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In initial test run, Apple's Passbook accounts for 12% of MLB e-tickets

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
Major League Baseball has been quick to adopt Apple's new Passbook digital ticketing system, and the league has been "floored" with the initial results.

Bob Bowman, CEO of MLB Advance Media, told MarketWatch that in an initial run of four teams for the final two weeks of the season, 1,500 e-ticket buyers chose to have their tickets delivered via Apple's Passbook for iOS 6. In all, 12 percent of e-ticket buyers opted to receive their tickets in Passbook.

"That adoption rate really floored us ? there is no question our fans want digital tickets," Bowman said. "Fans can use the tickets, forward them to a friend, resell them, or even donate them to charity ? and they never get lost or left at home."

MLB is one of the biggest partners with Apple for its new Passbook initiative. The use of Passbook for baseball tickets was demonstrated onstage by Apple iOS chief Scott Forstall last month.

In his demo at the iPhone 5 unveiling, Forstall accessed a ticket for a San Francisco Giants baseball game he had recently attended. In the onstage example, Forstall deleted the used ticket, which prompted the Passbook application to display the digital ticket running through a virtual paper shredder.

Passbook


Ticketing support for select MLB teams has been available since the launch of iOS 6 last month through the free MLB.com At Bat application. Support is available through MLB Advanced Media for four clubs across the U.S.: the San Francisco Giants, New York Mets, Boston Red Sox and Kansas City Royals.

MLB tickets through Passbook are driven by open technology from Tickets.com. The digital tickets in iOS 6 include customary information such as the game date, opponent, time, section, row and seat.

Fans can receive and store digital tickets after completing a purchase via the official MLB.com website or official club websites. Digital tickets with Passbook are also displayed on the iPhone's lock screen as a day-of-game reminder.
post #2 of 51
I knew this was going to happen from the beginning. All the initial moans about "what is passbook good for?" And "no one supports it" will within a year's time be silenced as information like this continues to come out and Passbook support becomes ubiquitous. It will be less a question of who supports it and more a question of who doesn't. At that time all those who asked why Apple released an "unfinished product" will be silenced. In much the same way that iDevices infiltrated the workplace, iOS users will be the ones who demand passbook support from the vendors.
post #3 of 51
All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.

- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.

- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.

- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.

- The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain are not generally the same people who buy expensive high-end smart phones.

Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.

Until the day that some actual human in an actual store offers me a coupon that can be saved on my iPhone and actually tells me how to do it or does it for me, Passbook just isn't going to happen for me. I suspect that the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat.

It's just one of those useless new apps that sits on your device that you know *might* be useful someday but for the time being is just taking up space. So you put it in that folder that everyone has on the last screen that contains all the apps that Apple's marketing department forces on us, that you can't get rid of but that don't actually do anything.
post #4 of 51

I love this, love Passbook, but 1,500 fans is 12%?  Surely that is a typo?

post #5 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.
 

 

Agree, but remember the option to "add to passbook" will be available via web, email, text, etc.  So I don't think the app will need to be installed on your phone for that.  I think.

post #6 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

I love this, love Passbook, but 1,500 fans is 12%?  Surely that is a typo?

It's fans who are at the same time e-ticket buyers. I think 12% might be plausible.

post #7 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

I love this, love Passbook, but 1,500 fans is 12%?  Surely that is a typo?


Remember what it said, it's only 12% of e-ticket buyers (and only for these four teams). I guess not that many people are even getting e-tickets at this point?

post #8 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

I love this, love Passbook, but 1,500 fans is 12%?  Surely that is a typo?'

"12 percent of e-ticket buyers opted to receive their tickets in Passbook"

post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.
- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.
- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.
- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.
 

 

 

The UI will be refined. I agree that having to download an App first and then wander through their UI to get linked to Passport is kludgy at best. It seems like interested parties should list their stores/services within Passbook so I can select them from there.

 

That said, I took the time to download the Starbucks App and then linked my gold card to Passbook and immediately set off for my high tech caffeinated adventure. As I approached the Starbucks, their logo appeared on my lock screen. All I had to do was unlock my phone and wave it in front of their laser scanner to pay for my drink + sammy. Unlike my card, I knew my balance beforehand and it updated a few minutes after my purchase.

 

I'd say that was pretty nifty. The process of discovery will be refined. It was worth the effort to install and link, but Gazoobee has a point about wanting individual apps taking up precious space on our devices. An in-App list would be fine and if I wanted additional features, then I could opt to install the additional App specific to the product/service.

post #10 of 51
Code:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

snip

Coupons?? Saving ten cents?? You might want to do a little research as to what Apple's Passbook offers.

It's not for coupon clippers nor is it for people seeking 'bargains or hot deals' its very much the very beginning of an e-wallet ... Starting off with organizing your travel boarding passes, movie and sporting event tickets and 'cash cards' for places like Starbucks where people often pay from 'refillable credit cards' .

This will likely expand greatly over the next year.

I for one would like to see a fast food Passbook app... I can prepare a brand new order or use a 'bookmarked meal' and simply walk up to the cashier and scan the on screen code, imagine never again ordering a 'double hold the cheese' and get home only to find it has a slice of melted cheese sitting right on top AND if you do still get a wrong order you can know for certain that the order builder screwed up.
Edited by DaveGee - 10/10/12 at 8:32am
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post #11 of 51

Ah!  I missed that part, thanks.  I love Passbook.

 

Also, I have been thinking about it the last few days, and I believe the combination of Passbook, Square Wallet, and Paypal Here spell the end of NFC, unless Apple does put it into the next iPhone.  While security needs to be worked out with Square and Paypal (how can we be sure the cashier is charging the correct person?), why would anyone use an NFC enabled phone when you can pay without physically pulling out your wallet OR phone?  I have been reading up on Paypal and Square's method and I'm pretty damn impressed.  

 

Any thoughts?

post #12 of 51
Here is the most interesting part:

"Bowman says. “Fans can use the tickets, forward them to a friend, resell them, or even donate them to charity – and they never get lost or left at home"
post #13 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

Here is the most interesting part:
"Bowman says. “Fans can use the tickets, forward them to a friend, resell them, or even donate them to charity – and they never get lost or left at home"

I wonder wether somebody finds a hack to enable forwarding and still keeping a copy in your own phone or more so, how apple is going to protect against this kind of thing.

post #14 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit_Coach View Post

I wonder wether somebody finds a hack to enable forwarding and still keeping a copy in your own phone or more so, how apple is going to protect against this kind of thing.

It will be like online voucher. You can do that (if you're desperate) but you will lose business because nobody will trust you any more.
post #15 of 51

Passbook is great! it's keeping Game Center company in my Junk folder.

post #16 of 51
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post
Passbook is great! it's keeping Game Center company in my Junk folder.

 

What does that have to do with Passbook?

Originally posted by Relic

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Originally posted by Relic

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post #17 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.
- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.
- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.
- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.
- The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain are not generally the same people who buy expensive high-end smart phones.
Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.
Until the day that some actual human in an actual store offers me a coupon that can be saved on my iPhone and actually tells me how to do it or does it for me, Passbook just isn't going to happen for me. I suspect that the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat.
It's just one of those useless new apps that sits on your device that you know *might* be useful someday but for the time being is just taking up space. So you put it in that folder that everyone has on the last screen that contains all the apps that Apple's marketing department forces on us, that you can't get rid of but that don't actually do anything.

I totally get where you are coming from, it's the same for me with Maps and the yelp integration etc. I don't want a flood of apps taking up space. 

As an idea passbook is brilliant, I just wish Apple had worked out a way for people to integrate it without loads of apps that I really do not want clogging up my iPhone.

iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.
- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.
- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.
- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.
- The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain are not generally the same people who buy expensive high-end smart phones.
Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.
Until the day that some actual human in an actual store offers me a coupon that can be saved on my iPhone and actually tells me how to do it or does it for me, Passbook just isn't going to happen for me. I suspect that the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat.
It's just one of those useless new apps that sits on your device that you know *might* be useful someday but for the time being is just taking up space. So you put it in that folder that everyone has on the last screen that contains all the apps that Apple's marketing department forces on us, that you can't get rid of but that don't actually do anything.

As you say, 10's of thousands won't get it, but tens of millions will. As for extra apps, right now, they are needed for much of this, but it's very possible that, in the future, they won't be.

I understand that for something like Starbucks, where you actually pay for the product, in Passbook, you need an app in order to easily link to their site to put a payment into the app for Passbook. I've already used this, and it works very well.

But just remember that this is the first iteration of the system. It's very possible that Apple is working on something more transparent. The talk about Apple using your iTunes account makes sense, as it's linked to a credit card already, and there are over 450 million people with active iTunes accounts.

This makes much more sense than NFC. Even Samsung doesn't think that NFC is a good solution.
post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.
- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.
- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.
- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.
- The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain are not generally the same people who buy expensive high-end smart phones.
Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.
Until the day that some actual human in an actual store offers me a coupon that can be saved on my iPhone and actually tells me how to do it or does it for me, Passbook just isn't going to happen for me. I suspect that the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat.
It's just one of those useless new apps that sits on your device that you know *might* be useful someday but for the time being is just taking up space. So you put it in that folder that everyone has on the last screen that contains all the apps that Apple's marketing department forces on us, that you can't get rid of but that don't actually do anything.

The actual problem is that you don't really care to understand how it really works, so you have made a bunch of false statements about Passbook and then called it "stupid" even though almost every one of your ill-informed points was wrong. All of your rhetoric is steeped statements trying to make other people feel foolish like, "The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain" and "It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps" and also trying to make others feel out of touch by saying things like, "the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat" like everyone agrees with you even though (based on the article above) they don't.

 

So, you do not have to install other apps, as a matter of fact passbook is doing exactly what you want, cutting down on app "Clutter" by having a universal app to consolidate functionality. You can add Passbook codes from the web right here for free (with no app needed): http://www.passsource.com Go to it on an iOS device and you can just add them to your passbook right from the web. When you buy tickets online, sites are beginning to support "add them to your passbook" no other app required. If you do it from your computer, you can email the file to yourself and add it.

 

Now, lots of apps are adding passbook functionality within their apps so if you do use it (like Fandango to buy movie tickets) you can add them to passbook. Wouldn't be "stupid" for them not too support it within their apps?

 

Man, get informed before calling other people idiots.

post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheUnfetteredMind View Post


Remember what it said, it's only 12% of e-ticket buyers (and only for these four teams). I guess not that many people are even getting e-tickets at this point?

It requires actual work to get an e-ticket, and then you must print it out. This is still a new concept to most people. By eliminating the printing step it will be made much easier.

These things take time. Smartphones have been out for more than 13 years, and it's only now that their use is approaching 50%, and that's only in richer countries. It took the iPhone to bring the idea of a smartphone to the general populace. Without that, use might still be stuck in the 10% range here, and less in other places.

How many of the MBL e-ticket buyers even have an iPhone, and how many of them are really aware of this feature? How many MBL fans have an iPhone? What percentage of MBL iPhone users are buying e-tickets, and what percentage of those are using Passport?

I think those are more useful statistics.

So Passbook is very new. It needs to be out for at least a year before we can determine where it's going, and how successful if will be. A few weeks tells us little, unless adoption rises very quickly.
post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post

Code:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

snip

Coupons?? Saving ten cents?? You might want to do a little research as to what Apple's Passbook offers.

It's not for coupon clippers nor is it for people seeking 'bargains or hot deals' its very much the very beginning of an e-wallet ... Starting off with organizing your travel boarding passes, movie and sporting event tickets and 'cash cards' for places like Starbucks where people often pay from 'refillable credit cards' .

This will likely expand greatly over the next year.

I for one would like to see a fast food Passbook app... I can prepare a brand new order or use a 'bookmarked meal' and simply walk up to the cashier and scan the on screen code, imagine never again ordering a 'double hold the cheese' and get home only to find it has a slice of melted cheese sitting right on top AND if you do still get a wrong order you can know for certain that the order builder screwed up.

If they could have it for the drive-thru, that would be convenient. Those transactions are quite error-prone the way they are done now.

post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


As you say, 10's of thousands won't get it, but tens of millions will. As for extra apps, right now, they are needed for much of this, but it's very possible that, in the future, they won't be.
I understand that for something like Starbucks, where you actually pay for the product, in Passbook, you need an app in order to easily link to their site to put a payment into the app for Passbook. I've already used this, and it works very well.
But just remember that this is the first iteration of the system. It's very possible that Apple is working on something more transparent. The talk about Apple using your iTunes account makes sense, as it's linked to a credit card already, and there are over 450 million people with active iTunes accounts.
This makes much more sense than NFC. Even Samsung doesn't think that NFC is a good solution.

What I would like to know is what purchases made through Passbook will cost the merchant. The CC co's charge a hefty 2 - 3%, and I would love to bypass them altogether. Does anybody know how the financial transactions work behind Passbook? And what are the costs and to whom?

post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.

Perhaps you are smarter than the average user, and perhaps you're not.  In either case, perhaps you'll get it in a visceral way if you actually take a moment to use Passbook.  I've done so for boarding passes with two different airlines, for a baseball game, and for my occasional purchases at Starbucks.  It is simple, straight-forward, and works just as advertised.  I haven't experienced any glitches.  My guess is this will become one of the most widely used new elements of iOS 6.

post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

 
This makes much more sense than NFC. Even Samsung doesn't think that NFC is a good solution.

My question would be, if Samsung develops a Passbook-like feature, will people trust Samsung with their credit card numbers?

post #25 of 51

For her birthday, my fourteen year old daughter wants to go to see the Dylan concert this weekend. Bought the tickets online ... LiveNation or whatever. They charge you an extra premium ($2.50)  on top of all the other crazy fees for the privilege of printing the tickets out at home on a letter sized piece of paper that is mostly ads that they have sold to local restaurants, etc.  I would have loved to have been able to use Passbook for this. But I wonder, this company is using the convenience of printing tickets as a profit center - first with the add-on fee and second with the ad space. Will they be motivated to offer Passbook ticketing if they stand to lose these revenues? Not bloody likely, and that would be a shame.

post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

What I would like to know is what purchases made through Passbook will cost the merchant. The CC co's charge a hefty 2 - 3%, and I would love to bypass them altogether. Does anybody know how the financial transactions work behind Passbook? And what are the costs and to whom?

Right now, there is little that you can directly buy with Passport. Only Starbucks does that as far as I know. We can use out Apple app to buy at Apple's stores, but for some reason, that doesn't use Passbook. Odd!

Starbucks requires you to put money into the app through their web site, which the app links to, one reason you need the app. That money is taken from your credit card. I believe this works like a gift card. You pay for the card up front, and the credit card company takes their fee, and then it's spent over time, or all at once.

I don't consider 2-3% as a hefty charge. My company accepted all credit cards, as we had to. AMEx is the most expensive, which is why some merchants don't allow it. Transaction processing is expensive. It doesn't come out of thin air. People have to pay for convenience. Believe me, that small transaction charge is figured into pricing. Don't believe anything else you may be told.

Merchants and credit card companies lose money on the smallest purchases made on a card, as the transaction costs exceed the tiny fee. It's made up by the large dollar amounts on large purchases.
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

My question would be, if Samsung develops a Passbook-like feature, will people trust Samsung with their credit card numbers?

I imagine there will be people who would. Why not? People trust a lot of vendors with their credit cards. If a lot of people are buying their phones, I don't see why they wouldn't trust them with their credit cards. While I do t like what Samsung is doing in regard to Apple, I do have several of their products. I'm not going to maintain a jaundiced view of them in all areas.

But Samsung doesn't have the ecosystem that Apple does, and it takes years to built one up.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by battiato1981 View Post

For her birthday, my fourteen year old daughter wants to go to see the Dylan concert this weekend. Bought the tickets online ... LiveNation or whatever. They charge you an extra premium ($2.50)  on top of all the other crazy fees for the privilege of printing the tickets out at home on a letter sized piece of paper that is mostly ads that they have sold to local restaurants, etc.  I would have loved to have been able to use Passbook for this. But I wonder, this company is using the convenience of printing tickets as a profit center - first with the add-on fee and second with the ad space. Will they be motivated to offer Passbook ticketing if they stand to lose these revenues? Not bloody likely, and that would be a shame.

They are going to have to compete with the other major ticketing companies who are now using Passbook. But so far, those ticketing companies aren't allowing the purchase of tickets through Passbook. That could come in the future.
post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

My question would be, if Samsung develops a Passbook-like feature, will people trust Samsung with their credit card numbers?

I imagine there will be people who would. Why not? .....

Uhhhhhhhhh.... nevermind

post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Right now, there is little that you can directly buy with Passport. Only Starbucks does that as far as I know. We can use out Apple app to buy at Apple's stores, but for some reason, that doesn't use Passbook. Odd!
Starbucks requires you to put money into the app through their web site, which the app links to, one reason you need the app. That money is taken from your credit card. I believe this works like a gift card. You pay for the card up front, and the credit card company takes their fee, and then it's spent over time, or all at once.
I don't consider 2-3% as a hefty charge. My company accepted all credit cards, as we had to. AMEx is the most expensive, which is why some merchants don't allow it. Transaction processing is expensive. It doesn't come out of thin air. People have to pay for convenience. Believe me, that small transaction charge is figured into pricing. Don't believe anything else you may be told.
Merchants and credit card companies lose money on the smallest purchases made on a card, as the transaction costs exceed the tiny fee. It's made up by the large dollar amounts on large purchases.

 

This was my point earlier.  While I like Passbook, it seems that Square Wallet and Passbook Here will become more utilized.  I hope that Apple incorporates "Pay with iTunes" or something similar.  At that point, no physical card will be needed, nor will NFC be needed.

 

GPS will alert our phones and then we can pay via iTunes (i hope) or Square or Paypal.

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Right now, there is little that you can directly buy with Passport. Only Starbucks does that as far as I know. We can use out Apple app to buy at Apple's stores, but for some reason, that doesn't use Passbook. Odd!
Starbucks requires you to put money into the app through their web site, which the app links to, one reason you need the app. That money is taken from your credit card. I believe this works like a gift card. You pay for the card up front, and the credit card company takes their fee, and then it's spent over time, or all at once.
I don't consider 2-3% as a hefty charge. My company accepted all credit cards, as we had to. AMEx is the most expensive, which is why some merchants don't allow it. Transaction processing is expensive. It doesn't come out of thin air. People have to pay for convenience. Believe me, that small transaction charge is figured into pricing. Don't believe anything else you may be told.
Merchants and credit card companies lose money on the smallest purchases made on a card, as the transaction costs exceed the tiny fee. It's made up by the large dollar amounts on large purchases.

I am not sure about that. Most grocery stores accept card and those are often small purchases. I can't see the cc companies loosing here. Merchants pass it on to their clients. I am no expert, I just begrudgingly pay my fees. I sell higher ticket items and I don't really see how a $2000.- item is any more expensive to process than a $200.- transaction. Debit card fees are a fraction of CC fees, remember.

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit_Coach View Post

I wonder wether somebody finds a hack to enable forwarding and still keeping a copy in your own phone or more so, how apple is going to protect against this kind of thing.

I'm sure there's a bar code that gets scanned when you enter a facility (same as when you download and print your own tickets).  Once scanned, no one else gets admission with the same bar code.

 

I haven't tried the app yet and some people seem to have UI concerns, but the general idea is a good one, especially if you attend events (or fly) often.  I hate having to print out tickets/boarding passes, etc.   If they're just downloaded to the iPhone, that's a big advantage, IMO, especially if you're on the road and don't have access to a printer.   As long as it's a non-frustrating UI, having all my boarding passes and event tickets in one place is a great idea.   If there isn't already, there should be a linkage to the calendar so that clicking on a calendar event automatically brings up the tickets/passes for that event.   And buying a ticket should automatically (or give an option to) put that event in the calendar. 

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.
- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.
- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.
- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.
- The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain are not generally the same people who buy expensive high-end smart phones.
Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.
Until the day that some actual human in an actual store offers me a coupon that can be saved on my iPhone and actually tells me how to do it or does it for me, Passbook just isn't going to happen for me. I suspect that the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat.
It's just one of those useless new apps that sits on your device that you know *might* be useful someday but for the time being is just taking up space. So you put it in that folder that everyone has on the last screen that contains all the apps that Apple's marketing department forces on us, that you can't get rid of but that don't actually do anything.

the fact that you work in tech is probably why you don't get it

post #34 of 51

Acutally, merchants will see a cost savings, credit card companies will take a hit on transaction fees collected from point of sales transactions. 

 

In the case of Starbucks, because people 'load' their Starbacks Card less frequently then visiting to store (i.e. loading $50 on the Starbucks Card vs using your credit card in store accumilating $50 in charges over time).  Because Starbucks pays a transaction fee everytime a credit card is used, Starbucks will absolutely see a cost reduction. 

 

For example, if I go into a Starbuck and use my credit card to purchase a $3 coffee M-F, that's 5 transactions which translates to 5 transaction fees Starbucks has to pay to credit card companies, where as if I load my Starbucks Card once for $15 dollars, Starbucks only has to pay one transaction fee.  Starbuck absolutely love this, hence why tthey attached a 'rewards program' to their Starbucks card.

 

As this method of payment becomes more common, you can expect credit compaines (i.e. banks) to increase fee to recoup lost revenue from transaction fees.

 

Also, a law was recently passed allow merchants to charge more for credit card transactions vs using cash/check/debit card similar to gas stations.  I can see some merchants using this to encourage customers

post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

I love this, love Passbook, but 1,500 fans is 12%?  Surely that is a typo?

Depends on the teams.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #36 of 51
They need an option of buying the e-ticket online, then sending me an email with a link that will open the ticket in Passbook. That would be the best solution, rather than having all these other apps to manage alongside Passbook.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

What I would like to know is what purchases made through Passbook will cost the merchant. The CC co's charge a hefty 2 - 3%, and I would love to bypass them altogether. Does anybody know how the financial transactions work behind Passbook? And what are the costs and to whom?

Apple will handle the transaction and charge 30%
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

 

Agree, but remember the option to "add to passbook" will be available via web, email, text, etc.  So I don't think the app will need to be installed on your phone for that.  I think.

 

That is 100% correct.  I put the tickets to the Giants game I went to into Passbook by going to my SF Giants tickets page in Safari and clicking the "Add To Passbook" link.  There was no extra app to be installed.


I really like it so far.

post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit_Coach View Post

I wonder wether somebody finds a hack to enable forwarding and still keeping a copy in your own phone or more so, how apple is going to protect against this kind of thing.

 

Effectively the first person to use the ticket blocks it from the system.  If I forwarded my MLB ticket to someone else, then I went into the ballpark ahead of them, they would be refused entry.

 

It's no different to photocopying your "print at home" tickets.  The barcodes are unique and can only be used once.

post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I'm going to say (and I know I've said it before, sorry), is that I just don't "get" Passbook at all. I'm a smarter than average person and I work in tech and while I have read the explanations and do know how it's supposed to work more or less, I still don't "get it" in a visceral way. If I don't "get it" (to the point of actually being able to effectively use it in my daily life), then tens of thousands of others don't either.
- It's counter-intuitive to have an app that is useless until linked with another app, that you have to find first, install, and then link.
- It's just plain stupid to expect me to waste screens of real-estate to install apps just so they will show up in the passbook app.
- Even if I did this, it's not clear at all what happens next or how to "link" the two since the "linking" is invisible and behind the scenes.
- The kind of fools who salivate over a ten cent bargain are not generally the same people who buy expensive high-end smart phones.
Not everyone is comfortable with hundreds of apps on their phone. Many people, like me, only install a few things that they actually need/want. I'm not going to install an app for every bargain bin in my neighbourhood just so I *might* get a crappy coupon one day.
Until the day that some actual human in an actual store offers me a coupon that can be saved on my iPhone and actually tells me how to do it or does it for me, Passbook just isn't going to happen for me. I suspect that the vast majority of iPhone users are in the same boat.
It's just one of those useless new apps that sits on your device that you know *might* be useful someday but for the time being is just taking up space. So you put it in that folder that everyone has on the last screen that contains all the apps that Apple's marketing department forces on us, that you can't get rid of but that don't actually do anything.


Gazoobee, I think your looking at it all wrong.  Obviously the goal for Apple is to get as many people using passbook as possible but not everyone will.  For you it may be pointless but how about the people that even prior to passbook used to buy e tickets and make e purchases with all those apps and now have a app to keep it all tidy and in a central location.  It may not be for everybody, probably not something I'd ever use, but it's not a bad option for many others.  It's a good, safer alternative to having NFC.  Can't knock them for that unless you think the iPhone is lacking because it has no NFC which for me would be useless as I'd never use it.

 

As you see I do get what your saying as I never used the stock app or even itunes .  I don't really ever download music but you can't expect everything in iOS to cater just to yourself.  What I can say is be grateful Apple has the power to not let Carriers customize your iPhone Specifically to their taste.  You may have some useless apps that take up space but they aren't comparable to the other phones bloatware. 

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