or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple says purple fringing is normal for iPhone 5 camera
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple says purple fringing is normal for iPhone 5 camera - Page 2

post #41 of 93

Freaking whiners and trolls are really infesting this thread as usual.

My 2-1/2 year old iPhone has this problem, my BRAND NEW Canon S100 powershot camera I use for underwater photography exhibits a similar problem, an older Canon camera had the same problem, my professional photographer buddy with his $7K Nikon camera gets lens flare as well.

But NO... Apple gets this problem so they should be held with its feet to the fire!!

You guys are a bunch of iHating a$$hats simply hating for the sake of hating.  Buzz off to an Android site and spew your nonsense there.

post #42 of 93
Apple seems to be taking its cues from Micrsoft. There are no problems; they are features.

Anyone taking bets that Apple's stock will drop into the low 500s before the end of the year?
post #43 of 93

It is NOT chroma abberation. CA shows strong purple fringes.

 

That's a len flare with purple haze. It's nothing you can do about it. Really.

 

dpreview.com did review on it and said the same thing:

 

"The most likely cause of the iPhone 5's purple haze is probably lens flare and internal reflections in the camera lens assembly. All lenses are succeptable to lens flare to some degree, and as you can see from the images at the top of this page, the iPhone 4S isn't immune either (ditto the iPhone 4 and competitive smartphones from other manufacturers)." 

 

"Really, our advice is not to worry. Just do what you should do anyway, and avoid putting bright lights near the edge of the frame when shooting."

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/6867454450/quick-review-apple-iphone-5-camera/3

 

End of discussion. 

post #44 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by netrox View Post

It is NOT chroma abberation. CA shows strong purple fringes.

 

That's a len flare with purple haze. It's nothing you can do about it. Really.

 

dpreview.com did review on it and said the same thing:

 

"The most likely cause of the iPhone 5's purple haze is probably lens flare and internal reflections in the camera lens assembly. All lenses are succeptable to lens flare to some degree, and as you can see from the images at the top of this page, the iPhone 4S isn't immune either (ditto the iPhone 4 and competitive smartphones from other manufacturers)." 

 

"Really, our advice is not to worry. Just do what you should do anyway, and avoid putting bright lights near the edge of the frame when shooting."

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/6867454450/quick-review-apple-iphone-5-camera/3

 

End of discussion. 


The flaw in your logic is that you're using logic.  This will not appease the iHating fandroid a$$hats that are spewing their Apple-hatred everywhere.  Who cares that every camera (phone and dedicated) out there suffers from lens flare in their own way.  All that matters is that Apple has the problem and nothing more.

Jeez, I wish mods on all the forums would clamp down on the trolls.  It just really makes me think that the owners of these sites allow it to go on simply for the page hits.  It really becomes a drag to sift through 99% trash to find anything meaningful.

I have a passion for underwater photography, and guess what??? When I take photos underwater and point the camera up when the sun is up there, I get the exact same thing with a dedicated camera rig!!!

Fricken sh!theads.  I'd tolerate it if it had even a shred of truth to it, but the reality is they are just hating for the sake of hating.

post #45 of 93
post #46 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

Everyone with an iPhone5 I know have this problem. 


Purple haze on ordinary pictures. Something that does not appear on other cameras/phones including the iPhone4S. 

Many of the Apple fans/users I know are returning their iphones. Something I have not seen in over 12 years following Apple products. This is huge. 

Antenna gate (that was really a non issue, since it was a USA/AT&T problem) can't compare to this. Lens covers solves the problem. Maybe Apple will release free lens covers? 

Otherwise: this is a flawed design. Steve would fire Tim on the spot. 

You troll as badly as you handle the English language.
post #47 of 93
Flare is a problem that can affect lenses costing many hundreds of pounds/dollars to one degree or another. Maybe Apple should consider a coating on their new lens but actually people could learn some photography basics and the problem would be minimised. Or some manufacturer can work out a way of attaching a tiny lens hood... but that's my idea and I expect Apple and Samsung to get in the queue to buy it.
post #48 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

Steve would fire Tim on the spot. 

post #49 of 93

BREAKING NEWS

CAMERA SUFFERS FROM LENS FLARE

EVERYONE PANIC

 

ANDROID USERS R**E EACH OTHER IN THANKS FOR A WEAK EXCUSE TO COMPLAIN ABOUT APPLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

... at night.

Reply

... at night.

Reply
post #50 of 93

 

Interesting.

 

 

 

I'm not a photography expert (which I'm sure you are), but when doing a test like this, shouldn't the pictures be taken in the same position and at roughly the same time of day?

 

I only mention it because the crane in the background seems to be in a completely different position.

post #51 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

Interesting.




I'm not a photography expert (which I'm sure you are), but when doing a test like this, shouldn't the pictures be taken in the same position and at roughly the same time of day?

I only mention it because the crane in the background seems to be in a completely different position.

Well, yes. That would make sense. But the iHaters refuse to do anything that makes sense.

It's like Maps-gate. While there's a ton of whining about how bad Apple's Maps are, no one is willing to do a side-by-side comparison of Apple Maps vs Google Maps under the same conditions. They'd rather simply live in their fact-free Apple-hating world. (Consumer Reports was the sole exception and they found that there was no real difference between the two in terms of accuracy).
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #52 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

This is a camera design problem.

 

I don't have an iPhone 5 to play with, but I'd perhaps characterize this as a "design limitation". You want a high resolution camera in a device this thin, this is one of the limitations you are going to have to accept. It might/should be possible to improve it, either with lens design of software, but for a device this thin you are going to be bending light at pretty sharp angles to get it focused on the sensor, likely contributing to the purple shift (from the few photos I've looked at this goes beyond typical purple fringing).

 

Of course, Apple can't say this...it would make their drive toward thin look like a bad decision (pros and cons in all design decisions). It is was it is. Is it an issue Apple can perhaps improve on? Probably. Is it the end of the world? Certainly not.

 

Edit: Recall the issue a few years ago where it appeared Apple dropped the camera from the iPod touch at the last minute? The suspected reason was that the camera modules they had to fit in the super thin touch was not of good enough quality. The thinner you try to make a camera the more limitations you are going to have to try to address with the design of the camera. You are going to eventually get to the point where you perhaps can't design around the limitations and you'll just have to accept it.


Edited by Wiggin - 10/2/12 at 4:33am
post #53 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

 

Interesting.

 

 

 

I'm not a photography expert (which I'm sure you are), but when doing a test like this, shouldn't the pictures be taken in the same position and at roughly the same time of day?

 

I only mention it because the crane in the background seems to be in a completely different position.

 

If you would do some research you'd find lots of those picture comparisons. And if you don't trust them then maybe you should perform your own tests. Maybe you can provide some pictures to prove all smartphone cameras have the same issue.

post #54 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kermitos View Post

 

If you would do some research you'd find lots of those picture comparisons. And if you don't trust them then maybe you should perform your own tests. Maybe you can provide some pictures to prove all smartphone cameras have the same issue.

 

If you'd done some research and found a decent comparison before running here for your first troll, then you wouldn't have tripped on your first step and fallen flat on your face ... lol.gif

post #55 of 93
When I was taking photography classes in high school, some 35 years ago, lens flare such as that seen in this photo was called one of two things, a "special effect" or a "bad picture." Nobody ever mentioned "camera design flaw." /bs
/bs
Reply
/bs
Reply
post #56 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

 

If you'd done some research and found a decent comparison before running here for your first troll, then you wouldn't have tripped on your first step and fallen flat on your face ... lol.gif

 

Well you can believe whatever you want, it's not really my problem.

 

I've seen lots of comparisons and people complaining about the issue and saying it wasn't happening with their 4S.

Do you have anything to prove that it's just as radical with other phones aswell? Oh wait, you don't have to because I'm just trolling.

Sorry. Continue and enjoy taking pictures.

post #57 of 93

Wouldn't HDR mode help? has anyone tried taking the same shot again? 

 

and aside from action shots that you cannot ask to be repeated - it is so easy to take another picture right away if you are not happy with the results - its not like you take a picture and have to wait 24 hours to see the results. 

 

and perhaps there will be some sort of option such as red eye removal that can address this either on the fly or in Edit mode.

 
post #58 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kermitos View Post

 

Well you can believe whatever you want, it's not really my problem.

 

I've seen lots of comparisons and people complaining about the issue and saying it wasn't happening with their 4S.

Do you have anything to prove that it's just as radical with other phones aswell? Oh wait, you don't have to because I'm just trolling.

Sorry. Continue and enjoy taking pictures.

 

I will. Thanks. 

 

And please come again, it's been an absolute treat.

 

:-)

 

I wonder how many people have decided to jump in based on complaints they've "seen"?


Edited by Rayz - 10/2/12 at 5:25am
post #59 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

 

I will. Thanks. 

 

And please come again, it's been an absolute treat.

 

:-)

 

My pleasure. Just curious did you even look at all the pictures from the test that I pasted? You seemed to just stick to the first pictures.

post #60 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeowulfSchmidt View Post

When I was taking photography classes in high school, some 35 years ago, lens flare such as that seen in this photo was called one of two things, a "special effect" or a "bad picture." Nobody ever mentioned "camera design flaw." /bs

World we live in ... :-(

post #61 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

If it's not a common occurrence, great. I don't see it as a problem.

But what I see in the example image in the article is very unusual. I've never seen flaring like that from a headlight!

If it routinely occurs in that kind of a lighting situation, it's a glaring (no pun . . . ) camera design fault.

Do you even own an iPhone 5? Have you experienced this problem yourself? Why are you so devoted to this issue if:

1) It is not affecting you or,

2) You don't even use this phone

 

Just when I start feeling good about the Internet, I stumble back into these forums and read these threads.

The Americans can always be trusted to do the right thing, once all other possibilities have been exhausted.
Reply
The Americans can always be trusted to do the right thing, once all other possibilities have been exhausted.
Reply
post #62 of 93

This is basically how the iPhone compact camera handles what would otherwise cause "lens flare" in a full SLR camera… 

 

There are fewer lenses in the phone camera, and they are flatter and much closer together. What would show up as multiple rings (and if you look closely, multi-colored "flares") in a regular SLR lens, is reduced to a blurred violet color… but the cause and effect is no different.

 

Ironically, it's actually the sign of a HIGHER quality lens and camera element… cheaper, lower quality phone cameras don't 'suffer' this effect, you just get what I call "light smears"… a blurry overexposed patch of over-lit area.

 

And anyway, the "fringing", aka "blurred lens flare", is easily avoided. 

 

It's going to happen. It's the nature of the machine. Just like, if you hit a wall with a car, it will dent. If you point a camera at certain angles to intense light, it will "flare"… come on. The complaints are spurious and disingenuous...

post #63 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

If it's not a common occurrence, great. I don't see it as a problem.

But what I see in the example image in the article is very unusual. I've never seen flaring like that from a headlight!

If it routinely occurs in that kind of a lighting situation, it's a glaring (no pun . . . ) camera design fault.

 

well, not really… I can recreate a similar kind of effect using my Canon DSLR… so I guess what we're saying here is that ALL camera designs are faulty? And some people are apparently angry that Apple hasn't 're-invented' THAT part of the camera (never mind that this camera takes nicer photos than a digital SLR I had only 5 years ago…!).

post #64 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by kermitos View Post

 

My pleasure. Just curious did you even look at all the pictures from the test that I pasted? You seemed to just stick to the first pictures.

 

Why, yes, I did. Did you?

 

Every single picture was taken from a different position and/or with different lighting. 

 

May I suggest that you try the camera yourself, rather than just parroting stuff you've read on the interweb?

post #65 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcorban View Post

Do you even own an iPhone 5? Have you experienced this problem yourself? Why are you so devoted to this issue if:

1) It is not affecting you or,

2) You don't even use this phone

 

Just when I start feeling good about the Internet, I stumble back into these forums and read these threads.


1) My daughter does and it is effecting her.  What people are failing to grasp here is that on the 3, 3G, 4 and 4S this was not a common issue.  People using these phones just like to snap pictures with little to know thought going into composition.  Prior to the 5, it was a no brainer, now this is not the case and it is frustrating to them and her. 

post #66 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...Our engineering team just gave me this information and we recommend that you angle the camera away from the bright light source when taking pictures...

 

He is just holding it wrong. lol.gif

 

Sorry, had to be said! ;-)

post #67 of 93
I experimented a little with this on my iPhone5, and I found a couple ways to reduce or eliminate the purple flare:

1) Zoom in a bit (you can keep the bright object in the scene) the purple shows up at wider angle settings. You'll notice that in the iPhone4 vs iPhone5 comparison the iPhone4 is zoomed in more.

2) Set the exposure to the bright object by touching the screen near the bright object.

I doubt this is chromatic aberration... it seems more likely a combination of internal reflections and the particular sensor used.
post #68 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by irobot2004 View Post

I experimented a little with this on my iPhone5, and I found a couple ways to reduce or eliminate the purple flare:

1) Zoom in a bit (you can keep the bright object in the scene) the purple shows up at wider angle settings. You'll notice that in the iPhone4 vs iPhone5 comparison the iPhone4 is zoomed in more.

2) Set the exposure to the bright object by touching the screen near the bright object.

I doubt this is chromatic aberration... it seems more likely a combination of internal reflections and the particular sensor used.

 

The iPhone has a fixed focal length lens. Zooming is just cropping.

post #69 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Cue the outrage of people who think they *should* be able to take pictures of the sun, and how it's all a conspiracy, and that their Blackberry/Android device allowed them to take pictures of the sun, etc.

^this^

 

I've shot photos for decades: bright light sources cause flare (that purple) the color may be unique but the phenomena isn't at all. One reason on my slr's I routinely leave a lens hood mounted.

post #70 of 93

Also note that the iCloud cover is completely different, leaving one to wonder, just how many pictures did the photographer have to take before the sun was in the wrong position to create the flare.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

 

Interesting.

 

 

 

I'm not a photography expert (which I'm sure you are), but when doing a test like this, shouldn't the pictures be taken in the same position and at roughly the same time of day?

 

I only mention it because the crane in the background seems to be in a completely different position.

post #71 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

 

The iPhone has a fixed focal length lens. Zooming is just cropping.

That's ok... by doing it in-camera you move the bright object closer to the optical axis, which seems to reduce the problem, and you can keep that object in (or near) the picture. Of course you may lose some other part of the scene of interest. Also obviously, the image will be up-sampled, so not quite as sharp... although probably not noticeable unless you zoom way in.


Edited by irobot2004 - 10/2/12 at 8:26am
post #72 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by irobot2004 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

 

The iPhone has a fixed focal length lens. Zooming is just cropping.

That's ok... by doing it in-camera you move the bright object closer to the optical axis, which seems to reduce the problem, and you can keep that object in (or near) the picture. Of course you may lose some other part of the scene of interest. Also obviously, the image will be up-sampled, so not quite as sharp... although probably not noticeable unless you zoom way in.

 

I see what you mean. It will significantly degrade image quality though because you are shrinking the image size on the sensor. In most ways you would be better off just reframing the shot with the light source more towards the center of the frame.

post #73 of 93

Yes, it will be interpolated... that's the "upsampling" comment I added with an edit, which you may not have seen before you replied. As you say, you may get better results by not zooming, and doing it after the fact in a program like Photoshop as you say, assuming you really want a certain composition. It's just quicker doing it in camera if you can get the composition you want. I haven't actually looked at any of the zoomed in images closeup on a computer, so can't speak to the quality of their interpolator, but on the iPhone screen it looked fie ;-)

post #74 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by irobot2004 View Post

Yes, it will be interpolated... that's the "upsampling" comment I added with an edit, which you may not have seen before you replied. As you say, you may get better results by not zooming, and doing it after the fact in a program like Photoshop as you say, assuming you really want a certain composition. It's just quicker doing it in camera if you can get the composition you want. I haven't actually looked at any of the zoomed in images closeup on a computer, so can't speak to the quality of their interpolator, but on the iPhone screen it looked fie ;-)

I didn't actually mean that you would get better results with post-processing (you might) - just that the uncropped image with the light source nearer the axis would be sharper. The main problem with such small cameras is not a lack of pixels, it's image sharpness at the sensor plane.
post #75 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post


Otherwise: this is a flawed design. Steve would fire Tim on the spot. 

No he wouldn't have.

1. Tim is not a designer
2. This change could have been Steve's idea. Tech design moves slow enough that even the iPhone 6 (in two years) could easily have elements designed by Steve. Or at least based on his ideas. Two years after that we might still see Steve bits in iPhones. iPads and computers during that time as well.
post #76 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

'Everyone' you know with an iPhone 5 has this problem? Even when many (like me) have never experienced it once after a couple hundred photos?
'Many of the Apple users you know' are returning the phones? Yeah, I call bullshit on that. Complete bullshit.

Nope. It's totally true.

Mind you he knows like ten people with an iPhone 5 so . . . .
post #77 of 93

It amazes me what people will do to smear a company. Even if this crap makes the mainstream news, I'm pretty sure Apple will still make bank and customers won't care. 

As for that comparison with the SIII and the HTC One...it really didn't kill the iPhone 5. It just proved more that all cameras are prone to lens flare/haze. Some are purple and some are not. Some are more pronounced and some are less. Wow. Move on. Why can't we find something truly wrong with the iPhone 5? No, Maps doesn't count (and I haven't had any problems with it, but thats me). Find one glaringly huge problem with the iPhone 5. Scuffgate? All phones, no matter the price, are gonna get scratched and beat up. Get a case or just be careful. Came from the factory like that? I'm sure Apple will replace it if they haven't already. Move on. Fringgate? Really? This is the next best thing the Apple-haters can come up with? Purple lens flares and haze?

 

Steve Jobs (from beyond): Don't point it at the sun or have a bright light source sitting just to the edge of your photos. No big deal.

 

What's next, guys? People with small, child-like hands have problems using the iPhone 5 as suggested with one hand and sue Apple for false advertising? Grow up.

Samsung Galaxy series: Faster on a benchmark, not in your hand.

Reply

Samsung Galaxy series: Faster on a benchmark, not in your hand.

Reply
post #78 of 93
So which is the correct terminology: cameragate or lensgate?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #79 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

So which is the correct terminology: cameragate or lensgate?

 

How about idiotgate?


Edited by Hiro - 10/3/12 at 9:46am
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #80 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightstriker View Post

Crappy Map, terrible camera, buggy cellular.... Apple is doom!

Just wait, when all the electronics and electricity in the world shuts down and won't turn back on, you'll be begging for that POS iPhone 5.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple says purple fringing is normal for iPhone 5 camera