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Newsweek to cease print edition, go digital-only with iPad & other platforms

post #1 of 33
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The rising cost of print has forced Newsweek to go digital-only starting in 2013, leaving its iPad app as one of the few ways to read the nearly 80-year-old publication.

The new page for Newsweek was announced by the publication and its parent company, The Daily Beast, in a post to its official website on Thursday. Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown and CEO Baba Shetty cited the "challenging economics of print publishing and distribution."

"We are transitioning Newsweek, not saying goodbye to it," they wrote. "We remain committed to Newsweek and to the journalism that it represents. This decision is not about the quality of the brand or the journalism ? that is as powerful as ever."

Shetty and Brown said Newsweek has seen a rapidly growing reader base on tablets such as Apple's market dominating iPad. They believe digital storefronts—such as Apple's Newsstand for iOS, as well as the Kindle, Zinio and Nook stores—are "superb" platforms for the publication.

As of Thursday, "Newsweek for iPad" was the No. 45 most popular free application on the iPad App Store, and it ranked No. 37 among the top grossing applications. Users have rated it an average of 2.5 stars out of 5, criticizing it for technical issues such as crashes and missing stories.

Newsstand


Apple's Newsstand debuted last year with the launch of iOS 5. Some companies, such as magazine publisher Future, have seen strong initial success on the iPad. One study released earlier this year estimated that total iPad users spend an average of $70,000 per day on Newsstand content.
post #2 of 33
And this is the future. One day paper will be like papyrus ...
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post #3 of 33

Wow...  This is huge.  The ones that will be earth shattering will be TIME and SI.

post #4 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

And this is the future. One day paper will be like papyrus ...

Good one!

Could this also be because of the Oct 23rd announcement? Emphasizing on the importance of digital publications; Greenpeace-safe, easier for school kids backs/bags et cetera...
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post #5 of 33
I'd buy that for a dollar!

Not really...
Edited by ChristophB - 10/18/12 at 7:44am
post #6 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Good one!
Could this also be because of the Oct 23rd announcement? Emphasizing on the importance of digital publications; Greenpeace-safe, easier for school kids backs/bags et cetera...

HAHAHAGreenpeaceHAHA No. It's their massive decline in readership and failure to procure sustainable advertising revenue. 

 

 

edit: forgot to mention irrelevance.

post #7 of 33

My biggest problem with iOS magazines is the implementation. Things are cool on Apple's end, but the publications themselves are enormous! I understand there are hardcore egos in the graphic layout biz, who demand a pixel-perfect recreation of their print pages, but I don't always have the bandwidth or storage space for 0.5 GB per issue.

 

Marco Arment's new magazine is how to properly make iOS publications. My hope is that since Newsweek is going entirely digital, they will no longer be held to the demands of print layout, and can provide accessible issues.

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post #8 of 33

I don't think it's so much "rising costs of print" as it is people just aren't buying printed items much anymore.  I for one haven't purchased a printed magazine in years.  I get all my info electronically now.

post #9 of 33
When you download the Newsweek app for iPhone it appears to be in Chinese. I don't get it.

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post #10 of 33
If they do a legit app and not just images or PDFs that are bloated and don't zoom etc well and price it decently this could work. It might also help if they can do it in some way where you can subscribe once and see the issues in any platform, even switch. So like I get it now in my iPad but later I buy a Kindle Fire, I can just log in somehow and see all the issues from my iPad days. Or even see them on a website.
post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

When you download the Newsweek app for iPhone it appears to be in Chinese. I don't get it.


Maybe that's normal.

post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by KindredMac View Post

Wow...  This is huge.

 

Not really. Newsweek is dying (circulation down about 65% over the past 10 years!) This is a last ditch effort for them.

 

That said, I agree print will eventually go all or mostly digital. But Newsweek is not the standard to judge by here.

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post #13 of 33

If I can store issues as well as access the archives while my subscription is current, then the all digital magazine is a good idea, especially if I can access it from multiple digital devices.

 

It has been years since I purchased a magazine too. I only read books off line, and that is because a suitable digital copy at a reasonable price isn't available.

 

The problems I have with digital magazines is the layout. Often links aren't right, the navigation is just bad, and image slide shows or videos don't work properly. It's as if they don't have a single web designer calling the shots. A good web site is barely noticeable because everything works. A bad web site really sticks out. Magazine sites (the ones I've used) usually have problems. This needs to be sorted out so that people will enjoy returning to the magazine instead of just being there long enough to get the information that is needed.

post #14 of 33

Cracked was once a magazine. Just sayin. It all depends on how well the Newsweek team adapts.

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post #15 of 33
That's funny!

Nobody questioned their falling circulation. I think it is their blatant left leaning bias that turns off many readers.

Moving to the digital will not help as long as they stay biased.

I think Time and NY Times will follow this path for the same reason :-)

Die Walkure
post #16 of 33

It's hard for weekly print magazines to compete with free, real-time news.

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post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The rising cost of print has forced Newsweek to go digital-only starting in 2013, leaving its iPad app as one of the few ways to read the nearly 80-year-old publication.

riiiiight ... the rising cost of print ...
post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

It's hard for weekly print magazines to compete with free, real-time news.

 

I think you could say that about most magazines.  By the time they get to press it's old news. Even something like the TV guide needs to get with the digital age. It would probably be cake for them to go create a TV Guide Features that is either a paid section of their site/app or a magazine using a layout Entertainment Weekly does and still be able to fold in some video clips etc. Many magazines could go that sort of way. Even perhaps being able to split up issues into smaller bits. Make each major section it's own 'magazine' so say someone that reads Newsweek for the cover features can get that and ignore the book reviews that they never read. 

post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieWalkure View Post

That's funny!
Nobody questioned their falling circulation. I think it is their blatant left leaning bias that turns off many readers.
Moving to the digital will not help as long as they stay biased.
I think Time and NY Times will follow this path for the same reason :-)
Die Walkure

Just for clarification ... is your logic therefore that the red states buy more right wing newspapers or they don't have or know how to use modern technology?
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post #20 of 33

I only read one magazine regularly and it's only available in the proprietary Zinio format. I resisted subscribing digitally for at least a year because of that, until I finally caved in. But I hate the idea that if the app goes away in a few years, all the back issues I paid for will go with it.

 

Similarly with books, I would be much more likely to buy if they used a standard format. I currently have some books in iBooks and some in Kindle, the one magazine in Zinio, plus library books in Overdrive, none of which are compatible with each other. I would really prefer to be able to choose what app I use, and move my content between apps freely, like I can on the music side with MP3s. It doesn't make sense to use four different apps to read content.

 

So, similar to a couple posts above, more openness in formats would speed adoption for me.

post #21 of 33
I think Zinio%u2019s implementation of the e-mag concept is much better than Newsstand. The ability to zoom in and out of any page and the Text-only mode makes it way easier than Newsstand and even a printed magazine to read. Wonder why Newsstand doesn%u2019t allow its reader to pinch and zoom.
post #22 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Just for clarification ... is your logic therefore that the red states buy more right wing newspapers or they don't have or know how to use modern technology?

 

Just for clarification ... is your logic therefore that you agree that the NYTimes and Time mag are left-wing rags (with plummeting readership and declining revenue)?

post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

Not really. Newsweek is dying (circulation down about 65% over the past 10 years!) This is a last ditch effort for them.

 

That said, I agree print will eventually go all or mostly digital. But Newsweek is not the standard to judge by here.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DieWalkure View Post

That's funny!
Nobody questioned their falling circulation. I think it is their blatant left leaning bias that turns off many readers.
Moving to the digital will not help as long as they stay biased.
I think Time and NY Times will follow this path for the same reason :-)
Die Walkure


Back in pre-internet days when I had time to get bored, I once went through every page - make that every word - of an issue of "News"week with a pen doing my best to fairly rate what was "news" and what was opinion (of any stripe).  I found that at best 15% was strictly factual (and not always fully vetted) information of any kind, while 85% was slant, take and spin. And of course, nearly all in the leftish direction.

When I read the Times today (because it does have material few others do at times, AND just to keep track of what today's talking points are going to be in the rest of the "mainstream media" and for the DNC and Dem politicians themselves, who seem to get their walking papers there, labeled the "Hallelujah Chorus" by one conservative wag some decades back, am amazed at the total bleed-through between the "paper of record's" "news" and "editorial" divisions - and not only in what they deem to publish and the spin, but also significantly in what they don't publish at all or bury on page 23.  Though one can make the same complaint about most news publications, including those on the right.

If there ever was "objective journalism," it's become another lost art.  In today's business models, nearly every news outlet seems to be taking sides, making reading or watching the news an exercise in reifying one's existing values and beliefs. I read the Washington Post, which is liberal overall, but does a much better job of maintaining a firewall between its news and op-ed divisions than the Times, and the most objective paper/website I know of is the Christian Science Monitor (which has few if any ties to being "Christian" or Christian Scientist in its modern incarnation, btw).

However, once the traditional publishing outlets either fully adapt or die, the survivors will find their niches on the net (tho' lest any get complacent, the nature of that beast is not static either, or people would still be making graphical messes on MySpace - and the Cloud itself, could be superceded by technologies still not even invented, though it will more likely gradually morph and incorporate those).  And as for the net itself, in the US at least, in my totality of surfing, random and otherwise, my unscientific take (as someone "center right" on economic and geo-political matters, with libertarian and other quirky leanings) also seems to skew overall a bit to the left of the populace as a whole. Not to mention, also into many utterly banal and bizarre spaces, and with more (d'ohh, surprise) of a focus on matters of tech.

Whatever, the world's going where it's going.  And while my gen may be the last that HAS to experience the ravages of aging in less than a hundred or many more years, some days I'm not overly sad that I'm getting old....


Edited by bigpics - 10/18/12 at 10:31am

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post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

It's hard for weekly print magazines to compete with free, real-time news.

 

Weekly / monthly publications are where "traditional journalism" may (or may not) have an edge.

Longer-form in-depth reporting and analysis after the initial headline news.  

 

But we're living in the age of TL;DR.  I wonder how many of us get past the first 1000 words of any story.

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post #25 of 33

Bummer. I guess that is one magazine I won't be able to read at my dentist office or in line at the supermarket.

post #26 of 33
jd_in_sb View Post

It's hard for weekly print magazines to compete with free, real-time news.

I'd like to think there will always be a market for content that's a little more researched, methodical, and big-picture.

 

charlituna View Post
Even something like the TV guide needs to get with the digital age. It would probably be cake for them to go create a TV Guide Features that is either a paid section of their site/app or a magazine using a layout Entertainment Weekly does and still be able to fold in some video clips etc.

Perhaps there's a smaller overlap of people who watch traditional cable/broadcast TV, and people who are with the digital age. They already have a tv listings app.

Not to be too hyperbolic, but a digital version of TV guide features is like having a state-of-the-art iOS app for ham radio listeners.

Bring on the flaming from radio operators and users armed with Nielsen statistics from Two and a Half Men.

 

digitalclips View Post
Just for clarification ... is your logic therefore that the red states buy more right wing newspapers or they don't have or know how to use modern technology?

I agree with both of those statements.

 

MacChelsea View Post
I think Zinio's implementation of the e-mag concept is much better than Newsstand. The ability to zoom in and out of any page and the Text-only mode makes it way easier than Newsstand and even a printed magazine to read. Wonder why Newsstand doesn't allow its reader to pinch and zoom.

That ability depends on each magazine creator. Newsstand is more of a seperate storefront, not a content display engine.

 

pt123 View Post
Bummer. I guess that is one magazine I won't be able to read at my dentist office or in line at the supermarket.

You don't have an iOS device with you at those times?

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post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by maloderous View Post

Just for clarification ... is your logic therefore that you agree that the NYTimes and Time mag are left-wing rags (with plummeting readership and declining revenue)?

My logic is that it is progress just as we went from clay to papyrus. I made no politically slanted interpretation as did DieWalkure in his comment to which I replied, I simply tried to show his comment as silly.
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post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post



Back in pre-internet days when I had time to get bored, I once went through every page - make that every word - of an issue of "News"week with a pen doing my best to fairly rate what was "news" and what was opinion (of any stripe).  I found that at best 15% was strictly factual (and not always fully vetted) information of any kind, while 85% was slant, take and spin. And of course, nearly all in the leftish direction.


When I read the Times today (because it does have material few others do at times, AND just to keep track of what today's talking points are going to be in the rest of the "mainstream media" and for the DNC and Dem politicians themselves, who seem to get their walking papers there, labeled the "Hallelujah Chorus" by one conservative wag some decades back, am amazed at the total bleed-through between the "paper of record's" "news" and "editorial" divisions - and not only in what they deem to publish and the spin, but also significantly in what they don't publish at all or bury on page 23.  Though one can make the same complaint about most news publications, including those on the right.


If there ever was "objective journalism," it's become another lost art.  In today's business models, nearly every news outlet seems to be taking sides, making reading or watching the news an exercise in reifying one's existing values and beliefs. I read the Washington Post, which is liberal overall, but does a much better job of maintaining a firewall between its news and op-ed divisions than the Times, and the most objective paper/website I know of is the Christian Science Monitor (which has few if any ties to being "Christian" or Christian Scientist in its modern incarnation, btw).


However, once the traditional publishing outlets either fully adapt or die, the survivors will find their niches on the net (tho' lest any get complacent, the nature of that beast is not static either, or people would still be making graphical messes on MySpace - and the Cloud itself, could be superceded by technologies still not even invented, though it will more likely gradually morph and incorporate those).  And as for the net itself, in the US at least, in my totality of surfing, random and otherwise, my unscientific take (as someone "center right" on economic and geo-political matters, with libertarian and other quirky leanings) also seems to skew overall a bit to the left of the populace as a whole. Not to mention, also into many utterly banal and bizarre spaces, and with more (d'ohh, surprise) of a focus on matters of tech.


Whatever, the world's going where it's going.  And while my gen may be the last that HAS to experience the ravages of aging in less than a hundred or many more years, some days I'm not overly sad that I'm getting old....

I have found it best to get US news via the BBC in recent years for all of the above reasons. As an ex Brit and therefore not entrenched in any established dogma here (even though I've been here 22 years) I simply can't stand the news any more. There is little if any real news here these days that isn't spun. Then the other trend is toward sensationalism and this being AI, a good example of that is anything perceived being wrong with anything Apple makes (true or not) is front page news. Click bait at its worst.
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post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacChelsea View Post

I think Zinio%u2019s implementation of the e-mag concept is much better than Newsstand. The ability to zoom in and out of any page and the Text-only mode makes it way easier than Newsstand and even a printed magazine to read. Wonder why Newsstand doesn%u2019t allow its reader to pinch and zoom.

What are you talking about? I pinched and zoomed all day.
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorsos View Post

My biggest problem with iOS magazines is the implementation. Things are cool on Apple's end, but the publications themselves are enormous! I understand there are hardcore egos in the graphic layout biz, who demand a pixel-perfect recreation of their print pages, but I don't always have the bandwidth or storage space for 0.5 GB per issue.

 

Marco Arment's new magazine is how to properly make iOS publications. My hope is that since Newsweek is going entirely digital, they will no longer be held to the demands of print layout, and can provide accessible issues.

For what it's worth, I seem to recall that a lot of the problems magazines have in reproducing their look on an iPad/whatever is font licensing issues. They don't have the rights to reproduce their fonts of choice in digital format, leading them to the VERY unwieldy image-per-page versions that are prevalent now (looking at YOU, PixelMags!)

post #31 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorsos View Post
You don't have an iOS device with you at those times?

 

iDevice means magazine is not free and bringing an iPad along while shopping might result in iPad being dropped which leads back to the no longer available paper magazine


Edited by pt123 - 10/18/12 at 2:17pm
post #32 of 33

Other type of magazines (NatGeo, AD etc.) that usually publish articles with so many big size, high quality photos, with the inevitable need of being high res. pictures for the retina display, will eat the storage of your device quickly and that will remain a serious problem for a while.
On the other hand, newspapers on paper should really move to digital but I'm not sure how a newspaper app can compete with real-time, up-to-date websites (I don't mean every news site is inherently up-to-date though).
What the internet is taking on so far is the type of press that is said to offer the "quick", daily/weekly issues, news, comments, critics. Unfortunately, journalists are being replaced by bloggers that are mostly laymen and don't have to respect anyone or anything...

I believe the apps on tablets, smartphones are the future, however, there are still some issues with it.
For example, you could find more than one edition of a magazine (or more copies from the same, or even thinking about different magazines) at your dentist's, hairdresser's etc. waiting room that can be read by more than one person in the same time but on digital you need to provide so many devices for use. Doesn't matter you have a tablet/smartphone with you 'cause can't just access to that app from the dentist's tablet on yours. You with him won't have shared account, will you?

You can share digital material but only with your own devices, not with others.


Edited by mac-user - 10/18/12 at 4:24pm
post #33 of 33

It doesn't surprise me that they are ceasing the print edition. I was a Newsweek subscriber (print edition) for years. It used to be one of the best news magazines available. Things went downhill fast once they were sold and merged with The Daily Beast. It floundered significantly while they figured out exactly what they were going to do with the magazine. It was like the walking dead. It went from a robust magazine with great stories to something like a freebie news pamphlet. Whole sections were nothing more than full pages of a photo with a paragraph of actual copy. I finally let my subscription lapse. They practically begged me to renew my subscription. In fact, for a few months AFTER my subscription ended, I kept receiving the magazine. Just recently it stopped. I wondered why, but now I know. As bad as the magazine was, I can't imagine it will do significantly better in a digital only version. My guess is that it will die out...which is very sad. As for The Daily Beast...meh. It's a so so news site.

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