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Revamped new iTunes 11 user interface hints at future of OS X

post #1 of 70
Thread Starter 
Apple's upcoming new release of iTunes 11, due by the end of October (and likely to launch with the iPad mini), suggests several new user interface concepts that are likely to also be adopted its larger OS X platform.

Over the past five years, Apple has introduced a wide variety of new iOS features that have percolated their way "back to the Mac," as well as having introduced OS X features that have later shown up in its mobile devices. However, Apple's own first party apps, and in particular iTunes, have also served as harbingers of new user interface directions.

Apple has experimented extensively with user interface concepts in its iTunes, Safari, iLife, iWork and other apps, with mixed success. Two years ago, iTunes 10 debuted with a space-efficient, vertical stack of Close/Dock/Zoom buttons (shown below), an idea that didn't last long (outside of the mini player, shown below).

S101_MiniPlayerPlay.png


This year's new iTunes 11 release, however, boldly remakes the entire app, rethinking a series of features that have piled up within iTunes since it was first released by Apple in 2001.

iTunes piles up the features



The original iTunes was almost purely a music library management app, and slowly began to gain new features ranging from device support for the new iPod and for CD burning in iTunes 2, then smart playlists, ratings and Audible audiobooks in iTunes 3.

iTunes 4 introduced the first integrated Music Store with podcasts and support for AirTunes (now AirPlay) wireless distribution, and its overall look (but not really its user interface) was updated for iTunes 5 in 2005.

5 Years of iPod


Since then, Apple has loaded up on content features, adding TV and music videos in iTunes 6, full length movies, iTunes U podcasts and iPod games in 2007's iTunes 7, and iOS Apps (along with Genius features, HD video and rentals) in iTunes 8.

5 Years of iPod


Apple revamped its integrated music, video, audiobooks and apps store to be WebKit-based in iTunes 9, and experimented with TV rentals and Ping social sharing in iTunes 10, both of which failed to find traction along with the aforementioned new vertical window controls.

5 Years of iPod


Rethinking iTunes, with iOS in mind



For the first time, Apple is overhauling iTunes's overloaded user interface in version 11. The most obvious departure is the elimination of the Source List sidebar, which has for the last decade defined the iTunes user interface. Apple has used a similar sidebar in OS X's Finder, as well as other iLife apps, including iPhoto and the discontinued iWeb.

Unlike the Finder, you can't hide iTunes' current Source List sidebar. Instead, you can only show or hide iTunes' Genius recommendations that appear in a second sidebar on the right. The primary iTunes Source List sidebar includes Library items (including local music, movies, books and apps), separately lists Store-related content (the store itself, iTunes Match, and Purchased items available "in the cloud"), attached Devices, and Playlists (regular, Smart, and Genius mixes).

During the launch event showcasing iPhone 5 and new iPods, Apple's iTunes head Eddie Cue outlined why this was changing. Two thirds of iTunes downloads are now originating on iOS devices, he noted, prompting Apple to focus on redesigning its iTunes, iBook and App Store for iOS, "making them more fun and easier to use." While he didn't expressly state it, OS X sidebars are not really multitouch friendly, having been originally designed for the much more accurate targeting of a mouse-driven pointer.

Stores


Cue outlined the new design for iOS store apps (across music, movies, TV, books, and apps, pictured above), which are now outfitted with large promotional banners at the top and swipeable lists of available content below, with a heavy focus on album art rather than textual menus.

Cue also promoted the iOS stores' improved performance, search result and new integration with Facebook and Twitter (replacing Apple's own Ping for social promotion of iTunes content; artist pages and photos from Ping remain, although without the "Ping" branding). This results in a cohesive store experience across the desktop, iPad and iPhone version of iTunes.

iTunes 11



Integrating iCloud & Stores into your iTunes library



Transitioning to the desktop version of iTunes, Cue noted that new new version would be "dramatically simpler, and we've built iCloud right in," rather than being tacked on as a Sidebar item separate from the Library. Instead of managing your local files and your available downloads from iCloud in separate bins, you see all your content together, whether it's saved locally or not, similar to how iOS 6 now manages apps. To download iCloud content, you just click on the cloud icon.

In doing away with the Source List, Apple is now providing a consistent menu bar interface (borrowed from the original iTunes Store) for perusing your content, whether its local or stored in iCloud. It's the same multitouch-friendly interface used in the new iOS iTunes, iBooks and App Store apps.

iTunes 11 iCloud


Also built right in: Apple's iTunes Store. Instead of continuing as a textual database listing of your local content, iTunes 11 shows off your local music albums as icons full of songs, even using the iOS Folders user interface to represent the songs within in album (or the credits within a movie). Click a button, and Apple looks up Store content related to what you own, blurring the line between your content and the content that's available in the iTunes Store.

iTunes 11 integrated store content


Also new: playlists. Rather than being constantly visible from the Source List, Apple handles these collections similar to iOS Folders as well, poping up a listing of your playlists whenever you drag content to provide potential targets. This provides the functional equivalent of the old Source List without dedicating a broad sidebar of the app to showing it all the time.

Apart from this selection feature, Playlists now appear only when you select them in iTunes' menu bar. To add songs to a playlist, you click the Add button and pick songs from your library, then click done.

iTunes 11 integrated store content

iTunes 11 integrated store content



New iOS conventions in iTunes



In addition to its touch-friendly navigation menubar and its "iOS Folders" style representation of details within a collection (such as an album or movie), iTunes also borrows two other iOS ideas: Spotlight-style smart search (similar to Safari's integrated search, presenting a live cascade of results) and two timeline based features: "up next" (showing an editable list of songs about to play) and "history" (songs that have played), two new popup menus similar to Notification Center (they even use the same icon).

iTunes 11 up next

iTunes 11 play history


It's reasonable to think that Apple is likely to recycle some of these evolutions of the interface in OS X, in particular the Finder which shares iTunes' sidebar-orientation as well as its somewhat confusing mix of local and cloud based content.

A Finder focused on search and clean presentation could similarly provide an alternative, "iTunes 11 style" view of the file system that focused on your content, rather than the structure of the file system or the actual location of your documents.

It could also seamlessly integrate iCloud documents with local files, showing each iCloud-registered app library of your documents. This would clarify iCloud's app-centric document storage, a feature that is currently confusing to some users.

Rethinking iTunes' titlebar



Apple's presentation of iTunes 11 also highlighted several other changes to the user interface. Once again, there's now no title bar dedicated to labeling the window as being "iTunes." This was dropped in iTunes 10 two years ago, but reverted along with several other concepts.

This time around, the change is more likely to stick. Since iTunes 10, Apple has also launched the Mac App Store app without a title bar. In a sense, iTunes now has an extended titlebar played by its "virtual LCD panel" display of what's playing. This is what currently shows up in Full Screen mode, and there's no real reason for iTunes to dedicate an entire line of the tool bar just to declare itself.

The title bar still makes sense for document-centric apps (including the Finder, where it plays a navigational role), but for other apps that don't need it, the title bar convention is increasingly likely to be dropped, just as window scroll bars with fixed gutters disappeared in OS X 10.7 Lion.

Rethinking iTunes' window controls



Another element of the iTunes menu bar now in flux: the new Minimize icon next to the Full Screen control. These are slightly odd, because they seeming replicate portions of the standard Close/Dock/Zoom buttons.

Historically, Apple originally presented a Close box and Zoom button (that optimized the size of the window) on the Macintosh. Microsoft's Windows, on the other hand, presented Close, Minimize and Maximize buttons.

At the launch of OS X, Apple added a Dock button that effectively worked similar to Windows' minimize button for shrinking the window out of view (and replacing the "Windowshade" button that reduced a window down to its title bar, but left that visible and in place on the screen). Apple's Zoom never quite duplicated the "take full screen" intention of Windows' Maximize button, a convention mimicking the full screen text modes of MS-DOS.

After releasing the window-free iPad, Apple introduced its own Full Screen mode for OS X, but rather than simply maximizing the window, Apple hid the menu bar and removed the window controls entirely, putting a bit more "max" into its maximizing of the window's content.

Thus, Apple now has three old window controls, and two new ones in iTunes 11, with some overlap (the green zoom button in iTunes 11 is effectively the same as the new Mini Player button). Additionally, in the iTunes 11 mini player, Apple presents a new type of "standard" controls: a grey "X" to close and an grey "O" to zoom (resume normal size).

Mac window controls


This indicates Apple may finally get rid of the bright "gumdrop" Aqua window buttons at some point in the future of OS X (they currently have no analog in the windowless iOS), and replace them with "iTunes 11 mini player" style close and open controls that match the new Full Screen buttons that appeared in OS X 10.7 Lion: subtle, simple, grey icons. A variety of monochrome X icons are already used throughout OS X in place of the old Aqua red dot.

iTunes 11 isn't the only app hinting at Apple's future user interface directions as will be expanded upon later. But it does serve as one of the company's most popular places to experiment with user interface ideas. iTunes 11 will likely ship next week, although Apple has only stated that it will launch by the end of October.
post #2 of 70

I really think this should be invisible, like their hardware notification lights.

 

 

Standard recessed-looking Apple logo in the center, slightly lighter, no differentiation from the surrounding bar. When information is there, have it appear. When not, not. We don't need a big box up top to show that. 

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #3 of 70
Another 20,000 word count mini-novel from DED... Maybe he should just become a full time fan-fiction writer. 1biggrin.gif

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GOA

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post #4 of 70
I suspect this will get released the day of the iPad mini event, at least as a beta.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #5 of 70

I hope that they change their iCloud/iTunes Match back to the way it was on iOS.

 

I want the option to either stream or download an individual tune, and also the option to delete an individual tune, I don't think that that's asking for too much.

post #6 of 70
"I want the option to either stream or download an individual tune, and also the option to delete an individual tune, I don't think that that's asking for too much.
"

YES !

"Another 20,000 word count mini-novel from DED... Maybe he should just become a full time fan-fiction writer. 1biggrin.gif"

they are the best articles : interesting and bold.
post #7 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/153598/revamped-new-itunes-11-user-interface-hints-at-future-of-os-x#post_2215638"]I hope that they change their iCloud/iTunes Match back to the way it was on iOS.

I want the option to either stream or download an individual tune, and also the option to delete an individual tune, I don't think that that's asking for too much.

I just bought iTunes Match when I switched from the 64GB to 16GB iPhone 5. Since I really only listen to music on the go I had assumed that I could see all the pointless tracks in my Music library as greyed out and then DL or delete them as needed. It turns out that's not possible so, if I'm on WiFi, I'll have to DL a track I dislike (not hard because it seems to want to DL all tracks by an artist when I only want one) and then rate them as 1 start so I can then later delete from iTunes Library on my Mac. That seems like a huge work around to deal with my library. Hopefully someone has a better way.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #8 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Hopefully someone has a better way.

Apple had a better way, but somebody there decided to go and change it.

 

I've read a ton of complaints about this issue, so I'm fairly certain that Apple is aware of the blunder which they made, and I can only hope that they fix it sometime in the near future.

post #9 of 70
The moment iTunes for Mac mimics the horrendous iPad Music app is the moment I will stop upgrading to its latest version - and it's more than clear that iTunes 11 is that version.

The pathetic trend towards using iOS metaphors into OS X continues unabated - guys, anyone with an extensive library does NOT want to navigate through album pictures; the traditional list view MUST remain there, unchanged.

And what's all this hoopla about eliminating the source sidebar? Where are we gonna find the same elements, then? It definitely seems like it's time for Forstall to get out of Apple...bring Tevanian and Serlet back, please!
iMac Intel 27" Core i7 3.4, 16GB RAM, 120GB SSD + 1TB HD + 4TB RAID 1+0, Nuforce Icon HDP, OS X 10.9.1; iPad Air 64GB; iPhone 5 32GB; iPod Classic; iPod Nano 4G; Apple TV 2.
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post #10 of 70
Quote:
The title bar still makes sense for document-centric apps (including the Finder, where it plays a navigational role), but for other apps that don't need it, the title bar convention is increasingly likely to be dropped, just as window scroll bars with fixed gutters disappeared in OS X 10.7 Lion.

There are other functions the title bar serves, such as providing a suitably large target for moving the window. Less necessary with unified toolbars, of course, but in apps like Safari where the toolbar has lots of other clickable targets it is crucial (as we saw with the attempt to introduce tabs-on-top).

I hope we will still be able to disable the ridiculous levels of iTunes Store integration that serves little purpose for the user.
post #11 of 70
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post
The pathetic trend towards using iOS metaphors into OS X continues unabated…

 

Holy cow. It's just like 1984 all over again. How horrible.

 

…the traditional list view MUST remain there, unchanged.

 

No.

 

And what's all this hoopla about eliminating the source sidebar? Where are we gonna find the same elements, then? 
 

Are you looking at the images of it?


It definitely seems like it's time for Forstall to get out of Apple...bring Tevanian and Serlet back, please!

 

It definitely seems like it's time for you to stop making things up.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #12 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I just bought iTunes Match when I switched from the 64GB to 16GB iPhone 5. Since I really only listen to music on the go I had assumed that I could see all the pointless tracks in my Music library as greyed out and then DL or delete them as needed. It turns out that's not possible so, if I'm on WiFi, I'll have to DL a track I dislike (not hard because it seems to want to DL all tracks by an artist when I only want one) and then rate them as 1 start so I can then later delete from iTunes Library on my Mac. That seems like a huge work around to deal with my library. Hopefully someone has a better way.

 

This is part of why I'm not at all a fan of the cloud model and prefer to have lots of local storage. Listening "on the go" means I almost never have WiFi access when I want to listen.

 

I also DON'T want my devices to "help" me manage my content. Apple's deliberate efforts to obfuscate file systems are becoming increasingly frustrating to those who use the Mac for more than a media consumption device.

post #13 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Another 20,000 word count mini-novel from DED... Maybe he should just become a full time fan-fiction writer. 1biggrin.gif

 

I enjoyed the history lesson. Not to mention seeing some old title bars I hadn't seen in a very long time. I remember how "good lookin'" some seemed when they were first introduced. Thanks to the writer for this article. 

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #14 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I just bought iTunes Match when I switched from the 64GB to 16GB iPhone 5. Since I really only listen to music on the go I had assumed that I could see all the pointless tracks in my Music library as greyed out and then DL or delete them as needed. It turns out that's not possible so, if I'm on WiFi, I'll have to DL a track I dislike (not hard because it seems to want to DL all tracks by an artist when I only want one) and then rate them as 1 start so I can then later delete from iTunes Library on my Mac. That seems like a huge work around to deal with my library. Hopefully someone has a better way.

 

Can you make up playlists and download a specific playlist to your iPhone??

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #15 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post

[...] anyone with an extensive library does NOT want to navigate through album pictures;

 

I don't even get why Apple (and the music industry as a whole) clings so desperately to the "album" model. My interest is in the individual track. Who CARES which album the song came from? The beauty of the a la carte system brought about by iTunes is the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff -- no more buying a whole album just to get a particular track or two. Many pop artists are now releasing their works as singles, not waiting to release complete albums. The whole notion just seems like clinging to an outdated concept.

 

Building an update to iTunes around an album-centric model *seems* (without having tried it yet) like putting an additional, unnecessary layer between me and what I'm after, which is a particular track.

 

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post

[...] the traditional list view MUST remain there, unchanged.

 

I don't know if I'd insist on "unchanged" but a way to quickly access individual tracks without pointless fluff is important to my daily use of at least one of the Macs I use every day.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No.

 

Why not? Why would you object to an interface that puts function over frilly window dressing? Particularly if it's an "option?"


Edited by v5v - 10/21/12 at 10:08am
post #16 of 70
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

Why not? Why would you object to an interface that puts function over frilly window dressing? Particularly if it's an "option?"

 

My objection's more to the "must… …unchanged" bit. No problem leaving it in, problem demanding it left in if better options are available.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #17 of 70

Hopefully the windows version still runs on XP to save me having to update my wife... I prefer to wait for haswell.

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post #18 of 70

I think I'll first test out the new version of itunes on my non-music computer to see if it's workable for my main computer that has my itunes library. My itunes library has a little under 25000 tracks, around 1500 artists, and about 2800 albums, so some giant grid view with album artwork is not going to be workable for me at all. As boring as it is, a giant library needs text lists in some form or another to remain usable. If the source list on the left is somewhat replaced by some buttons at the top, that'll probably be ok. If it proves unworkable for my large library, I guess I'll be holding off on updating for as long as possible, until I have no choice but to update in order to use some piece of future hardware, like a new phone or ipod or whatever comes up that I'm interested in. The whole thing is bit irritating though, because it feels like trying to fix something that's not broken, just to serve a larger agenda of converging UI elements within ios and osx. I don't care much about that larger goal to be honest, I just want to use itunes the way I want to use it.

post #19 of 70

Originally Posted by jonyo View Post
As boring as it is, a giant library needs text lists in some form or another to remain usable.

 

Why?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #20 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

This is part of why I'm not at all a fan of the cloud model and prefer to have lots of local storage. Listening "on the go" means I almost never have WiFi access when I want to listen.

I also DON'T want my devices to "help" me manage my content. Apple's deliberate efforts to obfuscate file systems are becoming increasingly frustrating to those who use the Mac for more than a media consumption device.

1) Nothing you stated is what I described. iTunes Match doesn't mean you can't have your tracks on your device. I wanted a certain usage so I could perform a certain task. It's my fault for not understanding the tech properly before I bought it but it was only $25 so I'm not going to lose sleep over it.

2) You don't want the device to help you manage your content? How the hell will you organize your music? You want Finder for iPhone and then play tracks one at a time?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Can you make up playlists and download a specific playlist to your iPhone??

You can but I assume the only playlists you can make on the device will contain tracks that are already DLed, which puts me back in the same situation.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #21 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonyo View Post

I think I'll first test out the new version of itunes on my non-music computer to see if it's workable for my main computer that has my itunes library. My itunes library has a little under 25000 tracks, around 1500 artists, and about 2800 albums, so some giant grid view with album artwork is not going to be workable for me at all. As boring as it is, a giant library needs text lists in some form or another to remain usable. If the source list on the left is somewhat replaced by some buttons at the top, that'll probably be ok. If it proves unworkable for my large library, I guess I'll be holding off on updating for as long as possible, until I have no choice but to update in order to use some piece of future hardware, like a new phone or ipod or whatever comes up that I'm interested in. The whole thing is bit irritating though, because it feels like trying to fix something that's not broken, just to serve a larger agenda of converging UI elements within ios and osx. I don't care much about that larger goal to be honest, I just want to use itunes the way I want to use it.

iTunes 11 does not lose its song listings for an album only display. You can see in the above Playlist screenshots from the iPhone 5 event that you can also browse by Song, which presents the historical view, just without a sidebar. So you get more of it, not less.

What's broken and being fixed is the overlapping role of the sidebar (music movies tv podcasts etc) and the top menu bar of stores (music movies tv podcasts etc) which is confusing. Now there is one ui bar. It's not a goal of convergence as much as improvement.
post #22 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

Hopefully the windows version still runs on XP to save me having to update my wife... I prefer to wait for haswell.

I'm guessing that there won't be a WinXP version. I'm thinking WIn7 will be the oldest version it officially supports going forward.

Perhaps I'm way off base here since there are still a lot of XP machines but I think if they were just on the older version of iTunes Apple wouldn't care.... Or maybe they would because keeping people comfortable with XP means they won't moving to Win8 and when they do it could be "shell shock" for them which could encourage a Mac sale.

Then there is the issue with Windows RT requiring apps go through MS's appstore which I don't see Apple doing for iTunes, at least not until Windows RT is a roaring success thus forcing their hand.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #23 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Nothing you stated is what I described.

 

I know. I figured you had already made your point and I followed up with my own.

post #24 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

I know. I figured you had already made your point and I followed up with my own.

Ah, then mea culpa.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #25 of 70
All I want are the colored icons back. Why did they ever go to monochrome is beyond me.
post #26 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You can but I assume the only playlists you can make on the device will contain tracks that are already DLed, which puts me back in the same situation.

 

No, you can go into playlists on iOS, make a new playlist, add the songs you want, and then download that playlist which you just created. I did it on the Apple Music app on my iPad last week, and it worked.

post #27 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/153598/revamped-new-itunes-11-user-interface-hints-at-future-of-os-x#post_2215783"]
No, you can go into playlists on iOS, make a new playlist, add the songs you want, and then download that playlist which you just created. I did it on the Apple Music app on my iPad last week, and it worked.

If I can add un-downloaded songs to a Playlist that might be the best way to start quarantining tracks I want to delete from the iCloud DB in the future. I've already removed everything from my iTunes Library on my Mac. Starting anew. I'm guessing I'll have a few hundred songs remaining when all is said and done.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #28 of 70
I think, at least on the Mac, they should go way iOS inspired. Separate the iTunes Store, Audio player and Video player into separate apps. Create a new podcast app as well. Even perhaps a separate app and iBooks store. Or just use the web. They have that iTunes preview website. Just make that the store.

In the apps show everything that is local, shared, available to download in one flat list with user options to download, stream etc. like you can do when you have Match or if you have TV shows in the iOS 6 video app and so on.

Then for importing, syncing etc just have the disk or device show up in the finder and have all appropriate checkboxes etc there.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #29 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Why?

 

the answer to your question was at the end

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by jonyo View Post

I don't care much about that larger goal to be honest, I just want to use itunes the way I want to use it.

 

 

Frankly I think it's time for someone to look for something other than iTunes to use. 

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #30 of 70
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post
the answer to your question was at the end

 

Ah, I see. Thanks. Never mind that a list of text is a worse way to use it, never mind that the search can and will find anything he can possibly be wanting…

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #31 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


If I can add un-downloaded songs to a Playlist that might be the best way to start quarantining tracks I want to delete from the iCloud DB in the future. I've already removed everything from my iTunes Library on my Mac. Starting anew. I'm guessing I'll have a few hundred songs remaining when all is said and done.

 

I also found out that it is possible to download just one individual song, you have to make a playlist, add just that one song, and then download the playlist. It works, though the method for getting there is frankly speaking quite retarded and most cumbersome. Previously, the same operation took just one click.

 

I still do not know of any way to delete an individual song from an iOS device. You can wipe the entire library from your device, but that's not exactly useful.

post #32 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][
I still do not know of any way to delete an individual song from an iOS device. You can wipe the entire library from your device, but that's not exactly useful.

On my iPhone 4S I just swipe from the right to the left and a 'Delete' button appears.
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post #33 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mobius View Post

On my iPhone 4S I just swipe from the right to the left and a 'Delete' button appears.

I just tried that. I can only get it to work for songs not using iTunes Match.

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post #34 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I just tried that. I can only get it to work for songs not using iTunes Match.

Yes, in the previous version of iTunes Match, that's how it worked, but sadly, not anymore.

post #35 of 70
The great thing about the original iPhone was that, although it was OSX under the hood, it didn't try to mimic desktop paradigms. I'm sure that it was a conscious decision on Apple's part so why try to mimic mobile paradigms on the desktop now?

I agree with charlituna though, the App Store should be a separate app.
post #36 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

I don't even get why Apple (and the music industry as a whole) clings so desperately to the "album" model. My interest is in the individual track. Who CARES which album the song came from? The beauty of the a la carte system brought about by iTunes is the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff -- no more buying a whole album just to get a particular track or two. Many pop artists are now releasing their works as singles, not waiting to release complete albums. The whole notion just seems like clinging to an outdated notion.

 

Building an update to iTunes around an album-centric model *seems* (without having tried it yet) like putting an additional, unnecessary layer between me and what I'm after, which is a particular track.

You should have that option in iTunes, BUT - I would never use it that way. I buy albums (CDs mostly), and I listen to albums (not individual songs). You can infer that my tastes in music do NOT include most modern popular music (for that, albums mostly aren't important, with some exceptions like the Decemberists). But there's a lot of music that only makes sense in albums, and those of us who are album-centric (there are a lot of us) should have that option as well. Is that so terrible? Or do you think the world should be run just for your tastes?

 

I'm really frustrated about the changes in iTunes for OS X - I hope an app like "Enqueue" will step up and make improvements, so it could totally replace iTunes as a music player.


Edited by elroth - 10/21/12 at 3:31am
post #37 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I suspect this will get released the day of the iPad mini event, at least as a beta.

I don't recall Apple ever having an iTunes beta released. IIRC it's just...boom!
Quote:
Originally Posted by maclvr03 View Post

All I want are the colored icons back. Why did they ever go to monochrome is beyond me.

Same here. Which now has put my Aperture updates on hold as they removed colored icons in there as well. So I'm stuck @ 3.2.3 I understand I'll at some point need to upgrade anyhow, but sometimes putting off is worth the wait. Like Finders' Stack display, and with the .1 release they gave us the normal List view back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post

The pathetic trend towards using iOS metaphors into OS X continues unabated - guys, anyone with an extensive library does NOT want to navigate through album pictures; the traditional list view MUST remain there, unchanged.
Quote:

I agree, I can't believe they are actually removing the ol' school List View. Perhaps Cmd-Option-3 will work. Or Option-Click someplace; they have a tendency to do such things.
Quote:
Originally Posted by maclvr03 View Post

And what's all this hoopla about eliminating the source sidebar? Where are we gonna find the same elements, then?

Can anyone confirm this? I sure hope it's possible to retain v10 alongside for this reason as well. I tried to run Safari5 on 10.8 which has v6 installed, but the darn browser is so integrated with the OS v5 simply didn't work. Couldn't find a way to do so. I wanted this so I'd have the Activity Window back (for easy downloads of vids with a simply Copy and Paste it in the Downloads Window) but alas, looks like it's gone to stay. And the Web Inspector doesn't help me. But I digress.

edited to clean up the formatting, but I actually made it worse - sorry
post #38 of 70

This is update looks like it’s going to be a disaster for the 12~14 of us worldwide who listen to real music. In particular, I'm extremely worried about the fate of ‘browsing by composer.’ Apple has the class to accompany Steve’s yahrzeit video with Yo-Yo Ma’s well played Bach, but it took years to add browsing by composer to iTunes and iPods—now it appears we’re losing it again. 1mad.gif

post #39 of 70
The bigger issue here is feature creep - as pointed out in the article here, iTunes does more with each release than previous versions, with the potential to become a mini-OS all by itself if unrestrained, in the same way as the web browser did a few years back. This is fragmenting for Apple, because if iTunes does too much, then we won't need other parts of Mac OS. But we see Apple stopping this getting too much traction, for example, there's no technical reason why iTunes couldn't also handle pictures/video when one connects their iPhone, but no, Apple keeps iPhoto in existence for that, and stops iTunes from doing it. Ok, ok, iPhoto does way more too, I know. But the point is, maintenance of an ecosystem has pains for the user, eg the nuisance of grabbing pictures from an iPhone in iPhoto, but syncing songs via iTunes - better for the average user to do it all via one app, but not better for Apple. So, we can expect iTunes 11 do do a little more than 10, but not too much more.
post #40 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

[...] those of us who are album-centric (there are a lot of us) should have that option as well. Is that so terrible? Or do you think the world should be run just for your tastes?

 

I was basing my observations on the way I see my friends, family and co-workers using it. I don't know anyone for whom albums are a priority anymore. That doesn't mean they NEVER buy an album, just that it's the exception rather than the rule. It even seems like artists have, for the most part, ditched the "cohesive and linear album" concept. Again, there are obviously exceptions, but it doesn't seem to be the predominant delivery method anymore. The times, etc.

 

I do not begrudge you having the ability to manage your library by albums. In fact, I think the ability to sort according to just about any criterion like we can now is great. I just don't want to be FORCED into an album paradigm just so Apple can dumb down the Mac experience to more closely mirror iOS.

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