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Disagreements over turn-by-turn directions prompted Apple to ditch Google Maps - Page 2

post #41 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

So, essentially, Apple wasn't willing to negotiate anything, which proves me right, this was done for political reasons alone, not concern for the customers.

Sometimes it's better not to make a deal with the devil. Apple obviously decided that they had more to lose than gain from capitulating to Google's demands.

 

Apple made the right choice. It's better not to be held hostage.

post #42 of 89
That decision is a lost for Google Places advertisers and Google mobile ads future. Most people are using their phones to fine places (kind of a mobile yellow pages) so that's some 50 millions less ppc for Goolge.
post #43 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

There actually is a solution for this: buy velcro stickers and an iPad case; glue the stickers to your dashboard and case, and drop the iPad case on them. When you park, just remove the iPad and store it in the glovebox. You can use the lighter adapter to power the iPad, so it can stay always on displaying Google Maps, and you don't need to tap a button on the screen since you can center the screen in your current position and follow the blue line (or find your way back to it, or reset directions, if for some reason you miss an exit).

Aside from one little problem - that's illegal in many (if not most) jurisdictions. Blocking portions of the windshield (aside from a few inches around the edges) is a no-no. Not to mention incredibly unsafe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

So, essentially, Apple wasn't willing to negotiate anything, which proves me right, this was done for political reasons alone, not concern for the customers.

As usual, your hatred of Apple is making you irrational (or vice versa).

Where did it say that Apple refused to negotiate? It simply said that Apple would not agree to what Google asked. That's a VERY different matter.
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post #44 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Turn by turn on an iOS device is not that useful. Unless you have dedicated mounting brackets in your auto so that the device is more at eye level, using turn by turn and looking down at the device sitting on the passenger seat or holding your phone while driving is a dangerous habit to get into. Personally, I have built in navigation in all my autos so I don't need it at all. I can see a case for all vehicles having built in navigation within the next 5 years or so. Perhaps this new Apple Maps service is the precursor to striking a deal with auto makers to provide built in iOS devices in the cars..

 

I got this one for $20.   Works perfectly with iP5 and is easily removable.   

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007FHX9OK/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i01

post #45 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

In general, there's some truth to that.
HOWEVER, when Apple refuses to license its core technologies, they're not screwing their own users. They're keeping the competition from getting Apple technologies. Google, OTOH, by refusing to release a good Maps app for iOS or license the technology to Apple is screwing their own users.
Besides which, Google didn't have to be Apple's competitor. Apple was apparently quite happy with partnering with Google until Google copied all of their technologies and set themselves up as a competitor (even though Google is apparently making less money than they would have if they had never gotten into the Android thing at all).
Essentially, Google invited a good friend over for dinner, stabbed him in the back and then said "I'm not going to help you because you're bleeding all over my living room".

Apple isn't totally innocent either. Their terms were too much for Google to accept. I don't believe Google set out to screw its iOS users they just preferred not to get screwed themselves.
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post #46 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Turn by turn on an iOS device is not that useful. Unless you have dedicated mounting brackets in your auto so that the device is more at eye level, using turn by turn and looking down at the device sitting on the passenger seat or holding your phone while driving is a dangerous habit to get into. Personally, I have built in navigation in all my autos so I don't need it at all. I can see a case for all vehicles having built in navigation within the next 5 years or so. Perhaps this new Apple Maps service is the precursor to striking a deal with auto makers to provide built in iOS devices in the cars..


It worked fine for me the other day. My phone was in my cup holder. Well, between the cups, in an extra space. First time I'd used navigation on phone or any other device.

 

It worked out great!

 

P

post #47 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Apple isn't totally innocent either. Their terms were too much for Google to accept. I don't believe Google set out to screw its iOS users they just preferred not to get screwed themselves.

I didn't say Apple was innocent. You see, unlike you, I don't express opinions on things when I don't have sufficient facts to reach a reasonable conclusion.

Since you're so sure Apple's terms were too much for Google to accept and Apple is not innocent, why don't you tell us exactly what terms Apple offered and exactly what terms Google wanted?
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post #48 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/152914/disagreements-over-turn-by-turn-directions-prompted-apple-to-ditch-google-maps/40#post_2199097"]Sometimes it's better not to make a deal with the devil. Apple obviously decided that they had more to lose than gain from capitulating to Google's demands.

Apple made the right choice. It's better not to be held hostage.

Would you allow someone to take credit for all your hard work?
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post #49 of 89
Google Maps SUCKS on the iPhone. No turn by turn and you had to manually cycle waypoints. The Android solution was much nicer. Apple did GREAT pulling the plug on Google. Apple will continue to refine the maps and it will end up a killer solution. Rome wasn't built in a day and this is a big project. Apple will get it right. As it is now the turn by turn Nav is AWESOME and if we still had to rely on google maps as a solution we wouldn't have this. Google was screwing Apple and iOS users with a subpar product. Apple will fix that issue and give us what we deserve. Buh bye Google!!!!!! Get off my phone if you can't give me the BEST. I don't want a lesser than Android product. Buh bye. 100 million iPhone user no longer using Google maps.....YIKES!
post #50 of 89
I think we will end up seeing this as a brilliant strategic move by Apple. Google I'm sure was planning to gain as much leverage from maps as they could. By converting early, Apple caught google flat footed without an app, and gained a head start on improving their service and getting people to use it by default, for at least a few months. This will allow them to get their maps as close to google's by the time google releases it, so most people will likely not switch back. That is all Apple has to do to win this gambit, and I believe they will.

They will have a huge opportunity to prove themselves and leverage their huge user base to refine their system. If there was a google maps app from day 1 of apple maps, many more people would have used it instead, since they were familiar with it already. This gets users familiar with apple maps, and buys them time to improve and add additional features and integration ahead of google's release.

At the very least, I think this forces google to provide their best maps features with basically zero bargaining leverage, or else risk losing millions of users to Apple. And Apple can still protect users' privacy. But hopefully, they will be able to match and exceed google's offering soon.
post #51 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Aside from one little problem - that's illegal in many (if not most) jurisdictions. Blocking portions of the windshield (aside from a few inches around the edges) is a no-no. Not to mention incredibly unsafe.

I don't see why you'd be required to block any parts of the windshield in order to do that; also, velcro is extremely resistant to coplanar forces.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

As usual, your hatred of Apple is making you irrational (or vice versa).

Where did it say that Apple refused to negotiate? It simply said that Apple would not agree to what Google asked. That's a VERY different matter.

In the original article that you obviously did not read, so here's the quote below:
Quote:
And if there were terms under which it might have agreed to do so, Apple wasn’t offering them. Sources tell AllThingsD that Google, for example, wanted more say in the iOS maps feature set. It wasn’t happy simply providing back-end data. It asked for in-app branding. Apple declined. It suggested adding Google Latitude. Again, Apple declined.

Don't call me a hater just because I do not adhere to your gullible fanboyism.
post #52 of 89
I'm honestly not sure who is being more unreasonable. A pox on both of them. I think Google shades Apple for the stupidity prize simply because of the penny-wise, pound-foolish attitude to exclusivity. What's really important is exclusivity of the crowd-sourced data and Google, unbelievably, forgot that in this case. They will regret it. Just like GLONASS with GPS, there's now a second player in town, only this time it comes with a huge amount of advertising dollars attached. I find it remarkable that Google would get so hung up on the end product that they'd forget to protect their basic business model like this.
post #53 of 89
Would also seem to suggest that Google, in positioning Android for wider acceptance vis-a-vie a competitive advantage, intentionally or unintentionally placed iPhone users in harms way during any driving activity.
post #54 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

I do not believe this. I mean, look, if Google ever make a Maps App for iOS, there will be turn-by-turn navigation. So, what's the point for google to hold it back? No point.

It's more believable that Apple axed the old Maps App because Google wants the data wired to them in a certain way and Apple thinks that'd give Google too much advantage. It's ok to axe it because of competitive reasons, I don't blame Apple. But I don't buy this turn-by-turn thing, and the facts will confirm what I said once Google finally releases a Maps App for iOS with turn-by-turn navigation.

Spoken turn by turn navigation can't have ad's. And that's why it isn't in Googles interest to support it on another platform.
On Android it's ok, because it attracts customers to Google (so they can see the ad's via other apps).
Now that Apple has spoken turn by turn navigation, Google probably will create a maps app that also includes this feature as a damage control measure.

J.
post #55 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


In general, there's some truth to that.
HOWEVER, when Apple refuses to license its core technologies, they're not screwing their own users. They're keeping the competition from getting Apple technologies. Google, OTOH, by refusing to release a good Maps app for iOS or license the technology to Apple is screwing their own users.
Besides which, Google didn't have to be Apple's competitor. Apple was apparently quite happy with partnering with Google until Google copied all of their technologies and set themselves up as a competitor (even though Google is apparently making less money than they would have if they had never gotten into the Android thing at all).
Essentially, Google invited a good friend over for dinner, stabbed him in the back and then said "I'm not going to help you because you're bleeding all over my living room".

 

Good point. 

post #56 of 89

I do wish that Apple had partnered with Garmin instead of Tom Tom.  Just a personal preference.  Google was incredibly STUPID to not give iOS users turn by turn.  Even if Google does a stand alone application with turn by turn and Apple accepts the application there is NO WAY I will install it or use it......I want a NATIVE solution as included in iOS and a Google band aid stand alone application is not acceptable to me.......so buh bye Google YOU BLEW IT!

post #57 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

I don't see why you'd be required to block any parts of the windshield in order to do that; also, velcro is extremely resistant to coplanar forces.

Sorry - you said to stick the iPad to the dashboard and I read it as windshield. That's still a safety problem because it takes your eyes off the road. And for most cars, if you can even find a place on the dashboard large enough for an iPad, it's pretty far from the driver.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

In the original article that you obviously did not read, so here's the quote below:
Don't call me a hater just because I do not adhere to your gullible fanboyism.

Really? Read what the article says:
"And if there were terms under which it might have agreed to do so, Apple wasn’t offering them. Sources tell AllThingsD that Google, for example, wanted more say in the iOS maps feature set. It wasn’t happy simply providing back-end data. It asked for in-app branding. Apple declined. It suggested adding Google Latitude. Again, Apple declined."

Google asked for Apple to do something that Apple considered to be unreasonable. So how in the world do you conclude that it's all Apple's fault? And, more reasonably (although expecting reasonableness from you is like expecting pigs to fly), why in the world should Apple allow Google to control Apple's own products?
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post #58 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Google asked for Apple to do something that Apple considered to be unreasonable. So how in the world do you conclude that it's all Apple's fault? And, more reasonably (although expecting reasonableness from you is like expecting pigs to fly), why in the world should Apple allow Google to control Apple's own products?

Because, as stated in the article, Apple did not offer terms of their own, they just passive-aggressively refused everything Google suggested. Essentially, Apple wanted the feature without giving anything in return.
post #59 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I didn't say Apple was innocent. You see, unlike you, I don't express opinions on things when I don't have sufficient facts to reach a reasonable conclusion.
Since you're so sure Apple's terms were too much for Google to accept and Apple is not innocent, why don't you tell us exactly what terms Apple offered and exactly what terms Google wanted?

You didn't say they were guilty either. You just insinuated that Google set out to deliberately screw it's iOS users. I don't know the exact terms but when was the last time Apple made an agreement that didn't heavily favor them?
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post #60 of 89
By by google maps. I'm happy to be patient with Apple Map app and see where it goes. Very happy to have a free turn-by-turn navigation app that's Apple's own creation.
post #61 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

I hope Apple ensures Google go through intense review for the proposed Google Maps standalone app and in the mean time improve their Maps App and say a big FU to Google. 100 Million customers no longer using your app,is not a small number.

Google can not longer hold Apple to ransom and thats what Page and the gang were trying to do.
Not just '100 million,' but likely the highest income segment customers of anyone/anywhere on the globe. It's suicidal to give that up, especially when monetizing mobile is where the future is for companies like GOOG and FB. (As an aside, I don't know anyone who's halfway well-off -- who also is not an Apple-hater -- that's an Android user).

That is what is strange. Is the tail (Motorola android device sales) wagging the dog (google ad sales to the most desirable demographic group)? It seems like a bad choice, based upon recent data.
post #62 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Because, as stated in the article, Apple did not offer terms of their own, they just passive-aggressively refused everything Google suggested. Essentially, Apple wanted the feature without giving anything in return.

That's not even close to what it said. It said that Apple was not offering terms that Google would agree to. So why is it Apple's fault?

And I'm still waiting for you to show exactly what Apple offered and what Google offered. You're so convinced that the problems are Apple's fault that you must know those things, right?
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

You didn't say they were guilty either. You just insinuated that Google set out to deliberately screw it's iOS users. I don't know the exact terms but when was the last time Apple made an agreement that didn't heavily favor them?

Again, you don't have any idea what was offered by either party, so please stop pretending that you know who is 'at fault' here.

As for Google screwing its iOS users, that's obvious. The iOS app has been missing features for years.
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post #63 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Yesterday I criticized Apple, but today I'm going to criticize Google, based on this new information.

 

Google basically told all Apple users to go and F*ck themselves. No, we will not provide voice guided navigation for Apple users, we want it exclusively for Fandroids. Apple users have to look at their screens while driving, and if they crash their cars and die, then too bad.

 

And remember, Google Maps app on iOS was also not vector based.

 

So then Apple told Google to go F*ck themselves, because Apple realized that they had no choice but to release their own Maps app.

 

The Apple Maps app has a very strong foundation, it's fast, it's smooth and it's vector based. As the Apple map app improves, with more and better data, then it will be quite good. Soon, 99% of all normal people, besides a few moronic Fandroids, will have forgotten all about Map-Gate, just as people have forgotten about all of the other "Gates" that came before that.


Odds are that Apple simply didn't want to pay a premium price for the feature.  Google has never been one to hold out on features, rather just to charge alot for the 'premium' features. 

 

I'm sure that if Apple really wanted to include the feature, they could have through some concessions.  Or they could have hit up Garmian, or Nokia, or someone else many years ago to provide it. 

 

Apple is simply about control - moreso than any other company I've seen.

post #64 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

As for Google screwing its iOS users, that's obvious. The iOS app has been missing features for years.

 

The iOS app was made by Apple, using Google's back-end data.  Any inadequacies in the app would fall on Apple's shoulders...

 

If Apple had really wanted to, there were also other providers of mapping data that I'm sure they could have hit up. 

post #65 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSheldon View Post

I'm sure it could have been brokered if the price were right- not that Apple is hurting for cash. And I'm sure that Apple saves tons of cash by using their own Map App.
Too bad for us purchasers of high end hardware now have to deal with a lower end Map software. Should have been extended a year as its clearly barely a beta.

No loss dude, there are many map apps available.

 

For me I use a local map which is more detailed than goog map and more useful too with building names and house numbers.

 

I am not so mentally challenged as to consult a map when i go for a walk nor do I need street view which is very old.

post #66 of 89

Turn by turn navigation is, and was already available on the iPhone by many different app vendors, so this argument doesn't make sense.  The other app vendors have better solutions than Apple's sad attempt with Maps in iOS 6.

post #67 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by replicant View Post

Apple should have implemented its own MAP solution years ago when they heard that Google was going to encroach on their turf and build a mobile phone which is similar in design.
With so much cash in hand, Apple should have invested in building its own services and don't let Google snap up all the great app developers one by one.

That is what Apple did.  They took years to develop the app now featured in iOS 6.  So after years of development, you got an app that has less features than the one it replaced.  Apple used their cash to acquire a variety of map service companies.  Their app didn't take a day to develop, although it functions like an app that only took a day.

post #68 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

I do not believe this. I mean, look, if Google ever make a Maps App for iOS, there will be turn-by-turn navigation. So, what's the point for google to hold it back? No point.

 

It's more believable that Apple axed the old Maps App because Google wants the data wired to them in a certain way and Apple thinks that'd give Google too much advantage. It's ok to axe it because of competitive reasons, I don't blame Apple. But I don't buy this turn-by-turn thing, and the facts will confirm what I said once Google finally releases a Maps App for iOS with turn-by-turn navigation.

 

Nope, it won't confirm what you say...    why?

 

Because now that iOS users have turn-by-turn navigation, Google is forced to compete by adding it in themselves (something they might not have done without Apple giving users the solution build-in.)

 

You might be right, but having Google offer it in the future is not an clear indication that you are right.

post #69 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sure my vehicles all have turn by turn voice but they also have visual cues on screen as well, just like the iOS app. The problem is unless you put the iOS device in the back seat you are going to be tempted to look at the screen. If the screen is not at the eye level position, it is dangerous, because you take your eyes too far from the road, for too long, and too often. The Apple app even gives you a big warning before you start using it.

 

I have an iPhone mount that sticks to my front windshield, it positions my iPhone right above the dashboard.  Doesn't everyone?

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post #70 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

That's not even close to what it said. It said that Apple was not offering terms that Google would agree to. So why is it Apple's fault?
And I'm still waiting for you to show exactly what Apple offered and what Google offered. You're so convinced that the problems are Apple's fault that you must know those things, right?
Again, you don't have any idea what was offered by either party, so please stop pretending that you know who is 'at fault' here.
As for Google screwing its iOS users, that's obvious. The iOS app has been missing features for years.

Where do I state someone's to blame? I believe they're both to blame. The agreement was up and both wanted more from the other, Apple wanted turn by turn and Google wanted in app branding plus Latitude. Neither wanted to give in so a deal wasn't reached which ended up screwing iOS users. I don't believe there was any malicious intent on either side.
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post #71 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Aside from one little problem - that's illegal in many (if not most) jurisdictions. Blocking portions of the windshield (aside from a few inches around the edges) is a no-no. Not to mention incredibly unsafe.

 

Mine is in the same place my old Magellan GPS unit used to be.  Close to eye level without blocking my view of the road.  Are you saying all GPS devices are illegal?

 

For the record, what's unsafe is having to manually cycle through the directions by pressing a spot on the screen after each turn.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Because, as stated in the article, Apple did not offer terms of their own, they just passive-aggressively refused everything Google suggested. Essentially, Apple wanted the feature without giving anything in return.

 

Google asked for unreasonable terms (for those that aren't aware, Latitude is Google's giant 24/7 mobile location tracking database) thinking they had Apple over the barrel.  It takes a lot of hubris on Google's part to assume Apple had no other options.

 

And good on Apple for standing up for iPhone user privacy.

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post #72 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Google asked for unreasonable terms (for those that aren't aware, Latitude is Google's giant 24/7 mobile location tracking database) thinking they had Apple over the barrel.  It takes a lot of hubris on Google's part to assume Apple had no other options.

Except that was one of several suggestions, not exactly a demand. Apple, in the other hand, didn't make any suggestions of their own, they just denied everything Google suggested, in essence only accepting it if Google provided the service for free. That's not standing for your users' privacy or experience or anything at all, that's a purely political decision not made with users in mind. Google also suggested adding in-app branding. which apple refused, and strangely you didn't mention it. Why did you forget?
post #73 of 89

I think that this is the main reason that Steve Jobs was so upset with Google. 
 

post #74 of 89
Originally Posted by rsdofny View Post
I think that this is the main reason that Steve Jobs was so upset with Google. 

 

I'd say "theft of an entire operating system, mirroring the illegal, immoral, and disgustingly pathetic actions of another man at another company just 20 years prior" would have superseded that. Not to say that he wouldn't have been upset about this, of course.

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post #75 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSheldon View Post


Fine, them keep paying as is until you get it right. iPhone users don't care about the voice we care about street view. Siri can't hear us on a street anyway to give us directions at least not in Manhattan.

i'm an iPhone user and is not at all dependent on the Street View, never used except for fun, and would rather be better off with voice direction.. so there.. not all iPhone users care about street view...

post #76 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSheldon View Post

Fine, them keep paying as is until you get it right. iPhone users don't care about the voice we care about street view. Siri can't hear us on a street anyway to give us directions at least not in Manhattan.

I just don't get this fascination people have with street view. It is a nice novelty but it isn't like there is this tremendous street view coverage that makes it predictable and a reliable tool. Does it show promiss? Certainly, but it's coverage is so thin that the bemoaning its loss is laughable.
post #77 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

That is what Apple did.  They took years to develop the app now featured in iOS 6.  So after years of development, you got an app that has less features than the one it replaced.  Apple used their cash to acquire a variety of map service companies.  Their app didn't take a day to develop, although it functions like an app that only took a day.

 

 

That is a little harsh don't you think?  It may be currently missing some features that some people use at times, but hardly a junk app.  If the maps app is that much of a deal breaker, then you should return your iPhone for an Android phone, and you can continue to use what you have always used plus get turn-by-turn directions.  However, there would undoubtedly be some features on that phone that you would have issues with as well, so you would have to weigh the pros and cons.  Apple cares more about their customers than almost any company out there and they decided that long-term, remaining with Google Maps is not in the best interest of their customers.  Sometimes you have to force people to use something new to see the long-term advantages, as people usually continue to use what they are used to and may not be aware or willing to try something new.  Otherwise, why are so many people still using Windows XP and Windows Vista (aside from the few whose hardware won't run Windows 7)?  There are growing pains to be sure, but it is like that for any big change.  Long-time Apple users have experienced these type of "all in" changes before, and it always worked out in the long run.  A lot of people who do use the maps app have no problems.  Unfortunately you are not one of them, but it's the same with any product.  The people with complaints always scream the loudest while the ones that are happy with it don't feel the need to be vocal.  Give it some time and try Apple's maps out for a while, and even help improve it if you can.  if you do not like it there are alternatives, some free, some not, but they do exist.  You may try them out and even find that you prefer one of them to what Google offered, you never know.  Sure that app may be one that costs money, but if it fits your needs better, it would be worth it if the app is that critical to you.   I believe there are valid issues that need to be addressed and perhaps would not have been if they were not brought to Apple's attention, but be constructive, speak your peace and move on.

post #78 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Turn by turn on an iOS device is not that useful. Unless you have dedicated mounting brackets in your auto so that the device is more at eye level, using turn by turn and looking down at the device sitting on the passenger seat or holding your phone while driving is a dangerous habit to get into. Personally, I have built in navigation in all my autos so I don't need it at all. I can see a case for all vehicles having built in navigation within the next 5 years or so. Perhaps this new Apple Maps service is the precursor to striking a deal with auto makers to provide built in iOS devices in the cars..
I used it over the weekend, in addition to the visual display it speaks the directions to you. It is usable without looking at the screen.

Do you really need an IOS device in every car? All you really need is an Airplay compatible display and a button on the steering wheel to activate Siri. This seems easier because I hate having to learn a new nav system every time I get into a different car. Wouldn't it be better to take your preferred nav solution - whether it be Apple Maps or another app - and use it effortlessly in whatever car you got into?

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

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We've always been at war with Eastasia...

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post #79 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Except that was one of several suggestions, not exactly a demand. Apple, in the other hand, didn't make any suggestions of their own, they just denied everything Google suggested, in essence only accepting it if Google provided the service for free. That's not standing for your users' privacy or experience or anything at all, that's a purely political decision not made with users in mind. Google also suggested adding in-app branding. which apple refused, and strangely you didn't mention it. Why did you forget?

That's not going to become true no matter how many times you say it.

Even if the rumor is correct (which isn't by any means certain), it only says that Apple didn't offer any terms that Google would agree to. There's absolutely nothing that says that Apple didn't offer anything at all.

BTW, I"m still waiting for you to provide the details of what Apple offered and what Google offered because you keep insisting that you know.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #80 of 89
Quote:
The iOS app was made by Apple, using Google's back-end data. Any inadequacies in the app would fall on Apple's shoulders...

My understanding was that apple couldn't LEGALLY add turn by turn due to their license with google. As for vector maps, they can't just Steal them form google, if google only provides raster maps.
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