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In initial test run, Apple's Passbook accounts for 12% of MLB e-tickets - Page 2

post #41 of 51
Used passbook for the first time this morning at starbucks. Was actually surprised I saw utility in it; I would imagine it will help limit the number of useless apps that you currently need. With the GPS fencing, it makes for some pretty cool options. With Starbucks, it did everything I used the app for previously (although I can't play with the stars in the cup anymore).

I do wish it was set up with more of a one-time pad though, rather than a fixed barcode. Not sure if that is Starbucks fault or Apple.
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

Uhhhhhhhhh.... nevermind

Not a helpful remark. Why don't you just come out and say it?
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

This was my point earlier.  While I like Passbook, it seems that Square Wallet and Passbook Here will become more utilized.  I hope that Apple incorporates "Pay with iTunes" or something similar.  At that point, no physical card will be needed, nor will NFC be needed.

GPS will alert our phones and then we can pay via iTunes (i hope) or Square or Paypal.

This is a big step. Because of that, it will be difficult to achieve. People have to get used to it, and retailers of all kinds have to feel comfortable with it, and believe it will make things easier for them (more profitable). Apple is taking the first step. There's no rush. What's the hurry?
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

I am not sure about that. Most grocery stores accept card and those are often small purchases. I can't see the cc companies loosing here. Merchants pass it on to their clients. I am no expert, I just begrudgingly pay my fees. I sell higher ticket items and I don't really see how a $2000.- item is any more expensive to process than a $200.- transaction. Debit card fees are a fraction of CC fees, remember.

The reason why so many retailers tried to prevent people from using a card with purchases under a certain amount was because it cost them money. CC companies weren't happy about that, not because they did make money on those small transactions, but because they were afraid that if people got used to not using their card for those small transactions, they might not use them for larger ones as well, where they did make money.

What you are saying about transaction costs is the opposite of what I was saying. I didn't say that transaction costs were higher for more expensive sales. What I said was that the CC companies made more profit from those sales because they get money depending on the percentage. The more the item costs, the more money they get. Transaction cost is what it costs the CC companies for processing the charge. Obviously, if they get $0.15 from a transaction, and it costs them $0.25 to process it, they lose money on that transaction. It costs them the same to process a $10,000 sale as it does a $0.99 sale where they may only get from 2 to 5 cents.

And before you ask, they do well with the very small prices in the iTunes Store, because large retailers like Apple take care of a lot of the back end work first, and sell so much, that CC companies see profits from those sales.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Apple will handle the transaction and charge 30%

No, it doesn't work that way. Starbucks isn't paying 30% to Apple. You have to go to Starbucks site to pay them. That removes the "sale" (the money you put on the card) from Apple's domain.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No, it doesn't work that way. Starbucks isn't paying 30% to Apple. You have to go to Starbucks site to pay them. That removes the "sale" (the money you put on the card) from Apple's domain.

I know, I was being facetious.
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post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbit View Post

They need an option of buying the e-ticket online, then sending me an email with a link that will open the ticket in Passbook. That would be the best solution, rather than having all these other apps to manage alongside Passbook.

How do all these people continue to repost incorrect information?

 

Go here and use from the web, no apps required. http://www.passsource.com

post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwchris View Post

How do all these people continue to repost incorrect information?

 

Go here and use from the web, no apps required. http://www.passsource.com

Be sure to use it from your phone to add them to passbook with the link, otherwise you need to email the passbook file to yourself.

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit_Coach View Post

I wonder wether somebody finds a hack to enable forwarding and still keeping a copy in your own phone or more so, how apple is going to protect against this kind of thing.

The very same way multiple photo copies of printed tickets are prevented from being used: the gate system keeps track of the ticket ID's and invalidates any number that's been used.

 

I've used the e-tickets on AMTRAK, FAR more convenient than dealing with paper.

 

As to the "multiple apps taking up screen real-estate"? Just pile them into a folder labeled "Passbook stuff".

post #50 of 51
Quote:
What I would like to know is what purchases made through Passbook will cost the merchant. The CC co's charge a hefty 2 - 3%, and I would love to bypass them altogether. Does anybody know how the financial transactions work behind Passbook? And what are the costs and to whom?

 

From what I understand, there is not a difference between using passbook and a credit card [CC] from the point of view of the merchant nor the CC network/company. Take the MLB for example, purchasing a traditional e-ticket online with a credit card will still cost the MLB [which is ultimately passed onto the consumer] the 2-3% CC charge by the Visa/Mastercard/whatever Network. With passbook it is the same. The consumer is still using their CC to purchase the ticket, the difference is that there is not a need to print the ticket out, it will simply show up on the screen of the passbook application. This does not make a difference to the CC companies/networks. Passbook does not bypass CC networks.


Edited by Alchemist1 - 10/10/12 at 8:20pm
post #51 of 51
Virgin Australia has some support as well. Used it over the weekend. (obamaface)Not Bad(/obamaface)
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