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Ridiculed in the West, Apple's iOS 6 Maps are instead praised in China

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
While many around the world have slammed Apple's new mapping software in iOS 6, the company has built a special version of Maps for China that has been praised as a "huge improvement over Google Maps," though it lacks some new features due to Chinese laws.

China
Maps in China in iOS 6 (left) are more detailed than the previous Google Maps (right). Screenshots via Anthony Drendel.


Apple's Maps in China are more detailed than competitors thanks to data provided by AutoNavi Holdings, The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. It is the most widely used mobile mapping service in china, making navigation systems, virtual maps and satellite images.

However, Apple's special version of Maps in China does not integrate data from TomTom, which is used for mapping data around the world outside of China. As a result, Chinese users who want to look at other countries outside of their own cannot access landmarks or public transit stops.

Apple's unique-to-China maps also lack spoken turn-by-turn directions, or the 3D flyover feature that is available to other worldwide users on the iPhone 5, iPhone 4S and new iPad.

Instead, users in China can only access written directions, and satellite imagery for other countries is displayed in black.

The problem comes from the fact that only 11 companies in China have licenses to do comprehensive mapping, according to the Journal. Half of those companies only support the government and do not make commercial-level products.

Citing an unnamed source, Wednesday's report said that integrating AutoNavi apps from China with other data from around the world would be an incredibly complex undertaking, which is why the detailed mapping data is restricted to China.

China
Chinese iOS 6 users cannot access satellite imagery outside of China (as seen on the left). Screenshots via The Wall Street Journal.


Still, user Anthony Drendel wrote on his blog that iOS 6 Maps are "a huge improvement over Google Maps" for the 1.3 billion people who live in China. There, he said, Google Maps "was always pretty terrible."

"In the big cities and tourist centers, it was passable," he said. "once you left China's large metropolises, however, you were pretty much on your own."

But with the use of AutoNavi in China, iOS 6 Maps now have far greater detail than Google Maps provides. Google's hands are tied because the search company is not among the 11 mapping companies authorized by the Chinese government.

"In my experience, the new version of Maps zooms in much further, shows more points of interest, clearly labels banks and cellphone shops (China Mobile, China Unicom, and China Telecom), and gives the locations of ATMs and public restrooms (my original iPad running iOS 6 doesn't show either of those things)," Drendel wrote. "The killer feature, though, is that iOS Maps shows both English names and Chinese characters for everything, whereas Google-powered Maps only shows the English translation."

With the release of iOS 6 last week, Apple officially dropped Google Maps data for its built-in Maps application on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. Instead, the company how offers its own in-house solution that users have said is not as good as Google's offering found in previous releases of iOS.
post #2 of 40

Yes, but considering THIS happened there as well, does anyone really give a damn about China's opinions currently?

 

http://www.infowars.com/man-crushed-by-road-flattening-truck-on-orders-of-chinese-officials/

post #3 of 40
I wonder how many of those 1.3 billion people can actually afford iPhones?
post #4 of 40
I've been using iOS 6 maps for 3 days now and have had no problems. Everything has worked great and they are extremely fast. The detail isn%u2019t what Google Maps were but everything where I live is located where it should be.

I did have an occasion or two using Google Maps and they ended up taking me to incorrect places. Same with my Garmin. It took me to a remote mountain location once and I was lost for an hour.

Three days isn%u2019t much time using the maps but so far they%u2019ve been perfect for me. Again they are super fast and I%u2019m impressed with the speed in which they find things. The turn-by-turn works great. I%u2019m please with them and they will only get better during the next few months.
post #5 of 40
What's interesting to me is that the maps and satellite photos in Apple's maps are lined up, but the Google maps are not (Check Tienanmen Square in Beijing, for example). I was always told that was a rule for mapping in China-things must be slightly off. GPS is also supposed to be slightly off in China, too.

I used to live in Beijing and that was always slightly annoying, but the fact that it's fixed in Apple's maps makes me wonder who Google angered or who Apple bought...
post #6 of 40

Now all Apple has to do is get the iPhone available with the, by far, largest mobile provider in China (China Mobile, has about 650 million subscribers or so) and they might be able to make some hay out of this.

 

Apple is hoping to ink a deal in the spring of 2013 - they didn't have a phone that worked on the China mobile tech previously (I believe).
 

post #7 of 40

Wait a minute, the guy Drendel mentions "my original iPad running iOS 6"???

post #8 of 40

Now we know why Timmy Cook was wearing a suit and posing with Chinese bureaucrats not long ago.

post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sasparilla View Post

Now all Apple has to do is get the iPhone available with the, by far, largest mobile provider in China (China Mobile, has about 650 million subscribers or so) and they might be able to make some hay out of this.

Apple is hoping to ink a deal in the spring of 2013 - they didn't have a phone that worked on the China mobile tech previously (I believe). 

Right around 700 million now. They show 693 million for the end of August and have been adding about 6-7 million per month for awhile now.

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post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalmanPak View Post

I wonder how many of those 1.3 billion people can actually afford iPhones?

Does it matter really? That's their problem.

 

There are plenty of people in this country (USA) who are unemployed/semi-employed or just plain broke and probably can't afford an iPhone either. You don't have to go all the way to China to find people who can't afford an iPhone.

post #11 of 40
You know, China might have been a big part of why Apple dumped Google maps.

Google is not going to do well in China -- is not an authorized mapper in China -- and i would be surprised if they would pay for anyone else's mapping data.

Apple may have decided to build and buy their own mapping services to make iPhone better for Chinese consumers.
post #12 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple  View Post

Does it matter really? That's their problem.
No, it doesn't matter. But when the news is favorable, they change the subject.
post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Right around 700 million now. They show 693 million for the end of August and have been adding about 6-7 million per month for awhile now.

I have to wonder if they're providing numbers via the Samsung protocol - make them up and don't worry about the errors until you get caught.

That number means that more than 50% of every single man, woman, and child in China is a China Mobile subscriber. I just have a hard time believing that.
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post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I have to wonder if they're providing numbers via the Samsung protocol - make them up and don't worry about the errors until you get caught.
That number means that more than 50% of every single man, woman, and child in China is a China Mobile subscriber. I just have a hard time believing that.

Many countries have over 100% saturation of cellphones compared to the total number of citizens so I don't think 50% for a country that likely has a lot of cheap pre-paid subscribers is enough to question its legitimacy. I'd question it more just because it's China.

Regardless, the market for iPhones in China seems absolutely immense so I wouldn't be surprised to see the iPhone 5 be announced for early next year for the Chinese New Year (or some other year around that time as there production starts to overtake their ability to sell the device).

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post #15 of 40

Ahhh, I see. 

 

So all the work actually went into getting iOS Maps to work right in China first

 

Clever.

post #16 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalmanPak View Post

I wonder how many of those 1.3 billion people can actually afford iPhones?

I'm sorry but your lack of knowledge of the world is showing.

Tens of millions already own iPhones in China and there are hundreds of millions that can afford one. There are now over 230 million Chinese middle class, plus hundreds of millions more young adults living at home that spend a disproportionate amount of their income on "luxury goods" because of their high savings rate and low living expenses. Even China Mobile, on which the iPhone only works on their 2G network due to incompatibility with their 3G standard, has over 15 million iPhone users.
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post

Yes, but considering THIS happened there as well, does anyone really give a damn about China's opinions currently?

http://www.infowars.com/man-crushed-by-road-flattening-truck-on-orders-of-chinese-officials/

Please keep your politics off this site. Should we know start a discussion of the number of innocent people executed in Texas?
post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/152885/ridiculed-in-the-west-apples-ios-6-maps-are-instead-praised-in-china#post_2198308"]Does it matter really? That's their problem.

There are plenty of people in this country (USA) who are unemployed/semi-employed or just plain broke and probably can't afford an iPhone either. You don't have to go all the way to China to find people who can't afford an iPhone.

Since there is a Free model and a $99 model, not to mention a huge used iphone market, and since they are in fact handheld computers that are much more than a phone, that theory really doesn't hold water.
post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I have to wonder if they're providing numbers via the Samsung protocol - make them up and don't worry about the errors until you get caught.
That number means that more than 50% of every single man, woman, and child in China is a China Mobile subscriber. I just have a hard time believing that.

As an expat living in China I can verify through personal observation and experience that these numbers are valid. It is far easier to get a mobile phone than a landline in China and just about everyone has one. It is also much less expensive to build out wireless infrastructure in developing countries / areas than to put in landlines. Plans are extremely cheap here as are the available phones - my mid-level voice and data plan I use with my iPhone is only $15 USD per month with China Unicom. And there are much less expensive plans available.
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmason View Post

Wait a minute, the guy Drendel mentions "my original iPad running iOS 6"???

Perhaps he meant "my first iPad" which is an iPad 2 - not "the original iPad" which of course cannot run iOS 6 - unless there is a jailbreak that allows it. 

 

I am sure China will allow satellite imagery of more parts of the world, as soon as they are taken over by the Chinese military, hmmm, islands in the south sea was it, and Taiwan, next Japan...

post #21 of 40
I'm in china and I can confirm one thing apple standard maps show more data than google maps in standard view. But google maps had satellite view in my area whereas apple maps doesn't have satellite view. In fact if I zoom out enough in street view it shows only a big forest.

So now I know why I couldn't find any 3d flyover view even when I'm trying to look something in US. It's cos they are using autonavi in china and tom tom and others all over the world.

my way or the highway...

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post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post

Yes, but considering THIS happened there as well, does anyone really give a damn about China's opinions currently?

 

http://www.infowars.com/man-crushed-by-road-flattening-truck-on-orders-of-chinese-officials/

That's been going around. It's fake. Could've easily taken video since all cameras have video. 

post #23 of 40

I agree, the maps are definitely better than GM in China, a significant improvement.

 

Maps are much more detailed and search is more reliable. They are also more up to date both in the map and the satellite images for most cities I have checked in China. The GPS is also less 'offset', this might be useful if I ever need to use the find my phone feature as google maps could be up to 1/2km off at times, making it absolutely useless on GM. This may help make up for the lack of turn by turn, 3d or the limitation of Siri here (still a very reduced feature set).

 

In response to JRagosta, China Mobile is very much the dominant mobile telecoms provider and has the best coverage outside of the cities but has been losing customers to the other two major players China Unicom and China Telecom because it does not sell the iPhone and can only offer a 2G service to iPhone users at present. As another poster pointed out this has not stopped over 15m users from using the iPhone on China Mobile. The main reason for this is that unlike most European countries, it is not possible to port numbers from one provider to another. This means that it is not uncommon for people to have two or more phones to keep numbers active nut to benefit from the strengths of different providers. It also explains why dual sim mobiles are popular over here.

 

I have mentioned in previous posts that at lot of our Chinese staff have iPhones and iPads even though they are paid a much lower wage than what would be considered normal in Western countries. They are still paid the market rate for the region plus bonus so have a reasonable disposable income compared to their peers. It should also be noted that mobile phones are higher up the economic priority list for a lot of Chinese people.

 

I can only recommend that anyone posting political comments on here that have not yet had the opportunity to visit China yet come and see it for yourself. It is an amazing, place full of wonderful individuals of great character and humour. It is also frustrating and different at times and has some glaring imperfections but that can be said of anywhere in the world. Please bear in a country of 1.3billion people there are are going to be some poor representatives of humanity we are all influenced by our environment.

 

Sorry to post a long one but thank you Apple my maps app is definitely an improvement in China, I hope that you can sort out the UK and Europe before I travel over there in November! lol.gif  

 

 

 
post #24 of 40
I couldn't disagree more! It seems that the balance for the new iOS 6 maps is positive for those who live in China. It may even sound credible if you stay in China and don not travel abroad, right?

In fact, it is not right.

In fact, is worse than it looks. All apps use iOS native maps; meaning that if you are using apps that provide any geopositioning ( eg. following friends through Latitude, having tracking utilities to recover lost devices, ....) abroad, you are left with nothing; and there is no way to solve that.

Apple crippled so many useful apps!! (for those living in China)

I am really disappointed. It happened again, before MobileMe and now this! And what is worse; it proves that customers are not in the center of Apple's strategy anymore!!

The balance for iOS 6 new maps in China can not be a positive one; and -if you allow me to say so- that is what it seems from your post.
post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalmanPak View Post

I wonder how many of those 1.3 billion people can actually afford iPhones?

 

More than in the US

post #26 of 40
Probably you are right. I live in Beijing and travel often to many other major Chinese cities, and iPhone success is absolutely stunning!
post #27 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post


As an expat living in China I can verify through personal observation and experience that these numbers are valid. It is far easier to get a mobile phone than a landline in China and just about everyone has one. It is also much less expensive to build out wireless infrastructure in developing countries / areas than to put in landlines. Plans are extremely cheap here as are the available phones - my mid-level voice and data plan I use with my iPhone is only $15 USD per month with China Unicom. And there are much less expensive plans available.

 

I agree. Pretty much everyone living in the cities here will have a mobile phone (including the migrant workers making just $100 US/month). A mobile phone really is considered a necessity over here, and can also be status symbol. I have posted about this before - if you're interested you can take a look at my past posts.

post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by festerfeet View Post

The main reason for this is that unlike most European countries, it is not possible to port numbers from one provider to another. This means that it is not uncommon for people to have two or more phones to keep numbers active nut to benefit from the strengths of different providers. It also explains why dual sim mobiles are popular over here.

 

I have mentioned in previous posts that at lot of our Chinese staff have iPhones and iPads even though they are paid a much lower wage than what would be considered normal in Western countries. They are still paid the market rate for the region plus bonus so have a reasonable disposable income compared to their peers. It should also be noted that mobile phones are higher up the economic priority list for a lot of Chinese people.

 

That's a good point - it is normal for business people here to have more than one mobile phone/number. China Mobile also has some of the cheapest pre-paid "plans", which would also explain their popularity.

 

To give you an idea of the costs here: I myself am on China Mobile with a pre-paid account. I have signed up for a couple of monthly "packages" - for 5 RMB ($0.79 US)/month I get unlimited free incoming calls and outgoing calls at a reduced rate (I don't remember exactly what the rate is but it's around 0.25 RMB/minute which is $0.04 US/minute). For an additional 10 RMB ($1.57 US)/month, I get 30MB of 2G data.

 

The low service rates explains why so many people here can afford to have a mobile phone - unlike in North America, the greatest cost is actually the phone (most people I know here change phones on a yearly basis).

 

I will end this post by saying that the Chinese really know how to save - I know people here making a decent salary (for China - around $1000 US/month) who take the bus rather than the subway because the former is 1.2 RMB ($0.19 US) cheaper per trip! These savings then go towards the purchase of prestige items such as iPhones, iPads, cars, etc.

post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eduard View Post

I couldn't disagree more! It seems that the balance for the new iOS 6 maps is positive for those who live in China. It may even sound credible if you stay in China and don not travel abroad, right?
In fact, it is not right.
In fact, is worse than it looks. All apps use iOS native maps; meaning that if you are using apps that provide any geopositioning ( eg. following friends through Latitude, having tracking utilities to recover lost devices, ....) abroad, you are left with nothing; and there is no way to solve that.
Apple crippled so many useful apps!! (for those living in China)
I am really disappointed. It happened again, before MobileMe and now this! And what is worse; it proves that customers are not in the center of Apple's strategy anymore!!
The balance for iOS 6 new maps in China can not be a positive one; and -if you allow me to say so- that is what it seems from your post.

 

Latitude may be a problem but I don't have recent experience (I find it a little spooky but that is personal taste). Latitude access, like a lot of google services used to pretty spotty anyway, pretty much all Google apps are unreliable since they moved their servers to Japan unless you turn on your VPN. Google did have a licensing issues with maps and from what little I know about the situation, it does not seem that their service in China is going to improve without an about turn in a number of official policies and regulations (so probably quite a while) 
 
Geo-positioning outside of China seems to work fine for the Chinese user, I have just managed to 'find a friend' in the UK and it seems to have found him exactly where I expected him to be. I have yet to test it overseas but will have that opportunity to do so over the weekend. 
I can't agree with you regarding mobile me, that was a mess right from the start and should have been killed off earlier, it was useful to and used by a small percentage of IOS users because of it's limitations and idiosyncrasies. Apple made that decision it seems, only once it had deliberated the consequences and came up with something that it felt suited a wider audience of it's customers. It also gave those same users plenty of time to find other solutions and transfer across if they needed some of the features available from Mobile Me. 
 
What I do find weird is that a colleague who has update his iPhone bought in the UK but located in China does not get the Navi maps but the Tom Tom maps of china which are very limited. Whereas my phone was from the states updated to IOS 6 on the same day, both from the UK app store and it has the same location settings as far as we can ascertain. That is just weird! 
 
 
 
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by festerfeet View Post
What I do find weird is that a colleague who has update his iPhone bought in the UK but located in China does not get the Navi maps but the Tom Tom maps of china which are very limited. Whereas my phone was from the states updated to IOS 6 on the same day, both from the UK app store and it has the same location settings as far as we can ascertain. That is just weird! 
 

 

Are both of your phones using the same language settings?

 

There was an interesting behaviour pre-iOS 5 - iPhones purchased in China were showing different maps data vs. iPhones purchased elsewhere. The most obvious was that all the map names were in Chinese (instead of English), however there were also some interesting differences regarding disputed territories. It turned out that iOS was using the hardware version to determine which maps data to use (in either case the data was still coming from Google), however some clever folks figured out how to force their jailbroken iPhones to use the international maps data.

 

However, in iOS 5 the behaviour was changed so that the language setting was used to determine which maps data to use. This was a relief to many expats in China.

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AIA View Post

 

Are both of your phones using the same language settings?

 

There was an interesting behaviour pre-iOS 5 - iPhones purchased in China were showing different maps data vs. iPhones purchased elsewhere. The most obvious was that all the map names were in Chinese (instead of English), however there were also some interesting differences regarding disputed territories. It turned out that iOS was using the hardware version to determine which maps data to use (in either case the data was still coming from Google), however some clever folks figured out how to force their jailbroken iPhones to use the international maps data.

 

However, in iOS 5 the behaviour was changed so that the language setting was used to determine which maps data to use. This was a relief to many expats in China.

 

Yep, both phones are using the same location and language settings, the only differences are one is a 4 the other is a 4s and one was from the US and the other from the UK. Both were updated over there air so couldn't have been affected by any settings on iTunes on our respective machines, we are at a loss to explain. My colleague is considering a reinstall but as his 5 is now in China and should be with him in a few days, I am not sure this is a priority for him unless the problem is duplicated in his 5 which once again was bought in the UK.   
 
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by festerfeet View Post

Yep, both phones are using the same location and language settings, the only differences are one is a 4 the other is a 4s and one was from the US and the other from the UK. Both were updated over there air so couldn't have been affected by any settings on iTunes on our respective machines, we are at a loss to explain. My colleague is considering a reinstall but as his 5 is now in China and should be with him in a few days, I am not sure this is a priority for him unless the problem is duplicated in his 5 which once again was bought in the UK.   

 

 

That's odd, could you report back on how your friend's 5 behaves? I just updated my 3GS (HK) to iOS 6 and will try out the maps tonight and will report back. I will also try out my 5 (Canada) when I get it next week. My wife has a 4 (Canada), however I have not gotten around to upgrading it yet (she doesn't like it when I mess around with her phone).

post #33 of 40
Quote:
Citing an unnamed source, Wednesday's report said that integrating AutoNavi apps from China with other data from around the world would be an incredibly complex undertaking, which is why the detailed mapping data is restricted to China.

 

 

Why would it be that difficult.  Surely it's not necessary to integrate both datasets, just to let AutoNavi handle everything inside China's territory and use TomTom for the rest.  What happened to using OpenStreetMap by the way.  It's licensed for iPhoto.  Wouldn't this be a quick way to integrate lots of data that Google doesn't currently have (such as public footpaths) that are much more important in European mapping.

post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by webweasel View Post

 

 

Why would it be that difficult.  Surely it's not necessary to integrate both datasets, just to let AutoNavi handle everything inside China's territory and use TomTom for the rest.  What happened to using OpenStreetMap by the way.  It's licensed for iPhoto.  Wouldn't this be a quick way to integrate lots of data that Google doesn't currently have (such as public footpaths) that are much more important in European mapping.

FWIW TomTom also is partnered with AutoNavi in China. Apparently TT lacks the appropriate security clearance from Chinese officials to serve up mapping to Apple for that region, pushing Apple to deal with AutoNavi directly. With that said, there's reports of map issues in China that Autonavi is blaming on TomTom anyway. 

 

"AutoNavi, the Chinese company that's providing Apple's maps for China and some other parts of Asia -- has been less quiet, though. It has responded to Chinese user complaints by saying that there is nothing wrong with the AutoNavi Maps product, and the reason for the issues people have experienced is that apparently, the upgrade to iOS 6 has caused some users to be unable to connect to the AutoNavi service. Their maps of China, then, are being served by Tomtom, and that's where the mistakes are coming from."

 

  1. Close the Maps app
  2. Set your system time to seven days in the future. (So if today is Sept. 25, set it for Oct. 2)
  3. Reset the phone
  4. Open Maps, if the Autonavi logo appears in the bottom right, you're all set.

 

 

http://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/chinas-autonavi-responds-apple-maps-161039686.html

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post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AIA View Post

 

That's odd, could you report back on how your friend's 5 behaves? I just updated my 3GS (HK) to iOS 6 and will try out the maps tonight and will report back. I will also try out my 5 (Canada) when I get it next week. My wife has a 4 (Canada), however I have not gotten around to upgrading it yet (she doesn't like it when I mess around with her phone).

 

I checked with my 3GS (HK) running iOS 6, mine is using Autonavi data for China and there is no satellite data outside of China. Map data outside of China (at least for North America) is quite mediocre - in fact I just found and reported a problem with a mislabeled highway.

post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by webweasel View Post

Why would it be that difficult.  Surely it's not necessary to integrate both datasets, just to let AutoNavi handle everything inside China's territory and use TomTom for the rest.  What happened to using OpenStreetMap by the way.  It's licensed for iPhoto.  Wouldn't this be a quick way to integrate lots of data that Google doesn't currently have (such as public footpaths) that are much more important in European mapping.

 

I too don't see how it that would be difficult. In fact, I'm currently in China and when I click on the "Data from Autonavi, others" I can see that it's already getting maps data from other sources for Australia and New Zealand:

 

http://gspa21.ls.apple.com/html/attribution.cn.html

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

FWIW TomTom also is partnered with AutoNavi in China. Apparently TT lacks the appropriate security clearance from Chinese officials to serve up mapping to Apple for that region, pushing Apple to deal with AutoNavi directly. With that said, there's reports of map issues in China that Autonavi is blaming on TomTom anyway. 

 

"AutoNavi, the Chinese company that's providing Apple's maps for China and some other parts of Asia -- has been less quiet, though. It has responded to Chinese user complaints by saying that there is nothing wrong with the AutoNavi Maps product, and the reason for the issues people have experienced is that apparently, the upgrade to iOS 6 has caused some users to be unable to connect to the AutoNavi service. Their maps of China, then, are being served by Tomtom, and that's where the mistakes are coming from."

 

  1. Close the Maps app
  2. Set your system time to seven days in the future. (So if today is Sept. 25, set it for Oct. 2)
  3. Reset the phone
  4. Open Maps, if the Autonavi logo appears in the bottom right, you're all set.

 

 

http://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/chinas-autonavi-responds-apple-maps-161039686.html

 

This sounds like the problem that festerfest's friend is experiencing.

post #38 of 40
What Drendel says about Google Maps ("...Google-powered Maps only shows the English translation.") is wrong. On my iOS 5 Maps app, using the English interface, place names for places in China are bilingual (Chinese/ English) and fully searcheable in either language. If I switch to the Chinese interface, place names in China are in Chinese only and place names outside China are represented either in a bilingual format (local language/ Chinese), or - if you drill down to street level - in the local language only. I like Google's integrated approach and hope that Apple's Maps app will develop into a similar integrated direction, notwithstanding the technical challenges involved.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post


Please keep your politics off this site. Should we know start a discussion of the number of innocent people executed in Texas?

 

 

Or the over 30, 000 people convicted based on fraudulent evidence

post #40 of 40

Since there are expats here...did Apple ever make Baidu the default search engine in China as was rumored earlier this year? 

 

My understanding is that the Baidu maps are pretty good and the navinfo dataset none too shabby.

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