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Google's "iLost" Motorola ad faked an address to "lose" iOS 6 Maps - Page 4

post #121 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

If every other map app shows the location where such an address would be and the NYC building authority or whatever lists it as a potential address...and it is displayed in an ad...how exactly is that underhanded and deceptive?

Because if you type in exactly what they said ("315 E 15th in Manhattan"), it takes you to the "right" place.
Quote:
Originally Posted by twosee View Post


Because it's using a non existent address giving off a false perception that the Apple maps is inferior, when in reality, using that same example, it's the MOTO device with Google Maps that is inferior. It's sending you to a non existent address.

Imagine you fat finger an address, or someone mistakenly gives you a wrong address (or you simply wrote it down wrong). lets say you are going to 1315 e 15th, or 315 e 115th... wouldn't you want your mapping software to correct you BEFORE you venture off so you can confirm the address, or just set you off driving to find yourself in front of a park?

That's a good point, as well. So Apple's Maps is the only one that's correct. Everyone else is sending you to a non-existent address (and Google is actually bragging about sending you on a wild goose chase. Go figure). (which is why I put 'right' in quotes).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHecta View Post

The funny part is that if you actually LOOK at the ad it says "315 e 15th st ny"  

Not "315 E 15th in Manhattan"

if we're gonna be technical.

Read the article that started this thread. Now, look at the third paragraph. Here, I'll quote it for you:
Quote:
"Looking for 315 E 15th in Manhattan?" Motorola Mobility posed on its Google+ site. "Google Maps on DROID RAZR M will get you there & not #iLost in Brooklyn."

If you type in exactly what they said (315 E 15th in Manhattan) it takes you to the "right" address.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

What evidence?  How about the blank cities around the world?  How about the POI database that's only a fraction of the size of Google's?  With regards to the amount of data Google stores for maps I can't find a number more recent than early 2006, but at that time they had 70 TB of data.  I can only imagine that it has ballooned to petabytes by now.  Nothing you say will make me believe that any of the companies whose data Apple is borrowing have such a vast database.

Sorry, but none of that is evidence. Google Maps has mistakes, too. So where is the evidence that Apple Maps has more?
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

You really think that Google paid someone for months just to look through a database to find missing entries?  First of all, that takes minutes if not seconds as long you're leveraging the power of the computer that stores the database instead of doing it manually.  Second, no company in their right mind would do that simply to make an internet-based ad.

You're right. No company in their right mind would do that simply to make an ad. But Google apparently did. How else do you think they came up with that address?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Close to what? Is Manhattan closer to NY than Brooklyn is? The point is that there's more than one "E 15th St" in "NY" 

Another excellent point.
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post #122 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

And I guarantee if you send a letter to the Stuyvesant Square's address as given by Apple's Map app, it will be returned to you as undeliverable as well. The USPS is in the business of delivering mail, not collecting property taxes. I owned several lots joined together, each with its own address as far as the city was concerned, however, there was a single house on the lot with only one address the USPS acknowledged (I know because I rented out a guest house and tried to use the corresponding property address).

 

The USPS is the final arbiter of addresses in the US of A, as you seem to have discovered.

 

Property taxes use one of the various survey systems to exactly (or in many cases, not so exactly) identify and define land boundaries instead of mailing addresses.  But I suspect you knew that...

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post #123 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 


I've moved on from this MapCrapGate pissing contest... There are more important issues that need to be addressed:


 


I've decided to offer special training for the new iPhone 5 EarPods -- the proper methods and procedures of reinstalling the EarPods into their specially molded holder and case.


[image]

Based on anecdotal experience and observation, there is a compelling need for this training...




I anticipate that it will be well received -- possibly equalling the enormously popular "Bidet For Dummies".

But it looks nice all wrapped up. I just through that casing out as I never again will attempt to use it. There might be a useful solution but that's not it.

As an aside, this is the first time Apple has shipped the plastic casing you get with headphones (at least with their in-ear phones) with the iPhone. It does look nicer but it's also extra waste in the packaging so if Apple did away with it for the 7th gen iPhone I'd prefer that.

I'd also like them to finally get rid of the wall charger because they are interchangeable and many other vendors are now using the USB-A EPS concept Apple has used for over 8 years now so I think people typically have plenty of these. It's not costly, but it does add waste, which is what the EU mandate was suppose to be reducing with their interchangeable EPS usage.


PS: I think this is the first iPhone that had extra printed material describing the features. I wonder if it's because some of them, like Passbook, are still a bit unusual for many to grasp.

 

As to the power supply... I think Apple' EPS is better:

 

 

 

 

Quote:

What makes Apple's iPhone charger special

Apple's power adapter is clearly a high-quality power supply designed to produce carefully filtered power. Apple has obviously gone to extra effort to reduce EMI interference, probably to keep the charger from interfering with the touchscreen.[16] When I opened the charger up, I expected to find a standard design, but I've compared the charger to the Samsung charger and several other high-quality industry designs,[17] and Apple goes beyond these designs in several ways.

The input AC is filtered thorugh a tiny ferrite ring on the plastic case (see photo below). The diode bridge output is filtered by two large capacitors and an inductor. Two other R-C snubbers filter the diode bridge, which I've only seen elsewhere in audio power supplies to prevent 60Hz hum;[6] perhaps this enhances the iTunes listening experience. Other chargers I disassembled don't use a ferrite ring and usually only a single filter capacitor. The primary circuit board has a grounded metal shield over the high-frequency components (see photo), which I haven't seen elsewhere. The transformer includes a shield winding to absorb EMI. The output circuit uses three capacitors including two relatively expensive tantalum ones[14] and an inductor for filtering, when many supplies just use one capacitor. The Y capacitor is usually omitted from other designs. The resonant clamp circuit is highly innovative.[9]

Apple's design provides extra safety in a few ways that were discussed earlier: the super-strong AC prongs, and the complex over-temperature / over-voltage shutdown circuit. Apple's isolation distance between primary and secondary appears to go beyond the regulations.

 

 

Conclusions

Apple's iPhone charger crams a lot of technology into a small space. Apple went to extra effort to provide higher quality and safety than other name-brand chargers, but this quality comes at a high cost.

If you're interested in power supplies, please take a look at my other articles: tiny, cheap, dangerous: Inside a (fake) iPhone charger, where I disassemble a $2.79 iPhone charger and discover that it violates many safety rules; don't buy one of these. Also take a look at Apple didn't revolutionize power supplies; new transistors did which examines the history of switching power supplies. To see Apple's adapter disassembled, check out videos created byscourtheearth and Ladyada. Finally, if you have an interesting charger lying around that you don't want, send it to me and maybe I'll write up a detailed teardown of it.

 

 

http://www.arcfn.com/2012/05/apple-iphone-charger-teardown-quality.html

 

 

This attention to detail has always been an Apple characteristic... going back to Rod Holt's switching power supply in the Apple ][ -- it allowed the Apple ][ to [just barely] get by without needing a fan.

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post #124 of 268

Just mailed this paper to David Pogue's NYTimes. He instantly reacted. Hopefully this will get known.

post #125 of 268
Apple should exercise extreme caution in implementing the hundreds of thousands of crowdsourced corrections that must be streaming in from iOS 6 Maps users currently.

As cartographers, it is expected that their Maps team should however be scrutinising every incoming request for amendments using at least 2 or 3 other mapping sources, and here's why:

It concerns the "Mocality Affair" that occurred very early this year in Kenya, East Africa and is quite a humdinger:

http://technoose.com/strike-two-for-google-with-openstreetmap-vandalism-claim/

http://opengeodata.org/google-ip-vandalizing-openstreetmap
Edited by airmanchairman - 9/27/12 at 4:06pm
post #126 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

The USPS is the final arbiter of addresses in the US of A, as you seem to have discovered.

Property taxes use one of the various survey systems to exactly (or in many cases, not so exactly) identify and define land boundaries instead of mailing addresses.  But I suspect you knew that...
Right, deliverable addresses.

So as far as Stuyvesant Square is concerned, the NYC park service doesn't even assign it an address, so why would Apple Maps? Google Maps doesn't assign it an address either.

As much as we're faulting Google for using an address which perfectly well describes a meeting point at one corner of Stuyvesant Square, which the NYC parks dept defines as a range of addresses and boundaries, Apple is just as much at fault for creating a fictitious address for the park which appears nowhere, including government documents and the USPS. If the shoe were on the other foot, and Apple was saying Google Maps could not find 297 2nd Ave NY (which it can), Apple would be just as wrong as Google since they reflect this as Stuyvesant square, even though no official source, including the USPS recognizes it as a real address. Meanwhile Google does not make the mistake of stating this is the address of Stuyvesant Square.

All I'm saying is, you can't have it both ways. I totally agree that Google screwed up here when they could have easily used a number of flawed examples (I went searching for the nearest local Walmart and Apple Maps put one in a single family home in the middle of a residential neighborhood) instead of this seemingly random fabrication. But these addresses are either valid or they're not. As I have indicated, I use such addresses to my advantage, especially when meeting someone in an otherwise unsubdivided large space. But to say the address is not a valid indication of location merely because the USPS doesn't recognize it as deliverable doesn't fly in my book. I recall numerous stories where properties were subdivided and a new address created, but it took months for the USPS to recognize it as a deliverable address, even though the city legally created and sanctioned it.The same is often true for new addresses built in rural locations. So frankly, I would prefer to have the city property detail to assist with such new addresses, since we all know by these discussions how long it takes these map apps to update information.
Edited by Mac_128 - 9/27/12 at 4:03pm
post #127 of 268
Just another lie from google. What else would you expect from the company that got caught circumventing safari security and ie security settings by coding around it then denying that they did anything wrong by violating millions of end users privacy. Every time google gets caught they use the "oh sorry we didn't really mean to do that".

Problem is they have done that so many times now there getting fined left and right by governments around the world. And sued by companies and organizations around the world. There being investigated by the european commission for monopolistic practices and the DOJ here at home for the same thing.

I hope they get slammed and reamed for every bit of lying they do, they deserve it and have no one to blame for there behavior but themselves.
post #128 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

PS: I think this is the first iPhone that had extra printed material describing the features. I wonder if it's because some of them, like Passbook, are still a bit unusual for many to grasp.

 

I like to keep all my packaging intact so the folder with the printed material makes a nice place to store the plastic screen protector sheets.

 

As an off topic side note I would like to mention to those upgrading that the AT&T unlock policy has changed slightly. In the beginning they would unlock the out of contract phones at the AT&T store. Then they started using the support line 611. Now apparently you have to use the website: http://att.com/deviceunlock. After filling out the information requested they will respond in 5-7 business days to give you instructions on how to use iTunes to unlock your phone. So I am waiting...

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post #129 of 268

"Apple did it with all their own hardware and software"

 

You do know that Samsung manufacturers a lot of the hardware in the iPhone right? Apple doesn't make its own hardware anymore because it was shit. 

post #130 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by omgdracula View Post

"Apple did it with all their own hardware and software"

 

You do know that Samsung manufacturers a lot of the hardware in the iPhone right? Apple doesn't make its own hardware anymore because it was shit. 

You fail to understand the ecosystem. When I want a cheeseburger, I don't go raise a calf to a cow, kill it, butcher it, age it, and grind it. No, I buy it all ready to cook so I can spend my time designing the tastiest burger ever with the pickles which I don't grow and cheese which I don't culture and salt I don't mine. Apple designs the specifications for the phone and the menial laborers produce the required components required to assemble the final product.

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post #131 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I like to keep all my packaging intact so the folder with the printed material makes a nice place to store the plastic screen protector sheets.

As an off topic side note I would like to mention to those upgrading that the AT&T unlock policy has changed slightly. In the beginning they would unlock the out of contract phones at the AT&T store. Then they started using the support line 611. Now apparently you have to use the website: http://att.com/deviceunlock. After filling out the information requested they will respond in 5-7 business days to give you instructions on how to use iTunes to unlock your phone. So I am waiting...

1) I keep all the packing materials, too, save for the plastic wrap over the box, but I never thought to put the plastic screen protectors in the documentation sleeve.

2) Thanks! I restored my iPhone 4 last night expecting the unlock to appear. I was just going to go to an AT&T store at some point to get it resolved. I had it on my list of errands for the weekend. You just saved me some time.

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post #132 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

A lot of posts that don't toe the "Apple is GOD" line are deleted...
pathetic.

The mere fact that you have, and continue to, post utterly disproves this point.

However, you did take us to a nice fantasy-land for a moment, didn't you? ;-)
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post #133 of 268
Apple won't sue because they would lose in court. Everyone, including Apple, knows that the premature release of Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.

Despite having a year left in their contract with Google, Apple decided to replace Google Maps with its own inferior solution, which is missing many useful features such as bike paths, public transportation route, street view, etc. Not to mention all of the problems they have with things like the Statue of Liberty being flattened. Since Apple usually ADDS features instead of REMOVING them, one can only come to the conclusion that iOS6 was more about APPLE and not its USERS. You know the situation is dire when Steven Colbert makes fun of the iPhone as he loves Apple products and is always promoting them on his show.

Maps, needs a Beta tag. Perhaps even an Alpha tag.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


I hope Apple sues them into oblivion.
Equally important, I hope that all the media that has been spewing this fact-free story will retract it and publicize Google's fraud. Of course, that's probably too much to ask.
In spite of all the noise, there's not one shred of evidence that Apple's Maps is significantly worse than the other options out there. They all have failures.
post #134 of 268

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 1/21/13 at 3:07pm
post #135 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

So since when did Apple Insider practice censorship?
A lot of posts that don't toe the "Apple is GOD" line are deleted...
pathetic.

 

If it were up to me, I'd instantly ban about 10-15% of all users here, maybe even more. This is not a democracy, and frankly, I'm not interested in what any Fandroids have to say. I come here to speak with fellow Apple users and anybody who doesn't fall into that category has no business being here, IMO. I've also mentioned this in the past, but if it were up to me (which it is not of course), I would only allow OS 9, OS X and iOS devices to be able to access an Apple centric site.

 

Apple users do not care about Fandroids, and they are unwanted. They are as welcome as a bunch of lepers.

post #136 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Apple won't sue because they would lose in court. Everyone, including Apple, knows that the premature release of Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.

Despite having a year left in their contract with Google, Apple decided to replace Google Maps with its own inferior solution, which is missing many useful features such as bike paths, public transportation route, street view, etc. Not to mention all of the problems they have with things like the Statue of Liberty being flattened. Since Apple usually ADDS features instead of REMOVING them, one can only come to the conclusion that iOS6 was more about APPLE and not its USERS. You know the situation is dire when Steven Colbert makes fun of the iPhone as he loves Apple products and is always promoting them on his show.

Maps, needs a Beta tag. Perhaps even an Alpha tag.

 

iOS 6 is free to users of qualified devices with some limitations depending on which hardware your are using. Apple doesn't profit much from offering continual OS upgrades to older hardware. It is a perk you get with iOS which differentiates it from Android where OS upgrades are hard to come by. For the adopters of iPhone 5, I don't think very many people are dwelling on the differences between Google Maps and Apple maps because there is so much to enjoy about the new device that everyone is just marveling in how light the device is and fast everything is. The difference in Maps has its pros and cons but the new phone is amazing and that is where Apple makes its money - selling new phones.

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post #137 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by popnfresh View Post
Google Maps wouldn't have been fooled by the same trick because their map database is several orders of magnitude more detailed than Apple's is. Google was simply driving that point home.


Google was simply driving what point home?
That they can find imaginary addresses?

post #138 of 268
Apple would almost certainly correct a legitimate address used in a Google attack within a few hours. An address that is out-of-date or where Google mangles an address in some way that is arguably wrong would more likely remain as a difference between Google and Apple.

So far, I haven't found anything wrong in iOS6 Maps, but I have found it to be a bit more finicky than Google Maps in iOS5.
post #139 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.

Releasing the original iPhone was a mistake?

I wish a lot more companies, across a wider range of industries, would make a lot more mistakes more often then...
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post #140 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post


Releasing the original iPhone was a mistake?

 

I bet that Nokia, RIM and every other phone manufacturer on the planet wishes that Apple hadn't made that revolutionary, mind-blowing device that completely changed the entire industry mistake.

post #141 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by c4rlob View Post

This is an example of how easily people accept Google results as law. Over the years I have found Google's Maps for iOS to be highly flawed (in NYC) for a mapping service that has been around so long. So most of the fervent criticism of Apple Maps struck me as spoiled rhetoric %u2013 which will always be Apple's problem because they consistently raise the bar so high that people expect perfection from them.
I don't want to diminish the real mistakes in Apple Maps, but I just can't empathize since I have yet to find any trouble with the new Maps. I updated my iPhone 3GS - yes, 3GS %u2013 right before going on a weekend trip to upstate NY to a not-so populated town not even thinking that I might be jeopardizing my access to reliable mapping. Yet the maps worked perfectly. It helped my wife and I with our newborn baby find our way around flawlessly, a couple times even better than Google Maps probably would have with its missing image grids trying to keep up with low signal spots.

 

That's the crux of the issue I think.  Some people have issues, it's true.  But to make it seem that millions of iOS6 users are simply stuck where they're standing because the map app is worthless is going overboard.

post #142 of 268

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Edited by MacRulez - 1/21/13 at 3:06pm
post #143 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by simtub View Post

Losing Google's YouTube App on iOS:
No biggie...we don't have to watch Gangnam Style

Losing Google Maps on iOS:
Millions of users in the Apple community disoriented...Apple, this is a monumental and fundamental part of what makes the iPhone or any smartphone a fledging Internet communications device. We have become so dependant on this in our daily lives and we take google maps as a feature that we pay for on iPhone having paid 1000's of dollars on products.

When the first iPhone came out, google maps was a primary feature and since then it always has been for millions of us. Now... Suddenly this smartphone is not so smart after all is it?

All we as customers want is some official statement regarding the situation so we can make calculated decisions in our own lives. The majority of users don't care about your beef with Google... We just want to know what's going to be done about this fiasco of epic proportions.

 

Really?  Do you need the maps app that much?  Are you that lost constantly?  I mean, unless you are constantly on business trips in different locations around the world does it really disorient your daily life that much?  I can see you being a little perturbed if you get an inaccuracy here or there, but if that is the app you use the most out of all the apps you have purchased or used, and is the most crucial, then perhaps you should go the Android route or try one of the many navigation apps on the AppStore.  I keep reading about how Apple users buy apps and that Android users are cheap and only want free stuff, so the fact that another map app costs money should not be a problem if one of those are more usable than the current app.  Just pointing out that there are alternatives.  Apple will continue to improve their navigation at an accelerated rate, but if it does not work for you, there are other choices.

post #144 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichFromNY View Post

I love reading the Apple boards and Android boards for a good laugh...with the way some of you people react you would thing someone from the other side just walked in a kicked your puppy...

 

Sad but true.

post #145 of 268
to all you Google apologists, Google's use of an address in its attack ad with no real world door in fact is disingenuous BS - and you know it. cut the crap.

an honest person or company would have made sure it was real, period, no exceptions and no excuses.

sure, interpolating locations based on block numbering is helpful when you don't have the precise address. but to use that to set up a "gotcha" for across the board trashing of your competition, inferring it can't find real addresses too, is worse than cheap tricks. it's a lie.

did they know? of course they did. Google IS evil. cut the crap.
post #146 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Apple won't sue because they would lose in court. Everyone, including Apple, knows that the premature release of Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.

This should be interesting....

In what sense was the original iPhone a mistake? It basically revolutionized an industry and started Apple's multibillion mobile business. So please enlighten us on why it was a huge mistake.
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post #147 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Apple won't sue because they would lose in court. Everyone, including Apple, knows that the premature release of Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.

This should be interesting....

In what sense was the original iPhone a mistake? It basically revolutionized an industry and started Apple's multibillion mobile business. So please enlighten us on why it was a huge mistake.

Not to support his allegations but when I read that, I also thought it made no sense, so I think he meant something like: Since the time of the first introduction of the iPhone they have made very few mistakes, but in his opinion the Maps is the big one. Not that I agree....

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post #148 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Apple won't sue because they would lose in court. Everyone, including Apple, knows that the premature release of Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.

Despite having a year left in their contract with Google, Apple decided to replace Google Maps with its own inferior solution, which is missing many useful features such as bike paths, public transportation route, street view, etc. Not to mention all of the problems they have with things like the Statue of Liberty being flattened. Since Apple usually ADDS features instead of REMOVING them, one can only come to the conclusion that iOS6 was more about APPLE and not its USERS. You know the situation is dire when Steven Colbert makes fun of the iPhone as he loves Apple products and is always promoting them on his show.

Maps, needs a Beta tag. Perhaps even an Alpha tag.

 

 

I have no need for bike path locations, public transportation routes or street views, thus they are not useful features to me.  If I need to catch the bus, strangely enough I know where bus stops are (they don't change that often and neither do subway stations), and I, like many others, also know what the Statue of Liberty looks like so the sky is not falling.  If such features are useful to you then say so, but do not think everyone has the same issues.  Apple HAS added features for you.  Face it, Google's iOS maps app would never have changed, why should it?  They had no reason to improve it, it was a free service on iOS, so who would complain?  Meanwhile,  Apple has removed ads, added turn-by-turn directions, protected your privacy and has ensured that iOS users will be treated like first class citizens now and in the future.  Some growing pains, sure, for some people.  Others have experienced no issues at all.  It is not the end of the world (we still have a few months until that happens).  As I have mentioned in some other posts, there are alternatives if you are not satisfied.

post #149 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSteelers View Post

 Meanwhile,  Apple has removed ads, ....

Were there ads in Google Maps for iOS? I did not see them.

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post #150 of 268

>> address that didn't actually exist <<

 

If IOS 6 Map looks for it then it's a terrible software bug that needs to get fixed. It must prompt "address does not exist" then stops instead of pointing the user into a totally irrelevant location. IOS 6 Map developers should try a bad address on a $50 GPS to learn how it works.

post #151 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waverunnr View Post

Apple won't sue because they would lose in court. Everyone, including Apple, knows that the premature release of Maps is the biggest mistake Apple has made since the release of the original iPhone.


Yeah... And we all know how THAT mistake turned out. I wish more companies would take more risks like that.
post #152 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddE View Post

>> address that didn't actually exist <<


If IOS 6 Map looks for it then it's a terrible software bug that needs to get fixed. It must prompt "address does not exist" then stops instead of pointing the user into a totally irrelevant location. IOS 6 Map developers should try a bad address on a $50 GPS to learn how it works.

Except for one thing. When it was given the address, it pointed the user to the nearest location (Brooklyn) that had that address. So why is that wrong?
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post #153 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

So since when did Apple Insider practice censorship?
A lot of posts that don't toe the "Apple is GOD" line are deleted...
pathetic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

The mere fact that you have, and continue to, post utterly disproves this point.
However, you did take us to a nice fantasy-land for a moment, didn't you? ;-)

I've had 2 posts today deleted because I didn't tow the line.
post #154 of 268
If Apple didn't make a shit app to begin with our iPhones would be working better. Sue them for what pointing out the fact that their Maps App if a failure and that we a touted feature (one again) does not meet the promise or the expectation.

Get real, I checked Google Maps online and the address came up, seems like a bunch of BS to me. Oh and yes I have owned the iP4, iP4s and I have the iP5 64GB Black on Verizon!
post #155 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

Lol!
Apple just sold over 5 million iPhone 5 s in the past week and a half so this crap by Moto is mute IMHO. And Apple did it with their own hardware and software.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristophB View Post


moot?

In his defense crap can't speak  :)

post #156 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

so if I'm understanding you all correctly...everyone else is wrong...Apple is right?
I guess it's possible...though unlikely.

 

Not unlikely at all, in fact, that's usually the case, why should this time be different? You know, it's just like the time that they were right about a touch screen device being better than a Blackberry, and everyone else, including Google, was wrong.

post #157 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

... You really think that Google paid someone for months just to look through a database to find missing entries?  First of all, that takes minutes if not seconds as long you're leveraging the power of the computer that stores the database instead of doing it manually.  Second, no company in their right mind would do that simply to make an internet-based ad.

 

Yes, absolutely.

 

They had no choice but to do it manually, because they don't have the ability to, "[leverage] the power of the computer that stores the database." They don't have access directly to Apple's servers, so, yes, absolutely, they paid people to do it.

 

They didn't do it just for the ad, they did it for this entire astroturfing, media shepherding, PR campaign they have launched against Apple's Maps. But, it's clear they had to dig pretty deep for some pretty arcane results. Getting shut out from iPhone users will put a big hit on their revenues, they have no scruples, so, yes, absolutely.

post #158 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichFromNY View Post

I love reading the Apple boards and Android boards for a good laugh...with the way some of you people react you would thing someone from the other side just walked in a kicked your puppy...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iSteelers View Post

 

Sad but true.

Amazing, you guys finally understand.

 

It is sad and true that you'll never know what it's like to really enjoy a computer/mobile device unless you own an Apple product. 

 

I commend you for your honesty and maturity.

post #159 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by EddE View Post

>> address that didn't actually exist <<


If IOS 6 Map looks for it then it's a terrible software bug that needs to get fixed. It must prompt "address does not exist" then stops instead of pointing the user into a totally irrelevant location. IOS 6 Map developers should try a bad address on a $50 GPS to learn how it works.

Except for one thing. When it was given the address, it pointed the user to the nearest location (Brooklyn) that had that address. So why is that wrong?

 

Wrong or not, Apple appear to have updated their database so that it now returns the same Manhattan address whether or not "Manhattan" is included in the search.

post #160 of 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Except for one thing. When it was given the address, it pointed the user to the nearest location (Brooklyn) that had that address. So why is that wrong?

 

It's wrong because the given address was totally irrelevant. It's like you wanted to find a ghost and IOS 6 showed some living person's face.

There should be no substitution for anything that did not exist. Now if IOS 6 Map searched in a table that contained correct address, I think Apple would need to pay Google to use their search algorithm, simply the best.

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