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Jony Ive's minimalist designs could reshape the future of iOS, OS X - Page 2

post #41 of 132

I'm really excited about this, much more so than the new products to be honest :)

post #42 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

I have a groovy feeling about this as well. It's going to create a lot of bitching and moaning, however, once things start to change. As forward thinking as a lot of Mac users are, sometimes small changes bring about great fury. I've read hundreds of posts regarding the thinner iMac. Many people don't understand why this is a valuable design concept.

 

Yeah, I fall into that camp. I admit to being a little nervous about what Ive might do with interface design because his direction in hardware, while aesthetically remarkable, is leaning towards form over function, sometimes sacrificing performance to achieve prettiness. Making things pretty is fine, but making tools less productive strikes me as a bad idea. In cases where the goals of performance and pretty conflict, I'd prefer the former be given priority.

 

And you're right, I do NOT understand why the thinner iMac is supposedly a "valuable design concept." I'd LIKE to, but I don't really understand the benefit. Can you explain it to me?

post #43 of 132
So does Ive actually have software people reporting to him now? The press release said he would "provide leadership and guidance" but it didn't say of any specific group would be reporting to him. I noticed on LinkedIn a lot of Apple HI/UI/UX employees have design degrees not software engineering degrees.
post #44 of 132
"Yes, yellow leather and 18 gauge thread (that's 120 for Europeans) wasn't the best idea."

To be honest, this doesn't bother me so much.

What does bother me is that they spent time doing this, rather than adding features or fixing bugs.

Consider iOS's Podcasts app. Nice reel-to-reel UI, which I'm sure took someone a long time to develop.

Sadly, they didn't spend that same amount of time making the app actually work. For instance, it periodically resets and claims that every single episode of some podcast has not been heard. It so utterly filled with bugs that it's useless.

Now I do believe looks are important. But they're not *everything*, and it seems that's all Apple has been doing. Perhaps that was Forestall, and if so, good riddance.
post #45 of 132

Great article.

 

I'm more than happy a design guy is now in charge of the two OS platforms (coming from a design background myself). I really do hope Apple look outside to see what third party devs are doing. The jailbreaking community have done some absolutely wonderful work, and shouldn't be ignored. Things like LockInfo, Winterboard and Siri tweaks are simplistic and productive tools. In OSX, things like Totalfinder and Mountain Tweaks bring real functionality to simple tasks. Now I only hope we can get rid of the cartoon graphics in iOS and OSX. PLEASE!!!

post #46 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I could really look forward to a future where UI design is driven by competition between Ive at Apple and the Metro team at Misrosoft.

(Although I think of Metro the way I think of the UIs on Star Trek: super cool, and the nerd in me loves them as much as the artist in me... but I’m not sure they have the instant intuitive usability that a mainstream product for NON-nerds should have. iOS comes really close in that regard—the best that has yet existed.)

+++

Ahh… The iOS UI.

I suspect that the iOS UI from the 2007 iPhone up to and including the 2011 iPad was mainly Steve Jobs doing...

As close to perfection, for a computing appliance, as the world has seen!

As the world moves forward with the convergence of desktop hardware/software with tablet hardware/software -- a further rethinking of the proper UI is needed.

IMO, the greatest single objective for hardware and software (both OS and Application) is to "get out of the way".
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post #47 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"There is a loyalty that I have for Apple and a belief that this company has an impact beyond design which feels important. I also have a sense of being accountable as we really live, sometimes pretty painfully with the consequences of what we do."
 

 

The above should have read "There is a loyalty I've for Apple..."!

 

OT, I just aquired an early 2006 Mac Mini running 10.4. I am having real fun playing around with it as this is the first time I have worked with Tiger! Fun to see how different it is from Win XP (which I was actually using in 2006). My entry point into Mac OS was Snow Leopard with my late 2009 27" iMac.

post #48 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

Yeah, I fall into that camp. I admit to being a little nervous about what Ive might do with interface design because his direction in hardware, while aesthetically remarkable, is leaning towards form over function, sometimes sacrificing performance to achieve prettiness. Making things pretty is fine, but making tools less productive strikes me as a bad idea. In cases where the goals of performance and pretty conflict, I'd prefer the former be given priority.

 

And you're right, I do NOT understand why the thinner iMac is supposedly a "valuable design concept." I'd LIKE to, but I don't really understand the benefit. Can you explain it to me?

If you read Steve Job biography, you would understand that design comes before function at Apple, and it works. Instead of the engineers telling the designers what needs to fit into a computer box, Steve told his hardware guys, "I want the computer to look like this. Make the components fit". To explain the benefit of streamlining the iMac design. Two things. It is considerably lighter (using less materials to make, keeping the price down) and secondly you mentioned it. Aesthetics. If it looks remarkable and feels remarkable, people will want it. Its bringing the future into your hands. The look, the feel and the ease of use make Apple products desirable. It isn't form over function. The function is more than there. Apple have never compromised function on any device. It takes a holistic approach to bring this together. Its not luck, or hope, its a real desire to bring what designers dream of, into your hands. If we left it to the hardware engineers, we'd still be using beige boxes. Don't look at what isn't there, look at what is.

post #49 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shameer Mulji View Post

As far as consumer and pro apps are concerned, with the exception of lingering iWork, I think the rest of the apps are pretty good.  Final Cut Pro X has grown to be a phenomenal product, despite the PR mess regarding its introduction.  Music lovers enjoy Logic Pro

I think some added capabilities and interface dressing up to iWork right now would pay off handsomely since the public is now getting to see MS Office RT all stripped down and with a half-arsed touch interface bolted on... Being on par with RT Word and RT Excel is a lot easier than it would have been if MS hadn't shipped a crippled RT version of Office.

I totally agree with this! The opportunity is now!

If Apple can figure out what the top 80 percent features that people need in word processing and spreadsheet, then incorporate them into iWork -- they've got a winner.

There is a good possibility that a revised iWork could be more compatible with desktop MS Office then the windows RT Office implementation.

Keynote has some interesting possibilities… It could be enhanced for storyboarding, application prototyping, or even an iWeb-class web site development system.
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post #50 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

I have a groovy feeling about this as well. It's going to create a lot of bitching and moaning, however, once things start to change. As forward thinking as a lot of Mac users are, sometimes small changes bring about great fury. I've read hundreds of posts regarding the thinner iMac. Many people don't understand why this is a valuable design concept.

Yeah, I fall into that camp. I admit to being a little nervous about what Ive might do with interface design because his direction in hardware, while aesthetically remarkable, is leaning towards form over function, sometimes sacrificing performance to achieve prettiness. Making things pretty is fine, but making tools less productive strikes me as a bad idea. In cases where the goals of performance and pretty conflict, I'd prefer the former be given priority.

And you're right, I do NOT understand why the thinner iMac is supposedly a "valuable design concept." I'd LIKE to, but I don't really understand the benefit. Can you explain it to me?

"Clothes make the man".
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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post #51 of 132

Expecting great things with Jony at the helm of Software as well as Hardware. Consistency, elegance, and ease of use. 

 

Looking at the article, I'm remembering how much I liked Platinum. 

post #52 of 132
"Apple's design future will also need to balance the extreme of sophisticated, minimalist, utilitarian design with the whimsical, rich and customizable options many users like. In that regard, Ive is more likely to favor Apple's traditional route of leaning toward clean, expertly designed layouts, scaling back some of the flourish of Calendar and the oddball OS X Contacts."


I think that, for Ive, it's a rock and a hard place. However there is a solution and that is vector graphics! A lot of the problem with today's websites/software is that they are designed for specific screen sizes, once again designers have to account for yet another new screen size (iPad Mini) and it just bloats the software, so why not use vectors?

The bonus being that if a user likes minimalist design then they can have a particular theme and if they like the skeuomorphic detailed stuff then they can have it, but those themes are just a file with mathematical numbers in, no heavy graphics to load, it's not like processors can handle heavy vector use.

This article came across as an opportunity by the author to air some personal gripes, as for Apples neglected software like the non-updates stocks and shares/weather apps (widgets) I think it's time to let go of that fierce control and to allow 3rd parties to take over, that complete control Apple holds is of little use now, it may have been useful as a diving point in 2007 but now they're spreading the company too thin.
post #53 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

"Yes, yellow leather and 18 gauge thread (that's 120 for Europeans) wasn't the best idea."
To be honest, this doesn't bother me so much.
What does bother me is that they spent time doing this, rather than adding features or fixing bugs.
Consider iOS's Podcasts app. Nice reel-to-reel UI, which I'm sure took someone a long time to develop.
Sadly, they didn't spend that same amount of time making the app actually work. For instance, it periodically resets and claims that every single episode of some podcast has not been heard. It so utterly filled with bugs that it's useless.
Now I do believe looks are important. But they're not *everything*, and it seems that's all Apple has been doing. Perhaps that was Forestall, and if so, good riddance.

Well, I doubt if they spent very much time implementing the leather look. The hooks have to be there, anyway, so it's probably not a whole lot more than substituting one image for another.

Besides, the people who make the images are probably not the people who fix bugs or add features.
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post #54 of 132
I am extremely excited by Ive's "promotion" and future work on human interfaces at Apple. It can only be good because the interface was really going the wrong way with all that horrible skeumorphism bad taste... I can't wait to see iOS and OS X evolve with Ive's great design in mind...
post #55 of 132

Jon is an absolute legend. I am sure he will sort out the mess of different ideas strewn across iOS and Mac OS X. Goodbye inconsistency! 1smile.gif

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post #56 of 132
Originally Posted by jewidrey View Post
However there is a solution and that is vector graphics! A lot of the problem with today's websites/software is that they are designed for specific screen sizes, once again designers have to account for yet another new screen size (iPad Mini) and it just bloats the software, so why not use vectors?
The bonus being that if a user likes minimalist design then they can have a particular theme and if they like the skeuomorphic detailed stuff then they can have it, but those themes are just a file with mathematical numbers in, no heavy graphics to load, it's not like processors can handle heavy vector use.
This article came across as an opportunity by the author to air some personal gripes, as for Apples neglected software like the non-updates stocks and shares/weather apps (widgets) I think it's time to let go of that fierce control and to allow 3rd parties to take over, that complete control Apple holds is of little use now, it may have been useful as a diving point in 2007 but now they're spreading the company too thin.

 

Hmm, interesting.

 

1. If you're not a troll and actually have a valid point, why not use a real e-mail service to sign up here? 

2. I like the idea of vector graphics everywhere, particularly since everything's moving to retina. 

3. No themes, period. The UI works because it is the way it is, not because people get to choose how it looks. They don't know how best to make it look. You want an example of how that is bad, look at Android. Now look at Apple's reviews, customer satisfaction, developer standings, and ecosystem over the past, well, decade.

4. It is not time for Apple to "let go", they are not "spreading the company too thin", whatever that means.

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post #57 of 132

The biggest problem with the skeuomorphic approach is that it tends to constrain real innovation that might be possible for the interface of that particular app. Calendar is maybe the best example. Apple took a major step backwards here. They basically said: "We're done with calendar. There's nothing new, innovative or useful that can be done here." I believe that's wrong. But the application of the whole desktop calendar metaphor, I believe, constrained and even blinded them from the possible innovations here.

 

The podcast app is cute but kinda stupid and useless. Again there are probably some great possibilities if they discard stupid things like real-to-real tape deck imagery.

 

I just think the skeuomorphic approach has been over done and taken way too far. That said it doesn't mean they need to go the complete opposite extreme. Other places like the Compass and Notes...eh...not such a big deal. There's probably not much improvement to make to lined note pads or the classic compass (though there might be some with that.)

 

I do like some of what Microsoft is doing in Metro. There's something to be said for the cleaner look, simpler icons, etc.

 

It will certainly be very interesting to see what Ive's leadership and team (I seriously doubt he's going to be mocking up UI's himself) will bring to this area of Apple's products. Some greater unity and consistency as well as a clearer vision would be a major improvement.

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post #58 of 132
In other words, Ive is now second in command at Apple. 1smile.gif

Notwithstanding Cook, Apple is now Ive's baby.
post #59 of 132

I think iWeb is a missed opportunity too. It had (has?) the potential to be a standard, a perfect fit in the iLife suite and with the potential to develop into a pro version. What better way to push the HTML5 standard than to produce a classy Apple app that gets the masses using it? Generally speaking, it seems to me that the software side at Apple doesn't get the love it once did, whether Jony at the helm of HIG improves the situation time will tell.

 

On Transatlantic language wrangles: one I really don't get is 'I could care less'. What does that mean exactly? 'I could not care less' makes sense, it means the matter has no relevance to you, but 'could care less' ?

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post #60 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxMacCary View Post

I certainly hope so.
I just got finished buying some Skype time on their website.
God forbid I'd be able to do that, you know, in the Skype app itself ....
Anyhoo, the Skype website has gone Windows8 wholehog.
It looks really, really clean & easy to use -- in other words, very Apple-esque.
I'm unsure what website you are referring to, I just tried the Skype site, it's a disaster of design.
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post #61 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

In other words, Ive is now second in command at Apple. 1smile.gif
Notwithstanding Cook, Apple is now Ive's baby.

Don't fool yourself.. Cook has really been showing who the boss is.

 

I just hope that Ive does not even think about getting on Cook's way to world domination...

 

*and down the stock goes... But by how much?

 

lucky besterds, another buying opportunity. but 600 a share? i don't have enough money to buy one single share.. lol

post #62 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by allblue View Post

I think iWeb is a missed opportunity too. It had (has?) the potential to be a standard, a perfect fit in the iLife suite and with the potential to develop into a pro version. What better way to push the HTML5 standard than to produce a classy Apple app that gets the masses using it?

 

The problem here is that I don't suspect that "the masses" are sitting around creating websites. Not so much because they can't or don't have cool and easy to use tools such as iWeb, but because they don't want or care to. I suspect that the extent of personal, consumer web publishing is handled through things like Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

 

So iWeb was a solution looking for a problem (at least in the consumer space.)

 

As for a professional version...sure that would have been a good route to go, but It's not Apple's focus much anymore, and that's fine. In fact I wouldn't at all be surprised to find Apple get out of the professional apps business altogether. It would be nice if they spun it off (a la Claris in the old days) and, hopefully, it would be sustainable on its own. I do think Apple probably needs to streamline and focus a bit in software.

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post #63 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

There is never going to be a single design language that will please everyone out there, and with the sheer amount of users iOS has, there will always be a huge number of vocal critics, no matter which direction they head into.
As for minimalism, I dont see how much more minimal iOS can get without looking like the sea of white that are google apps, or massive text over solid colors that is Win8 design style. Its pretty minimal as is, and apart from a couple textures in some apps (which I dont mind in the least, gives some personality and some differentiation) theres nothing thats there that doesnt need to be there.
Oh, and Ill be pissed if Ive takes away my woodgrain bookshelf. Dont get the hate about that, its the most gorgeous app on iOS or anywhere. What the **** would people prefer, a text list? Its beautiful and functional.

Like it or not, Apple's iOS apps like Podcasts are also an important part of the OS, and that app is a complete disaster. The dialler in iOS 6 is a disaster. And the colour-changing status bar is ug-lee! Game Centre? There's a lot of work to do. Notes too, IMO. Also, Notes and iCloud have issues, serious issues.
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post #64 of 132
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Originally Posted by AnalogJack View Post

**** yeah!

 

Mind your language. That kind of spake is only acceptable in Bleed'n Dublin

post #65 of 132
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Originally Posted by allblue View Post


On Transatlantic language wrangles: one I really don't get is 'I could care less'. What does that mean exactly? 'I could not care less' makes sense, it means the matter has no relevance to you, but 'could care less' ?

Groan. Just look it up. Sarcastic inversions.

Both are correct.
post #66 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


I have a hard time with the complaints about stitched leather. It's just not that big a deal. It doesn't add much, but it doesn't detract. How is the calendar an less usable because of the leather?
People make too big a deal out of silly things.

I think the key issue with this stitched leather, and other similar design efforts, is that its design and implementation took away from adding and improving functionality. From what I've read (rumors all, of course) is these kind of decisions was an important source of friction between Forstall and Ive.

post #67 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


Groan. Just look it up. Sarcastic inversions.
Both are correct.


Oh I see. So if I say what I don't mean it doesn't mean that I don't mean what I do say. But does that mean I mean it or not? Time to put Jony Ive in charge of the English language I reckon!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcHKm0cm-jI

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post #68 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by allblue View Post

I think iWeb is a missed opportunity too. It had (has?) the potential to be a standard, a perfect fit in the iLife suite and with the potential to develop into a pro version. What better way to push the HTML5 standard than to produce a classy Apple app that gets the masses using it? Generally speaking, it seems to me that the software side at Apple doesn't get the love it once did, whether Jony at the helm of HIG improves the situation time will tell.

On Transatlantic language wrangles: one I really don't get is 'I could care less'. What does that mean exactly? 'I could not care less' makes sense, it means the matter has no relevance to you, but 'could care less' ?

could [not] care less == [in]flammible

... Now, with not non-inflammable... There's a real question...
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post #69 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

Yeah, I fall into that camp. I admit to being a little nervous about what Ive might do with interface design because his direction in hardware, while aesthetically remarkable, is leaning towards form over function, sometimes sacrificing performance to achieve prettiness. Making things pretty is fine, but making tools less productive strikes me as a bad idea. In cases where the goals of performance and pretty conflict, I'd prefer the former be given priority.

 

And you're right, I do NOT understand why the thinner iMac is supposedly a "valuable design concept." I'd LIKE to, but I don't really understand the benefit. Can you explain it to me?

Agreed. For each new product announcement, 50% of the PR is how incredibly thin it is. What is the point? The thinness is an engineering marvel; I get that. I'm might be just a clod, but I would not have been able to tell the difference if it wasn't pointed out to me. 

post #70 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Groan. Just look it up. Sarcastic inversions.
Both are correct.

 

"Could care less" is not a sarcastic inversion. "Cheap at half the price" is a sarcastic inversion. It's opposite the expected on purpose to make a comedic point. "Could care less" doesn't make any sense that way (or ANY way). It's just another example of people being too stupid to think about what they're saying.

 

Both are not correct. One is correct, the other is a total obfuscation of meaning.

 

But getting back to the topic, I hope Ive lets us have coloured icons again. I realize they're not as elegant looking as a monochromatic window but they really do reduce errors and increase working speed.

post #71 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


could [not] care less == [in]flammible
... Now, with not non-inflammable... There's a real question...

Mods! He's flaming!

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post #72 of 132
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Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Jonny is the new Steve Jobs of Apple, or at least the closest thing we are going to see. Steve is gone, we have to accept that. Forstall was giving us modern versions of Microsoft Bob from 1995. Leather calendars are not tangible. You cannot feel them so it makes no sense to design a computer calendar around an old item which shows Forstalls age. The next generation of Apple users don't know what a leather calendar is, or a felt pool table.

 

I think it's an even better situation than that. Perviously, SJ was the arbiter of taste at Apple, but he was picking designs from at least 2 different groups. By making JI the arbiter of taste, and head of all the design, hardware and software, the lines between hardware and software are likely to become even more blurred, the devices and software even more tightly integrated. A very smart move on Tim Cook's part.

post #73 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotoformat View Post

 

An increasing number of English words and their "new" uses have become acceptable this century... but it does not necessarily make them proper. On your side of the pond more and more photographers are writing "lense" when describing a "lens" (singular)... so much so it has become acceptable, although it is neither proper nor correct. Let's just hope, in order to keep this "on thread", that Jony Ive will uphold standards... but of course, he is a Brit  ;~)

 

PS: My feeling is that in fifty years time historians might look back and declare that the universal use of Twitter put the final nail in the lid of the coffin burying proper English.

English has been an evolving language for hundreds of years. Look at a piece of literature from 1950 and compare it something from 1850 or 1750 or 1650. There is no "canonical" form of English that is set in stone. It is arguable that the greatest work in English literature, the King James Bible, doesn't sound anything like "proper" English. Spellings, phrases, and rules change pretty much every couple of generations. Deal with it! 1smile.gif

post #74 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I think it's an even better situation than that. Perviously, SJ was the arbiter of taste at Apple, but he was picking designs from at least 2 different groups. By making JI the arbiter of taste, and head of all the design, hardware and software, the lines between hardware and software are likely to become even more blurred, the devices and software even more tightly integrated. A very smart move on Tim Cook's part.

 

I think you've nailed it. Plus, I actually think Ive's style and taste are probably better than Jobs. Jobs was good at pushing people and sometimes pushing for "unreasonable" things that ended up becoming new minimum standards. His taste and style were good. He had an intuitive sense. But he was also often wrong (Sunflower Mac anyone?) Ive has the schooling and training and professional discipline to do all of it even better.

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post #75 of 132

The unified look does have a subtle brushed aluminum texture, matching current hardware...

I don't particularly mind that some apps look unique. My notepad looks like a notepad? Makes sense! I'm all for consistent guidelines, but if my system is nothing but identical grey boxes, finding what I need takes a little longer. Remember, it's all about usability, not just for tech-heads but for everyone. If you personally find a leather titlebar so offensive, there's about a thousand 3rd party apps you can use instead.

 

SolipsismX View Post
A little googling would have helped you here. Both the words champ and chomp mean the same thing in this case just as at and on can both mean the location of something. I could tell you the original phrase but an imitative term dating back as far as 1520 has absolutely no baring on what is proper and acceptable in English in 2012.

Bearing. And yes, I hate to be that guy...

 

ascii View Post

And there are some who argue that human beings work more quickly with words, so trying to make everything graphical is wrong-headed, i.e. a word can represent an abstract concept, but as soon as you try to draw it you are forced to concretise the concept to some particular instance or another, which is then misleading about what the button does.

And the whole idea of buttons, sliders etc is a control panel metaphor, that goes back to before monitors. People used to have banks of controls and then monitors were invented, and they just drew the same old controls on the monitor! That seems like it needs a rethink.

The only misleading button I can think of is old style 'Save' icons being floppy discs, but Apple has automated that functionality, removing the need for a button. More to the point, well-made icons can greatly aid comprehension and speed of operation, especially for the language impaired. Apple products have a terrific track record among the extremely young, old, and disabled, due in no small part to being easy to understand.

 

Ireland View Post
The dialler in iOS 6 is a disaster. And the colour-changing status bar is ug-lee! Game Centre? There's a lot of work to do. Notes too, IMO. Also, Notes and iCloud have issues, serious issues.

Dialer. Also, why?

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post #76 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


A little googling would have helped you here. Both the words champ and chomp mean the same thing in this case just as at and on can both mean the location of something. I could tell you the original phrase but an imitative term dating back as far as 1520 has absolutely no baring on what is proper and acceptable in English in 2012.

 

Yes, as long as you don't mix up 'chomp' and 'chop', you'll be fine.

post #77 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorsos View Post

I don't particularly mind that some apps look unique. My notepad looks like a notepad? Makes sense! I'm all for consistent guidelines, but if my system is nothing but identical grey boxes, finding what I need takes a little longer.

 

Remember that "consistency" doesn't necessarily mean "same."

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #78 of 132

I would like to see a couple things evolve from this management change:

 

  1. The creation and articulation of a consistent vision and a philosophy about how software UI will be done. This is higher level than, but should lead to and result in guidelines, standards and rules to increasing levels of detail as appropriate.
  2. The development of a consistent visual design language for the UI across all products, apps and hardware. Something that respects each.

 

Personally I hope this will include less UI "flourish" or "bling" (or UI "masturbation" as one critic put it.)

 

Personally I'd start to get rid of some of the so-called skeuomorphism, the sometimes excessively rounded corners and over use of the faux-reflective "glass" surface.

 

On the other hand the monochromatic stuff may have gone too far the other way.

 

In the end, I hope there's a trend toward starting with the purpose and goal of the UI/app/software and building out from there.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #79 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

A little googling would have helped you here. Both the words champ and chomp mean the same thing in this case just as at and on can both mean the location of something. I could tell you the original phrase but an imitative term dating back as far as 1520 has absolutely no baring on what is proper and acceptable in English in 2012.

Okay, you are saying that one can just use words that have the same or similar meaning. So I can just say "biting hard on the bar" because biting hard is the same as champing and chomping, and bar is the same as bit and is more acceptable in "English in 2012". It's good to know that since we are in "English 2012", we are free to bastardize the language.
post #80 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

"Could care less" is not a sarcastic inversion. "Cheap at half the price" is a sarcastic inversion. It's opposite the expected on purpose to make a comedic point. "Could care less" doesn't make any sense that way (or ANY way). It's just another example of people being too stupid to think about what they're saying.

Both are not correct. One is correct, the other is a total obfuscation of meaning.

But getting back to the topic, I hope Ive lets us have coloured icons again. I realize they're not as elegant looking as a monochromatic window but they really do reduce errors and increase working speed.

You know, Google can be your friend: http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/g09.html

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