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FBI issues warning to smartphone users regarding Android malware - Page 2

post #41 of 103

Seems like nothing will satisfy you, which isn't atypical for commenters here. Human review isn't feasible for something at YouTube's scale.

post #42 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post

Seems like nothing will satisfy you, which isn't atypical for commenters here. Human review isn't feasible for something at YouTube's scale.


If Wikipedia can be reviewed by humans, so can Youtube.

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post #43 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by spacerays View Post


If Wikipedia can be reviewed by humans, so can Youtube.

Per http://www.youtube.com/t/press_statistics, "72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute." So, no, human review isn't possible for every video. You have to rely on algorithms, supplemented with limited human review.

post #44 of 103
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post
Seems like nothing will satisfy you…

 

Yeah, that's obviously the case. Not something like "Prevent all hard media downloads from the website itself and use the stolen material against the thieves by automatically cross-referencing anything in the videos with a database source and putting multiple links to the content therein below the video where it's available for legal purchase".

 

Hulu manages to do it. 

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Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #45 of 103

And what would prevent spurious take down requests of unpopular/controversial content?  Just because enough people flag it does not mean it should be taken down automatically imho. 

post #46 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post

I'm not sure what you mean by "refuse to actually do anything" -- Google regularly removes content from YouTube when receive they a DMCA notice. In fact, they've been criticized for being too aggressive about pulling content.

I can vouch for this. 

post #47 of 103
Originally Posted by thejenkas View Post
Just because enough people flag it does not mean it should be taken down automatically imho. 

 

Right! What stops third-party reports of copyright infringement is an automated system weighted away from that and toward human review. Taking humans completely out of the equation is irresponsible, even if they can't possibly handle everything.

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post #48 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Yeah, that's obviously the case. Not something like "Prevent all hard media downloads from the website itself and use the stolen material against the thieves by automatically cross-referencing anything in the videos with a database source and putting multiple links to the content therein below the video where it's available for legal purchase".

 

Hulu manages to do it. 

 

Seems like you're changing the topic a bit. Further, Hulu doesn't allow arbitrary user-uploaded content; YouTube does. And YouTube does offer links out to purchase content for some music in videos they can identify.

post #49 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Yeah, they pull down fair use utilizations while leaving up unedited, unchanged, illegal content.

Only you, and perhaps big businesses, would complain about that.

post #50 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Right! What stops third-party reports of copyright infringement is an automated system weighted away from that and toward human review. Taking humans completely out of the equation is irresponsible, even if they can't possibly handle everything.

 

TS, Google's blog statement from my earlier link:

"Content owners have uploaded more than ten million reference files to the Content ID system. At that scale, mistakes can and do happen. To address this, we’ve improved the algorithms that identify potentially invalid claims. We stop these claims from automatically affecting user videos and place them in a queue to be manually reviewed. This process prevents disputes that arise when content not owned by a partner inadvertently turns up in a reference file.

Smarter claim detection minimizes unintentional mistakes. Of course, we take action in rare cases of intentional misuse, up to and including terminating Content ID access."

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post #51 of 103
Originally Posted by CGJ View Post
Only you, and perhaps big businesses, would complain about that.

 

No, I'm pretty sure the average person is okay with getting their stuff legally and having illegal stuff removed. 

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post #52 of 103
But this okay. Due to its OPEN nature, the exploits will be patched by a bunch of random, good-natured citizens working feverishly in their mothers' basements. Stay tuned, as an update is on the horizon.
post #53 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

the entire Frasier series is up about 3 or 4 times over.  I've also watched countless operas and movies, many of which are still up.  And I haven't even been looking, really.

I've heard there's a loophole when a movie is broken up into segments.
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post #54 of 103

Turn off any features you don't understand or need. Hilarious.

 

Android users: Be afraid, be very afraid.

 

How do you put a price on fear.

post #55 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogJack View Post

Android users: Be afraid, be very afraid.

 

Be afraid of what, exactly? Shoddy reporting? These apps cannot install themselves automatically, and they're blocked by the default config. This is a non-story.

post #56 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogJack View Post

Turn off any features you don't understand or need. Hilarious.

 

Android users: Be afraid, be very afraid.

 

How do you put a price on fear.

 

I can't get all happy because some Android users, who are likely regular folks like you and me, are getting pwned.  Frankly, iOS has vulnerabilities too.  Any exploit that we use to jailbreak is a vulnerability that can be used to be malicious.

 

Odds are the annoying fandroids aren't going to get nailed by this sort thing anyway because they are one of the handful actually running CyanogenMod X:UberBasementEdition. 

post #57 of 103

derek, mon pauvre, this is just the beginning. 

post #58 of 103

Hahahaha.1biggrin.gif

 

Android is open alright, it's open to all sorts of viruses and malware.lol.gif

 

Be prepared to wipe your entire phone clean every night and you can root it every day when you wake up. Maybe that will help. lol.gif

 

And honestly speaking, if I were a thief or a hacker, I wouldn't even bother to target Android users, as most Android devices are lower end devices made for poor people without much money. What's the point of stealing their info? There probably isn't much of value to steal.1smoking.gif

post #59 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

 

I can't get all happy because some Android users, who are likely regular folks like you and me, are getting pwned.  Frankly, iOS has vulnerabilities too.  Any exploit that we use to jailbreak is a vulnerability that can be used to be malicious.

 

Odds are the annoying fandroids aren't going to get nailed by this sort thing anyway because they are one of the handful actually running CyanogenMod X:UberBasementEdition. 

Yes, I hear you. It's more of a general mirth at the silliness of humanity in general. Like the Hatfields and the McCoys. Every time, every single time, without exception, when I have seen a pc user on their laptop or home machine or heard about their daily virus routine, it makes me cringe at the self inflicted horror of it all. The propensity to accept ugliness over beauty is now so ingrained into the world psyche that everyone should be concerned where it all leads. For example look at the appalling american led infantilisation of women which is making the world into a place that deserves what it gets. I do not really find it funny at all.

 

/<rant>

post #60 of 103

To actually get this stuff running the Android user has to manually install the shady downloaded app, while confirming all of the security permissions in the process.  Though before this step is accessible, they'll need to have already turned on the system wide option to install packages from unknown sources.  There's no way for a package to automatically install on it's own.

 

You're equally likely to get malicious wares through Cydia on a jailbroken iPhone.  Are there even warnings about permissions/data access in that environment?

post #61 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Hahahaha.1biggrin.gif

 

Android is open alright, it's open to all sorts of viruses and malware.lol.gif

 

Fandroids, be prepared to wipe your entire phone clean every night and you can root it every day when you wake up. Maybe that will help. lol.gif

 

And honestly speaking, if I were a thief or a hacker, I wouldn't even bother to target Android users, as most Android devices are lower end devices made for cheap people without much money. What's the point of stealing a bum's info? There probably isn't much of value to steal.1smoking.gif

 

There's no need for such panic.  Generally anyone sporting some type of consciousness will avoid malicious software on an Android device.  There are plenty of wealthy people use Android devices.  Sure there are more 'poor' people with cheaper Android phones... because Apple has chosen not to offer something that fits their budget.  Someone who thinks they are "rich" and "better" than other people because they worship Apple wouldn't understand any of this.

post #62 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jivanile View Post

Who cares if someone can steal my information so easy, it has sd card expansion slots, removable batteries, widgets, and you can swipe your palm to take a screenshot. Malware Shmalware.

LolZ~!!!!!!!!

 

 

So glad Apple is cutting the head off of the snake!  Google Maps app, YouTube (Lolz - The Google version is soooo hideously baddddddah) and the further expansion of search... I say ban everything Google.....

post #63 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neo42 View Post

 

There's no need for such panic.  Generally anyone sporting some type of consciousness will avoid malicious software on an Android device.  There are plenty of wealthy people use Android devices.  Sure there are more 'poor' people with cheaper Android phones... because Apple has chosen not to offer something that fits their budget.  Someone who thinks they are "rich" and "better" than other people because they worship Apple wouldn't understand any of this.

 

Dude, BOTTOM LINE ---  When has there EVER been an ad advertising a SALE on an IPHONE just weeks or months after it's release?  Two for one specials is Google's and Samdung's best way to steal market share, something apparently Wall Street Cheaters miss...... Cricket, cricket...

 

This sunday, Best Buy had thar Samdung SIII for $100 off with contract....A full page Ad no less. Gee they must be flying off the shelves for such a need to MARK THEM DOWN so dang soon.  Gimme a break. 

 

Hey Samdung --  your "clever, funny ad campaign" not working?????!!!!

post #64 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogJack View Post

derek, mon pauvre, this is just the beginning. 

Hardly. This isn't the first baseless, hysterical Android malware hit piece I've seen, and it won't be the last. Every few weeks we see some new inflated claim from a security consultancy that Android malware increased dramatically. But if you look closely, you'll see they almost never disclose their methodology, which makes it hard to take them seriously. Also, it appears that many of them curiously classify adware as malware, leading to inflated numbers. In most cases, these companies are trying to scare Android users into buying their anti-virus products, which are snakeoil.

Further, when pressed, these companies admit their data is overhyped and that most malware comes from apps outside the Google Play Store. Quoting from McAfee's Q1 2012 report:
Quote:
"The great majority of mobile attacks, and their malware, stem from and attack third-party markets,
particularly in China and Russia. In most cases, we do not find this malware in the official Android
market. Google’s app store has suffered from some incidents, but so far those counts are moderate.
McAfee Labs advises customers to use install software only from the official market. That step should
greatly reduce the risk of compromising your Android device."

And it's worth repeating that third-party app stores are blocked by default. Users have to go into their security settings and click through this dialog to enable them:



You'd think that at some point people would start looking at the actual data instead of the hype. I'm still waiting for that to happen. To be clear, I'm not suggesting that Android is flawless; no OS is. And there are areas where one can make legitimate, data-driven criticisms of Android security. But these malware scare pieces aren't among them.

It's also worth asking -- why does Apple Insider continue to run these anti-Android hit pieces? I don't see this sort of platform bashing on other tech news sites. Android Central doesn't run stories trashing iOS; WMPowerUser doesn't feel the need to bash Android, etc. But I see quite a bit of this hit pseudo-journalism on Apple-related sites.
post #65 of 103

New Samsung ad.

 

Open on the usual gang of Apple hipster stereotypes standing around in the neverending line-up outside the Apple store.

 

Barista #1: "Hey, I hear this year, they're giving us all the cool features we didn't get last year."

 

Barista #2: "I hope so, but all that matters is the Apple logo on the back."

 

Barista #3: "No kidding!"

 

Two unfathomably awesome guys stand nearby and tap their phones together. 

 

Barista #2: "Whoa! What are those awesome sci-fi gadgets?!"

 

Awesome Guy #1: "It's the Samsung Galaxy SIII with all the cool features you're still waiting for. We just traded playlists."

 

Awesome Guy #2: "Um, dude my phone is rebooting."

 

Awesome Guy #1: "Huh? Oh, so is mine."

 

Awesome Guy #2: "Now it's not coming back up. Oh &#$%! This is bad. What did you do to my phone?!"

 

Awesome Guy #1: "Don't blame me, you jerk! I'm running anti-virus software!"

 
Barista #1: "Trade playlists! I hope we can do that next year."
 
Barista #2: "Well, maybe not."
post #66 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post

Of course, no where in this article or any of its sources does it claim that this is an issue for apps in the Play Store. Most malware is found in shady, third-party stores.
Further, Dilger's claim that "FinFisher is installed by simply visiting a Web link or opening a text message that disguises itself as a system update" is misleading. Android devices block third-party app stores by default. Unless a user has gone into their security settings, they don't be able to install an app that they download from an arbitrary web page. (It's worth noting that Dilger's wording, "installed," is different from the FBI's wording, "transmitted to.")
In other words, nothing to see here, folks.

How do you get the free java program of the day from Amazon?

 

Then there are the phone manufacturer stores and phone network stores.

 

Can you configure a list of trusted sources or is it one in all in?

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post #67 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

The original iPhone gained this feature (once the App Store was opened) through the App Store a long time ago. I remember downloading the App (Can't remember it's name now, and am at work, so can't look it up), and using it maybe once.

 

Next time I upgraded my phone, I deleted the app.

 

The only benefit to this feature in practice I have noticed is sharing Contacts. But it is a clumsy way to do it. Sending contacts via Message is far easier. It helps when you have poor service though, or are sharing your contact with someone whose number you don't have.

Bump, it was the one billionth App download.

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post #68 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by derekmorr View Post


Hardly. This isn't the first baseless, hysterical Android malware hit piece I've seen, and it won't be the last. Every few weeks we see some new inflated claim from a security consultancy that Android malware increased dramatically. But if you look closely, you'll see they almost never disclose their methodology, which makes it hard to take them seriously. Also, it appears that many of them curiously classify adware as malware, leading to inflated numbers. In most cases, these companies are trying to scare Android users into buying their anti-virus products, which are snakeoil.
Further, when pressed, these companies admit their data is overhyped and that most malware comes from apps outside the Google Play Store. Quoting from McAfee's Q1 2012 report:
And it's worth repeating that third-party app stores are blocked by default. Users have to go into their security settings and click through this dialog to enable them:

You'd think that at some point people would start looking at the actual data instead of the hype. I'm still waiting for that to happen. To be clear, I'm not suggesting that Android is flawless; no OS is. And there are areas where one can make legitimate, data-driven criticisms of Android security. But these malware scare pieces aren't among them.
It's also worth asking -- why does Apple Insider continue to run these anti-Android hit pieces? I don't see this sort of platform bashing on other tech news sites. Android Central doesn't run stories trashing iOS; WMPowerUser doesn't feel the need to bash Android, etc. But I see quite a bit of this hit pseudo-journalism on Apple-related sites.

 

 

Oh Ok, like nearly ALL the "pieces" (no pun intended) against Apple the last three weeks weren't HIT pieces?  If not, what were they?  

post #69 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

How do you get the free java program of the day from Amazon?

Then there are the phone manufacturer stores and phone network stores.

Can you configure a list of trusted sources or is it one in all in?

It isn't a Java program. It's a Dalvik program. Android doesn't use the Java Virtual Machine.

To install the Amazon App Store, you have to enable third-party markets, or use an Amazon Android device. Even if you enable third-party apps, apps aren't installed automatically. The user is still prompted to install them. The install lists the permissions the app needs -- the user can clearly see if the app wants access to personal information or to services that potentially cost money.

Currently, it is a global on/off toggle. I'd like it to be more configurable, but that doesn't negate my point.
post #70 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neo42 View Post

 Generally anyone sporting some type of consciousness will avoid malicious software on an Android device.  

 

I think that you're overestimating the average customer. The average customer is not somebody who spends time on tech forums and might know about these things. The average customer is clueless.

post #71 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

How do you get the free java program of the day from Amazon?

You can't unless you override the default Android security settings as shown in Derekmorr's screenshot.

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post #72 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jivanile View Post

Who cares if someone can steal my information so easy, it has sd card expansion slots, removable batteries, widgets, and you can swipe your palm to take a screenshot. Malware Shmalware.

Yes this is a non event for my Android Phone!

I have nothing valuable on it. Only a 6 entry address book.

They'll not get my expansion card info, because I remove it between calls.

My batteries are safe, I always carry them in secure pocket, because I often need them after 8 hrs of use.

Nope I don't do screen shots, that's a real security exposure!

post #73 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by gijoeinla View Post


Oh Ok, like nearly ALL the "pieces" (no pun intended) against Apple the last three weeks weren't HIT pieces?  If not, what were they?  

The first and most important difference there is that there was actually news in the articles about Maps. Apple removed a perfectly functional app and replaced with something less functional (note that I didn't say the new app is useless because it isn't). Furthermore the story was picked up by the media broadly. The media ran their (usually) one story per source. Some tech blogs posted multiple stories. This site posted the most that I saw anywhere.

The second difference is that this story serves nobody in the site's target audience (Apple users) and is obviously telling half-truths in order to add to a myth that's popular among readers here. Basically this article was only written to spread misinformation whereas the articles you're referring to were pertinent to the audience and were factual, designed to inform the many iPhone users of something important to know before upgrading. I never saw an article that said anything like, “Do not buy the iPhone 5 because Maps is unfit for consumers." Instead what they said was more like, “When you make your decision to upgrade, be aware that you will have a slightly different experience with the new Maps in the near term."
post #74 of 103
iPhone 5 thank you.
post #75 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by shompa View Post

This is PC all over again.
The big question: what is google hiding?
In my country we have a legal right to know everything a company stores on their computers about a customer. I did a legal request a month ago. Google is the only company that refuses give me the data.
I hope I win in court.

Of course Google is hiding all the info they can get on everyone. As is Facebook.
Google wants all sPhones to be open, so they can install their spying malware.
They don't care what other malware gets installed on their leaky android.

Good luck in court !
post #76 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

No, I'm pretty sure the average person is okay with getting their stuff legally and having illegal stuff removed. 

No, that's not what I said.

 

I said you are probably the only person (aside from companies) that would complain about multimedia content (and we're not talking about child porn here) not being removed.

post #77 of 103
I don't care what platform you're on, whether it be Android or IOS, Windows or OSX. Don't open strange emails, and don't run/install random programs. Some OSes may be more secure than others, but there's not such thing as 100% secure. Stay vigilant and you'll be better off.

This message brought to you by your friendly, neighborhood IT guy... and the letter M. 1wink.gif



...Off-topic...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, I'm pretty sure the average person is okay with getting their stuff legally and having illegal stuff removed. 

Not arguing your points about YouTube, but the above statement I don't agree with. The average person would be perfectly happy to get media illegally if (a) it were free/cheap, and (b) they wouldn't get caught. The average person doesn't care about copyright law no matter how many PSAs the MPAA runs before movies.

You and I may care, but the average person is greedy and selfish. Just saying...

I own...

1 Android Phone, 2 iPads, 1 Windows Tablet, 1 Mac Desktop, 1 Windows Laptop, 1 Linux Server, 1 Linux HTPC

 

They all are used regularly and each have their place. Competition is good.

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I own...

1 Android Phone, 2 iPads, 1 Windows Tablet, 1 Mac Desktop, 1 Windows Laptop, 1 Linux Server, 1 Linux HTPC

 

They all are used regularly and each have their place. Competition is good.

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post #78 of 103
Originally Posted by CGJ View Post
I said you are probably the only person (aside from companies) that would complain about multimedia content (and we're not talking about child porn here) not being removed.

 

Ah, I see what you mean. I still disagree.

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post #79 of 103

Seriously...an article about the dangers of clicking links in a "work-at-home" email is news?...only on AI. You would either have to be living without the internet for the last decade or a complete idiot to fall for that one.

 

Fortunately, I just sent over my bank information to a lawyer in Africa who found a recently deceased relative that left me a substantial inheritance, so I have no need to click on those...

post #80 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

The first and most important difference there is that there was actually news in the articles about Maps. Apple removed a perfectly functional app and replaced with something less functional (note that I didn't say the new app is useless because it isn't). Furthermore the story was picked up by the media broadly. The media ran their (usually) one story per source. Some tech blogs posted multiple stories. This site posted the most that I saw anywhere.
The second difference is that this story serves nobody in the site's target audience (Apple users) and is obviously telling half-truths in order to add to a myth that's popular among readers here. Basically this article was only written to spread misinformation whereas the articles you're referring to were pertinent to the audience and were factual, designed to inform the many iPhone users of something important to know before upgrading. I never saw an article that said anything like, “Do not buy the iPhone 5 because Maps is unfit for consumers." Instead what they said was more like, “When you make your decision to upgrade, be aware that you will have a slightly different experience with the new Maps in the near term."

If you got all your Apple maps news from Apple Insider you'd think every site had 15 articles on it.
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