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iPhone adoption among teens hits 40% in U.S., iPad at 31%

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Results from Piper Jaffray's semi-annual survey of 7,700 U.S. teens illustrated Apple's hold on the market, with 40 percent of respondents saying they own an iPhone while another 62 percent are looking to buy one as their next phone.

Analyst Gene Munster noted that Apple continues to enjoy healthy growth with the younger demographic, as the 40 percent number is up from 34 percent in Spring 2012, and 23 percent in Fall 2011.

The analyst pointed out that Apple was able to expand its market share among teens without introducing new products between the Spring and Fall 2012 surveys. Continued growth is expected as 62 percent of respondents from the most recent survey plan to purchase an iPhone when they upgrade. In comparison, 22 percent of teens surveyed said they planned to buy an Android device.

"Overall, we expect Apple devices to continue to expand in teen ownership and believe that the
company is set up well to benefit from loyalty among its younger user base," Munster said.

Teen Survey
Source: Piper Jaffray


Going further, Munster noted an increase in tablet use among teens, with 44 percent currently owning such a device compared to 34 percent in Spring 2012 and 29 percent in Fall 2011. Of the teens who owned a tablet, 72 percent had an iteration of the iPad, up two percent from Spring. As for those students who did not own a tablet, but plan to purchase one in the next six months, 74 percent said they plan to buy an iPad.

With tablet adoption increasing in all sectors, Apple's much-rumored iPad mini could be a boon for the teen market as the 7.85-inch tablet is expected to carry a lower price tag than its bigger brother.

"The smaller iPad appears to be an attractive option for teens as 43% of teens planning on buying a tablet said they would be more likely to do so if Apple released a smaller iPad at $299," Munster said.

Last week, a report claimed Apple has started production of the small form factor iPad, with Asian suppliers said to have received orders for over 10 million units to be built in the fourth quarter. It is rumored that Apple will send out invitations on Oct. 10 to a media event at which the iPad mini will be unveiled.
post #2 of 28

Abject nonsense. 

 

Not doubting the numbers, just shaking my head at them. 

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post #3 of 28

As an anecdote I have noticed a fairly high demand for exchange micro SIM's when people upgrade to the iPhone 5, as older iPhones (mainly 4's) are passed on to other family members, many of them teens.

 

That would have some effect on this survey.

 

It's something you don't see so much with two year old handsets from other manufacturers.

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post #4 of 28
I'd like to know what is the percentage of teens that use a smartphone, as well as how many teens have a cellphone at all. Otherwise this number is sort of meaningless.

I'm also not exactly sure how the tablet data is supposed to fit with the cellphone data ... do the teens with tablets also have cellphones? And if so what is the percentage?

I totally believe the rumored Apple mini-tablet is aimed at this market which is also the primary market for the iPod Touch.

If as I suspect teen smartphone ownership is increasing (whether by new purchases, or by inheriting their parents old phones), that seriously undercuts the Touch market, making a smaller more portable, affordable tablet a perfect replacement for it.
post #5 of 28

So they're not all buying Android phones like the iHaters have said?  Only "old" folks buy them?

Jeez, are the iHaters wrong yet AGAIN??

post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

I'd like to know what is the percentage of teens that use a smartphone, as well as how many teens have a cellphone at all. Otherwise this number is sort of meaningless.
 

I'm sure that info is in the report however the new trend in Internet journalism is to NOT link to the article source because that might take a visitor away from your pages. Heaven forbid actually providing useful details like the full text, especially when it might contribute to your bounce rate on the page. That certainly would not be a good thing for ad impression rates.

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post #7 of 28
I quests the statistic soundness of their methods.

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(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I quests the statistic soundness of their methods.

 


  • 40% own an iPhone.
  • 62% planned to buy an iPhone as their next phone.
  • 44% own a tablet.
  • 72% of those tablets were iPads.
  • Of the 20% of students who didn't own a tablet, but plan to buy one in the next 6 months, 74% want an iPad.
  • 43% of teens planning on buying a tablet said they would be more likely to do so if Apple released a smaller iPad at $299.

Where do you see a statistics problem here?

post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

 


  • 40% own an iPhone.
  • 62% planned to buy an iPhone as their next phone.
  • 44% own a tablet.
  • 72% of those tablets were iPads.
  • Of the 20% of students who didn't own a tablet, but plan to buy one in the next 6 months, 74% want an iPad.
  • 43% of teens planning on buying a tablet said they would be more likely to do so if Apple released a smaller iPad at $299.

Where do you see a statistics problem here?

dont think its a problem with the stats, as much as how accurate they are - how obtained - sample population etc...

post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

dont think its a problem with the stats, as much as how accurate they are - how obtained - sample population etc...

I am sure it is the same polling stats that show Android Tablets with 48% US market share.  Error is ±30% or so.

 

I find web stats as one of the better indicators of share though there is a fixed in bias but it is repeatable from month to month.

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I quests the statistic soundness of their methods.
 
Why?  All they are doing is taking a sample of particular demographic and asking them questions.  Now, if they did it randomly at a particular place, then the place should be indicative of the cross section of the country.
But this is Piper Jafray, and since they've been in this industry for a while, they kind of have to use the best practices approach to getting their numbers, because if they consistently give bad stock advice, they lose credibility, then they lose customers. Gene Munster is one of the more consistent analysts for Apple stock, sometimes he is a little over the numbers, but he is still more accurate than the others.
post #12 of 28

how come they only listed three questions?  I am wondering what other questions they asked and what the responses were.

post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

So they're not all buying Android phones like the iHaters have said?  Only "old" folks buy them?

Jeez, are the iHaters wrong yet AGAIN??

Android phones, have in the past, sold more to teenagers than adults.  The surveys I saw months ago was that iPhones typically sold to adults over a certain age, in the 30's I believe, had at least a degree and had a decent income.   Android users also tended to spend less money on accessories and applications and content than iPhone users, which is good for Apple and not good for Google.

 

If Google doesn't charge for the OS and their users typically don't spend much money on content and accessories, then they can't really make much additional money just because they have a decent sized user base.

 

Windows phones/tablets just simply don''t have very many people actually buying the hardware, so it doesn't matter.  Oh well.  Microsoft can't control everyone all of the time, only those that are forced into buying their platform.

post #14 of 28
I agree with the survey, but i honestly think that the numbers should be higher. I am a Junior in high school, and 90% of my friends have iPhones, and just about 90% of the kids in my school have one, if not they are getting one in the next 6 months, especially with Christmas being right around the corner. When i first got an iPhone in 7th grade (iPhone 3G) It was brand new, i was one of the maybe 10 or 15 kids in my school that had one, when the iPhone 4 came out, i was maybe one of 150 kids, then once the iPhone 4 came to Verizon, everyone had one. About two third of my friends have a iPhone 4. I also work at a cell phone repair shop where i see soo many iPhones come in that are shattered, and they are kids iPhones (like little kids, like 10 and up) come in needing a repair. I rarely see anyone with an Android phone, unless it is an older model or they want to sell it.
All i am saying is that i think the numbers should be a little bit higher, more like 50% and growing to probably 60% or so once the holiday season is over. I expect the numbers to jump a lot after these next few months, especially now that the iPhone 4 is free on any carrier with a two year upgrade.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Results from Piper Jaffray's semi-annual survey of 7,700 U.S. teens illustrated Apple's hold on the market, with 40 percent of respondents saying they own an iPhone while another 62 percent are looking to buy one as their next phone.

... while another 62 percent are looking to have their parents buy them one as their next phone.

there. fixed that for ya.
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post #16 of 28

As long as the teen adoption rate is higher than the teen pregnancy rate, I'm happy.

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I'm sure that info is in the report however the new trend in Internet journalism is to NOT link to the article source because that might take a visitor away from your pages. Heaven forbid actually providing useful details like the full text, especially when it might contribute to your bounce rate on the page. That certainly would not be a good thing for ad impression rates.

To be fair, in this case the source is a report published by a bank that is distributed to their customers and not available for free on the Internet. I think they share some details beyond their customer base for publicity. The understanding is that if you like the research, you trade with Piper Jaffray, they make money from the commissions, and they keep you on their mailing list.

post #18 of 28

That is how it is here with the kids in our town also.

post #19 of 28

There are that many parents who can afford a $80-100 a month bill for their kids to have an iPhone? Wow. Where did I go wrong?

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post #20 of 28

Google claim 1,000,000 + activations per day for android, which i doubt very much.

Do hand-me-down iPhones count as a new activation ?

I guess the 1 million android activations could be a result of people handing their non-updatable crap phones to goats.

I just had to put in the goat reference as there was a news item from US about a goat being taken from a zoo, its toe nails painted pink and then returned.

I died laughing reading the article.

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post


  • 40% own an iPhone.


  • 62% planned to buy an iPhone as their next phone.


  • 44% own a tablet.


  • 72% of those tablets were iPads.


  • Of the 20% of students who didn't own a tablet, but plan to buy one in the next 6 months, 74% want an iPad.


  • 43% of teens planning on buying a tablet said they would be more likely to do so if Apple released a smaller iPad at $299.


Where do you see a statistics problem here?

I see several statistics problems:

1. Representativeness of the sample. They do not define how the sample was obtained, so we have no way of knowing if it is representative of the population as a whole.
2. No independent verification. They are relying solely on the teen's word about what they have. Since the iPhone is the 'cool' phone, it's easy to say that you have an iPhone even if your parents bought you a POS Android phone.
3. Lack of data. We have no access to the raw data so cannot verify any of the above.
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post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

As long as the teen adoption rate is higher than the teen pregnancy rate, I'm happy.

So if 51% of teens bought an iPad and 49% of them were pregnant, you'd be happy?

Shouldn't you be looking for a couple of orders of magnitude difference?
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post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


I see several statistics problems:
1. Representativeness of the sample. They do not define how the sample was obtained, so we have no way of knowing if it is representative of the population as a whole.
2. No independent verification. They are relying solely on the teen's word about what they have. Since the iPhone is the 'cool' phone, it's easy to say that you have an iPhone even if your parents bought you a POS Android phone.
3. Lack of data. We have no access to the raw data so cannot verify any of the above.

1. I'm sure they defined the sampling method, but it's not a free report. If you want to find out more, you have to pay.

2. Yeah, that's what a "survey" is. We use them in medical research as well. It's not perfect data, but it is unbiased.

3. Nobody who does expensive surveys is going to give you the raw data, so your complaint about this survey is odd. Do you complain that Nielsen doesn't give you their raw data?

post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

There are that many parents who can afford a $80-100 a month bill for their kids to have an iPhone? Wow. Where did I go wrong?

Parents probably just add a line to their family plan. At most they'd have to pay for data for their child's phone.

Every kid does not have a $100 monthly phone bill.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

 


  • 40% own an iPhone.
  • 62% planned to buy an iPhone as their next phone.
  • 44% own a tablet.
  • 72% of those tablets were iPads.
  • Of the 20% of students who didn't own a tablet, but plan to buy one in the next 6 months, 74% want an iPad.
  • 43% of teens planning on buying a tablet said they would be more likely to do so if Apple released a smaller iPad at $299.

Where do you see a statistics problem here?

 

Nowhere.

For example, 40% + 62% = 102% ?

Not a problem at all: someone who owns an iPhone can plan to buy a new one (to replace the current iPhone, or to have two phones, etc.).

 

J.

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by atokosch View Post

I agree with the survey, but i honestly think that the numbers should be higher. I am a Junior in high school, and 90% of my friends have iPhones, and just about 90% of the kids in my school have one, if not they are getting one in the next 6 months, especially with Christmas being right around the corner.

 

This is probably true to affluent areas but I'm sure the figures for, say, inner-city Detroit are very different.

 

That's the problem with surveys like this - it's really difficult to get an accurate picture for an entire nation. This appears to be an online survey which creates a biased sample group by its very nature.

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sessamoid View Post

1. I'm sure they defined the sampling method, but it's not a free report. If you want to find out more, you have to pay.
2. Yeah, that's what a "survey" is. We use them in medical research as well. It's not perfect data, but it is unbiased.
3. Nobody who does expensive surveys is going to give you the raw data, so your complaint about this survey is odd. Do you complain that Nielsen doesn't give you their raw data?

And, yet, none of your comments refutes what I said. Without knowing more details than have been provided, there is no way of knowing whether these numbers have any validity.

If they collected the numbers by sampling teens walking out of an Apple store with a package in their hands, the result would be very different than if they sampled random homeless teenagers in Brooklyn.

Similarly, it's a survey asking teens (who are very subject to peer pressure) which device they own.

Anyone who accepts these figures at face value is fooling themselves. The numbers could be legitimate, but without knowing more, it would be foolish to assume that.
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post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


And, yet, none of your comments refutes what I said. Without knowing more details than have been provided, there is no way of knowing whether these numbers have any validity.
If they collected the numbers by sampling teens walking out of an Apple store with a package in their hands, the result would be very different than if they sampled random homeless teenagers in Brooklyn.
Similarly, it's a survey asking teens (who are very subject to peer pressure) which device they own.
Anyone who accepts these figures at face value is fooling themselves. The numbers could be legitimate, but without knowing more, it would be foolish to assume that.

Then pay up and find out if it's so important to you. I don't care enough.

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