc.
- Use unlockit to change APN settings.
Everything is now working (including MMS which was a problem with 5.1.1).
For whatever reason, iOS 6 worked better with unlockit than 5.1.1 and I have a fully functional 4S on Straight Talk with no need to go back to 5.1.1. Unlike 5.1.1, I didn't need to jailbreak, either.

 

That's great news there jragosta, thanks - I'll be filing that for when I take v6.0 plunge. 

 

Just as an FYI, you could use Straight Talk with the 4S on iOS 5.1.x without jail breaking as well (just needed the temporary use of a U.S. T-mobile SIM to setup the MMS details).

 

I've wondered if the iPhone 5 on Straight Talk will get LTE with Straight Talk or if AT&T will keep that away from them...(straight talk uses the AT&T network).

post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yep.



I think there's a more detailed one somewhere on here… I forget who posted it…

In case anyone is interested ...

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5457?
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

Agreed.  Why the iPad gen 1 was eliminated?  When Apple released iPhoto for the iPad, the first gen iPad was eliminated.  Yet I was able to get iPhoto on my first gen iPad and it worked fine.  So I know it wasn't a hardware matter.  I also think that if the iPhone 3gs can run iOS6 then the iPad first gen can run it as well cause the first gen iPad's hardware is better and more powerfull than the 3gs.

 

The iPhone 3GS was just taken off the market so new buyers get some benefit going forward.  The iPad 1 has been off the market for a year and a half.  That may be part of the reason.  In the grand scheme of things, there a re probably very few compared to other models out there.  In the iPhone introduction they gave total iPad sales and over half of all sales over 2 and a bit years we sold during the April 2012 - June 2012 quarter.  47 million out of 82 million or so.

post #38 of 43

I was going to hold off upgrading to iOS6 on my 3GS but did and it seems even a little quicker.  Your mileage may vary.

post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Meanwhile, the first-gen iPad… 

 

First off, the original iPad hasn't been sold for over a year, while the iPhone 3GS just went off sale. 

 

Secondly, Apple sold a lot fewer iPads than the iPhone 3GS. 

 

Thirdly, if you compare iPad to other Tablets, at least you got continuous updates across 3 years. The Galaxy Tab that came out ~9 months after iPad didn't even get the Android 3 Honeycomb update that shipped a couple months after it did. And few tablets on any platform have ever gotten a full/significant update of any kind.

post #40 of 43
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
First off, the original iPad hasn't been sold for over a year, while the iPhone 3GS just went off sale. 

 

So what? The iPhone 3G shouldn't have received iOS 4 because it hadn't been on sale for a year? That what you're saying? Devices no longer for sale shouldn't get updates they're capable of running?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
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