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Jony Ive expected to replace iOS, OS X textures with clean edges & flat surfaces - Page 4

post #121 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross 
I even liked the brushed metal. I never understood what some people hated about it. The grey that followed is bland and boring.

It was too strong that it distracted you from the content. The design shouldn't pull your focus away from what's being presented. The pages of a book for example don't distract you from the story. The bezel of a TV doesn't pull your focus away from the movie. Most of the aqua UI was distracting IMO and I'm glad it has been toned down. There are places where it has gone too far the other way though - the coloured icons for shortcuts weren't distracting and actually made helpful associations but are now all grey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross 
I hope iBooks won't give us the flat page that both the Kindle and Nook apps have. They aren't easier to read, if anything, they're more difficult. I do agree with one criticism on iBooks. If they're going to imitate a book, they should have the thickness of the pages change as we read through. Start with a page on the left, and a large number on the right which changes as we move to the end.

I agree with that. Those kind of designs add functional improvements.

I wonder who it was that designed the calculator UI. That's a Braun design so I'd guess it was Ive. I doubt he'll immediately tone everything down to sterility, just remove distracting elements and ones that violate good taste.
post #122 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Quite true. Apple is the greatest guessing-game on Earth!
Plus I'm sick of all these "what experience does Ive have blah blah blah". What experience did Steve Jobs have? He didn't have a degree in engineering or design. And Forstall no doubt is a brilliant engineer but does that translate to being brilliant in software UI/UX? Go on LinkedIn and look up Apple UI/UX employees. You'll find that many of them have design/art degrees not engineering degrees. In fact several I looked up had industrial design degrees. Maybe some of these employees are psyched about having a fellow designer running the show.
post #123 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by boredumb View Post

No, it doesn't.

I am thinking, for example, of the new iPhone keypad in iOS6...

I'm sure some like it fine, but to me it looked like a high school project or beta when I first saw it.

"Simplistic" doesn't always translate to "sophisticated",

and, for me anyway, a physical world look is always more welcome than a machine language look.

Just a personal preference.

I agree with the iPhone keypad statement.  It reminds me of the keypad for Google Voice.  Me no likey.

Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

 

Calming? Instead of paying $$$ to Ive, why not just distribute some Xanax with every iDevice?
 

I vote yes for that!

2010 mac mini/iPad OG/iPhone 4/appletv OG/appletv 2/ BT trackpad and keyboard/time capsule/ Wii
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2010 mac mini/iPad OG/iPhone 4/appletv OG/appletv 2/ BT trackpad and keyboard/time capsule/ Wii
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post #124 of 188

I like skeuomorphic design. I like the felt fabric texture used in game center image above.

 

I hate the flat featureless/textureless world of Win8, and would hate to see this end up dominating OSX/iOS.

 

Mac is supposed to be my escape if I get too annoyed with Windows changes when I go to buy my next computer.

 

Why not just have a couple of optional skins?

post #125 of 188

An example of a beautiful "Flat" UI that works can be found in Ableton's Live.  While most other audio production systems sought to emulate the look and feel of the physical real world counterparts, Ableton took a radically different approach, if in part to reduce the processing load, and thereby increase the stability and capability of the software. What's more they did it with understatement and elegance that improved visual understanding of what was happening at any moment within the app.

 

Personally, I dislike the textures and the aping of "hard" world objects in software for aesthetic purposes. Sure, if you're trying to preserve a usage paradigm, there may be some point in copying the mechanical aspects of an object. But I really don't like faux leather, faux paper, faux etc etc etc. Whether that makes me right brain, left brain or no brain, who knows?

post #126 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It was too strong that it distracted you from the content. The design shouldn't pull your focus away from what's being presented.

 

Bingo!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

The pages of a book for example don't distract you from the story. The bezel of a TV doesn't pull your focus away from the movie.

 

Indeed. In fact, there's a risk, with a TV, that if the bezel become too thin the content you're viewing is not well framed was you're watching it, creating a distraction of a different kind. Same can be said about "pages" and written content.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Most of the aqua UI was distracting IMO and I'm glad it has been toned down.

 

Agreed. It was cute at first, but ultimately it was a distraction.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

I doubt he'll immediately tone everything down to sterility, just remove distracting elements and ones that violate good taste.

 

Probably. Better to go slow except where something is a mega fail.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #127 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

As described Ive's designs sounds like they're going to be very boring.  A little bit of "unnecessary flourish" can go a long way.

Won't be sad to see the end of stitched leather and felt though...

I disagree. From that perspective, one could say that current MacBooks are boring. You know, very uniform, all same colour/texture metal surfaces, flat, sharp edges, not much happening there comapred to some, say, Toshibas (curvier, different colours and textures, yara yara yara). End yet those MacBooks are, arguably, the best looking laptops in the world.

"Boring" can be awesome, if it is "boring" the right way.

Of course, rest is down to individual preference.
post #128 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

YAY!!!


The faux-felt of Game Center doesn't bother me.  The leather texture in Find My Friends and Calendar doesn't bother me either.  Those are simply background images that can be easily swapped out for something cleaner.

The skeuomorphic graphics that really bother me are the ones that use up screen space for no reason.  Like the fake torn paper edges in Notes (in iOS and OS X.)  Anything that wastes pixels on screen is bad IMHO.  Every pixel is important, especially on mobile device screens.  

Note: when I say "waste" I mean "using up screen space that could otherwise be used by more information."  So skeuomorphisms like the spinning reel-to-reel tape deck animation in Podcasts don't count as "waste."  Because there's not much to display while the podcast is playing anyway.  But burning up a few pixels' worth of space that could otherwise have been used to display an extra line of text (torn paper in Notes) does count as "waste."

Have you ever done any work in publishing? That was a large part of my business. In publishing, we know that space, and the proper use of it is just as important than the words on the page. It can be even more important. The object isn't to get as much on the page. It's to make that information easier to digest, and more comfortable to access.

You're not supposed to use as many pixels as you can for information. Whether you like so e of the designs is personal to you, but you're concept is wrong.
post #129 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post


Sounds like you talk to Scott often?

No, I never spoke to him. Heard enough though. But you must know him well, since you're on a first-name basis. My condolences to you.

post #130 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

SF not SJ. It's apparent without even talking to him, that his approach is from an engineering (software) mindset, which is his strength (and therefor his weakness.)

The transition to new, simple, innovative is not hard for users. But is very difficult for designers to produce. This difficulty is one reason we see so few innovative products. It's hard. Its much easier to design "looking back" than it is "looking ahead." This is why products so often fall back to trite, "literal" design strategies.

Ah, ok. I read it as SJ because everything you said could have applied to him. Remember that he was the obsessed guy. He was the one who spent a weekend moving a few pixels around on the icon shadows until he got it the way he wanted it. There was no way that SF made these decisions without SJ approving them.
post #131 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It was too strong that it distracted you from the content. The design shouldn't pull your focus away from what's being presented. The pages of a book for example don't distract you from the story. The bezel of a TV doesn't pull your focus away from the movie. Most of the aqua UI was distracting IMO and I'm glad it has been toned down. There are places where it has gone too far the other way though - the coloured icons for shortcuts weren't distracting and actually made helpful associations but are now all grey.

I never found it to be distracting. Certainly less so than the crazy color combinations that Microsoft uses.

When I concentrated on the content, I ignored the rest. I don't know why some thought that was a problem.
Quote:
I agree with that. Those kind of designs add functional improvements.
I wonder who it was that designed the calculator UI. That's a Braun design so I'd guess it was Ive. I doubt he'll immediately tone everything down to sterility, just remove distracting elements and ones that violate good taste.

The calculator always reminded me of HP calculators, of which I have more than a few from over the years.
post #132 of 188

If Apple makes the UI and the shape of app icons look flat and generic, Apple will lose big chunk of fanbase, including myself. Don't even think of getting rid of bookshelf in the iBooks app and paper shredder in the Passbook app, if you do, I am switching to Win 8. I promise.

post #133 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

It's best to let go of the whole MS tile interface idea. Metro is junk. It really does look like the interface was inspired by MS' worry about violating existing patents. Their entire mobile platform is in the toilet. 

iOS rates highest in customer satisfaction. All the devices it runs on have ruled customer satisfaction since their inception. ALL OF THEM. Not some, but ALL. 

iOS is the most viable mobile OS out there. It provides the best user experience. That's not opinion. It's fact. 

No, it is just an opinion. Now that is fact.
post #134 of 188
All these comment prove is you can never satisfy everyone. Keep it as is some hate it, make changes some hate it. I personally don't care for the felt and others, but I do like the paper cutter effect in passbook I think it's cute, clever and a small but nice touch.

Jobs was a minimalist for the most part and I like Ive and have faith in him, look forward to see what he does.
post #135 of 188

I bet Ricardo Montalban likes the Corinthian leather on the calendar.

post #136 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by 69ergoo View Post

If Apple makes the UI and the shape of app icons look flat and generic, Apple will lose big chunk of fanbase, including myself. Don't even think of getting rid of bookshelf in the iBooks app and paper shredder in the Passbook app, if you do, I am switching to Win 8. I promise.

That's hilarious.

post #137 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Ah, ok. I read it as SJ because everything you said could have applied to him. Remember that he was the obsessed guy. He was the one who spent a weekend moving a few pixels around on the icon shadows until he got it the way he wanted it. There was no way that SF made these decisions without SJ approving them.

I believe Jobs was less and less involved in the graphic design decisions the last few years. The reason I say this is because if you look at his design aesthetic from the early days of the Macintosh, it was much more understated, and much more elegant. I feel that especially with iTunes 10, QuickTime X, and others, they really got away from good design principles, in both usability and attractiveness.

 

My feeling is that as time went along (maybe as Jobs got sicker), he was so into making the big things (iPhone, iPad, TV, etc), which were incredibly large undertakings, that he didn't oversee the little design elements of iTunes, QuickTime X, etc. so much, and let the engineers (Forstall) make those decisions. Just my opinion, but there was a marked movement away from good, clean design. (And I don't consider Aqua to be that bad - sort of an experiment that they toned down little by little).

 

There's also been a move away from usability, like hiding scroll bars (and making them too narrow), putting in "pretty" elements that require more clicking to use, etc. I'm guessing Jobs wasn't spending very much time examining the software design details and using the software. Again, just my opinion.

 

The worst thing is the unfinished products Apple has released, going back to the new iMovie and continuing through QuickTime X, Final Cut X, Siri, maps, etc.

post #138 of 188
More inside info from businessweek. http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-11-01/apple-s-minimalist-ive-assumes-jobs-s-role-setting-design-vision

Sounds like the HI team at Apple consists of about 20 people, is located in th same building as ID and like ID is off limits to most Apple employees. A couple interesting tidbits:
Quote:
Supporters admire Forstall’s ability to manage massive technical complexity while pushing his team to innovate. Critics said he was overly concerned with empire building and pushing through favored features while blocking other teams’ ideas. British-born Ive is known for his deliberate, careful choice of words, and for crediting members of his team while minimizing his own role in development of products.
Quote:
Forstall’s team was particularly insular, and aggressive about pursuing its own goals, said Halle, who ran the team that built much of the common operating software inside Macs and the mobile devices. He said that Forstall often was uninterested in making improvements that would benefit other group’s products.

“Scott wasn’t supportive of melding” the Mac operating system with the mobile operating system initially, Halle said. “He just didn’t care.”
Quote:
Forstall had inspired intense loyalty among many of the critical engineers who churn out the iOS iPhone and iPad software upgrades each year. His staff was blindsided by the firing, and even his assistant was caught by surprise, people with knowledge of the matter said.
post #139 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

More inside info from businessweek. http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-11-01/apple-s-minimalist-ive-assumes-jobs-s-role-setting-design-vision
Sounds like the HI team at Apple consists of about 20 people, is located in th same building as ID and like ID is off limits to most Apple employees. A couple interesting tidbits:

A very interesting article indeed.  Regarding the last quote, hopefully those iOS engineers intensely loyal to Forstall don't just up and leave.  The mobile space is hyper-competitive and Apple needs all the top talent it can get and keep.

post #140 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shameer Mulji View Post

A very interesting article indeed.  Regarding the last quote, hopefully those iOS engineers intensely loyal to Forstall don't just up and leave.  The mobile space is hyper-competitive and Apple needs all the top talent it can get and keep.

I'm curious about these guys who shared most of the patents with Forstall. I hope they don't decide to jump ship. Though I'm assuming they'll be working under Federighi and not Ive?

2vao4d2.jpg
post #141 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


I'm curious about these guys who shared most of the patents with Forstall. I hope they don't decide to jump ship. Though I'm assuming they'll be working under Federighi and not Ive?
2vao4d2.jpg

Assuming they're still at Apple & they are on the iOS engineering team, then they would work under Federighi, who also was hired by Jobs to work at NeXT.

post #142 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

Somewhere, there is a video interview of Ive in which he describes how the iPhone should be all about the screen and how he wants to get rid of everything else. I believe he (and Jobs) has the same vision about the iMac. The iMac was destined to look like this latest version, from day one. 

 

It's been fairly obvious that this is where Jobs and Ive have been pushing Apple's products for years. That and the elimination of buttons, ports and cables. Just look at the evolution of the iMac.

 

This direction makes me wonder whether Ive got to a point where he started to realize that his role in designing the physical devices was going to start becoming less and less useful and important. I mean it's getting to the point where there's nothing more to design there and, in fact, what's on the screen is the next frontier so he started to pine for more influence over that aspect.

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post #143 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

It's been fairly obvious that this is where Jobs and Ive have been pushing Apple's products for years. That and the elimination of buttons, ports and cables. Just look at the evolution of the iMac.

 

This direction makes me wonder whether Ive got to a point where he started to realize that his role in designing the physical devices was going to start becoming less and less useful and important. I mean it's getting to the point where there's nothing more to design there and, in fact, what's on the screen is the next frontier so he started to pine for more influence over that aspect.

All very good points.

post #144 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

It's thin because optical drives are dead and people want thinner, lighter hardware, even when it comes to desktop computers. The new iMac is cool. And cool is nice to look at, and nice to own and buy. How much RAM do you need? All computers are going this way, the iPad is setting the trend. Installing hardware yourself will be a thing of the past in all computers within 10 years.

People either understand and value quality, beauty and coolness or they don't. It's almost impossible to explain to theaveragejoe why you purchased a Lexus or Rolex when they counter that their $2 digital watch keeps time just as good and their Ford Festiva gets them from point A to point B just as easily.

Why are iMacs and iPads so thin and yet remain on continuous diets? If you're perplexed by this, the answer is only going to make it worse.

Hot tip: max out the ram when you buy your iMac and stop bemoaning progress.
post #145 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Have you ever done any work in publishing? That was a large part of my business. In publishing, we know that space, and the proper use of it is just as important than the words on the page. It can be even more important. The object isn't to get as much on the page. It's to make that information easier to digest, and more comfortable to access.
You're not supposed to use as many pixels as you can for information. Whether you like so e of the designs is personal to you, but you're concept is wrong.


Curious... Why do so many books align the text so it nearly disappears into the crack? We are left bending the book and squashing it flat until we finally break the all-to-flimsy spine.

When I'm king, the text will be rescued from the crack.
post #146 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by igriv View Post

I want to go back to big-endian vs little-endian.
 

Trying to remember the reference. Kesey? Now there was a right-brain guy.
post #147 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

It's been fairly obvious that this is where Jobs and Ive have been pushing Apple's products for years. That and the elimination of buttons, ports and cables. Just look at the evolution of the iMac.

 

This direction makes me wonder whether Ive got to a point where he started to realize that his role in designing the physical devices was going to start becoming less and less useful and important. I mean it's getting to the point where there's nothing more to design there and, in fact, what's on the screen is the next frontier so he started to pine for more influence over that aspect.

Until he makes an iMac that disappears when you look at it sideways, he'll keep trying.

post #148 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post


People either understand and value quality, beauty and coolness or they don't. It's almost impossible to explain to theaveragejoe why you purchased a Lexus or Rolex when they counter that their $2 digital watch keeps time just as good and their Ford Festiva gets them from point A to point B just as easily.
Why are iMacs and iPads so thin and yet remain on continuous diets? If you're perplexed by this, the answer is only going to make it worse.
Hot tip: max out the ram when you buy your iMac and stop bemoaning progress.

That thinking falls flat when you need the physical tools to do your professional work. You're starting to have to choose between quality, coolness and beauty on the one hand, and your professional life on the other. You used to get both in the same computer.

post #149 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


Trying to remember the reference. Kesey? Now there was a right-brain guy.

 

Boy, nothing like a high-powered intellectual discussion with a well-edumacated feller such as yourself....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulliver%27s_travels#Cultural_influences

post #150 of 188
@Mac-sochist: Thanks. and to think I read it—50 years ago.

I could have looked it up, now couldn't I have, but that would be cheating.
Edited by Flaneur - 11/2/12 at 1:35am
post #151 of 188
I want all my icons to look like glass so I can arrange them to look like a stained glass window portrait of 'The Woz'.
We become what we behold. We shape our tools and then our tools shape us.- Marshall McLuhan

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post #152 of 188

In general, I'd like to say how completely ignorant a large percentage of these post sound to me. This notion that Ives is the puppet master and is the sole-artist behind everything.  If you read any of the interviews with him, you'll notice that said notion is totally BS.  In fact, he goes out of his way to reinforce the idea that the ID team at Apple prides itself on collaboration.  They don't even have assigned seating.  It's all one big communal space and everyone works together to find the best solution for a given problem.  Sure Ives is the face behind the end product, but he's only the spokesman, and the tie-breaker.

 

Second, most of you here sound like you know very little about the design process.  It's not about simply changing the look of the UI, it's about how they function as well, the synthesis between concept and application...form follows function.  Have any of you even thought about the notion that maybe the "Fresh Approach" we all keep hearing about by speculative bloggers will look at how the UI works globally over the entire OS, then to the App, and specifically each function...rather than just changing the look of everything and calling it a day?  Have you thought that maybe the simple notion of re-thinking how each UI task functions will be the starting point rather than just what it looks like?

 

If anything, that's where I think Team Ives (as I like to call them) will start.  Let's look at the previous over-all design concept for OSX and iOS.  Analyze them, find their deficiencies, and come up with some solutions that help reinforce what made the original concept great, and continue unify them by a fresh new concept that backs up the original idea, but in a fresh new way.  Then we can look at finding the best possible solution to how we interact with each individual function, find the commonalities to the over-all conceptual approach to the OS and apply it system-wide.

 


That's the difference between the Artist and the Engineer...The designer and the builder.  However, the exceptional Artists are the ones who have a firm understanding and appreciation of the engineering.  And like-wise the most gifted Engineers are the ones who have a tremendous eye for design.  Sound familiar?  "The intersection of the Liberal Arts and Technology".
 

Aesthetic is always going to be a subjective thing.  Some people like one type of design, some the opposite...and some, a third option.  IMO, what makes Apple's UI so successful are two things: Easy to use, and friendly.  Even the original Macintosh, Jobs wanted the aesthetic to look like it was smiling, and look as easy to use as a food-processor.  Those are the two core concepts that I think Apple's products have never wavered from.  Like them or not the skeuomorphic designs give Apples products friendly association (albeit sometimes dated) and very clearly tell the customer what they do.  In most cases, they are quite brilliant, and in specific cases, those skeuomorphic designs are also reflected in the actual UI as well.  Contacts is an address book and the UI functions just like a book.  Same with Calendars, iBooks.  Maps has that lovely flipping of the map like a physical paper map to reveal additional functions, like a real map would to find an index or further explanation.  However, as a side note, I'd like to say I'd rather it folded up a bit with some creases to reveal the additional functions to further draw the connection.  Notes looks like  an Office Depot generic yellow pad of paper.  Why?  Probably because the yellow is a bit easier on the eyes with such a bright display.  The lines on the paper make it easier to read and makes it feel more like real life.  The examples continue, and you probably get where i'm going.  It's the synthesis between function and form and reinforcing the core concepts (easy and friendly) is what makes Apple's products so compelling.

 

For someone to say that Team Ives is just going to make everything a minimalist clean look is totally misunderstanding the concepts behind Apple's products and clearly thinking only skin-deep.

post #153 of 188
So, according to the Wall Street Journal, Greg Christie, who is VP of Human Interface and reported to Scott Forstall, will now report to Craig Federighi. The WSJ also said Forstwll and Christie had regular design meetings with Steve. I'm assuming Jony Ive will now sit in on those meetings. But it makes me wonder then how much influence Ive will really have in this area if HI isn't actually reporting to him. Who makes the call then on what the final UI design will look like? Ive or Federighi? And how much direction will HI take from Ive when they don't report to him? I mean its one thing if Steve Jobs is giving you direction. Would Ive command the same respect? 1hmm.gif
post #154 of 188
Thank goodness. Everytime Game Centre popped up I thought it was some annoying in-game promotion for a poker site. Only recently did I realise its actually something to do with Apple.
post #155 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

...................

The worst thing is the unfinished products Apple has released, going back to the new iMovie and continuing through QuickTime X, Final Cut X, Siri, maps, etc.

As one closes in on true artificial intelligence, the more unfinished one's ambitious undertaking appears to one's impatient mind.
post #156 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

....
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For someone to say that Team Ives is just going to make everything a minimalist clean look is totally misunderstanding the concepts behind Apple's products and clearly thinking only skin-deep.

Tim Cook is the consummate COO whom fate has thrusted into a consummate CEO succession. The Peter Principle plays to the fullest of its ill-fated conclusion here. He direly needs to lean on a designer's chutzpah to keep this tall ship afloat, ...and fold onto a master craftsman's lap his 'Grand Design' shortcomings and his somehow overly grounded field of vision. 

Team Ive is used to work wonder on 3D physical space, ...with Time weighing in as a constant. A natural follow-up to sculpting physical objects, ...and give them further depth of meaning, would be to extend his acute 3D sensitivity to virtual space...with Time acting out as the fourth variable. And make iOS/OSX virtual and physical interfaces...one space-time interface continuum. By artistic design. Space-time curvature shaping reality from the physical object to its functionality through an interface lensing effect. A grand unified theory of design as applied to the iOS/OSX universe, ...be it tied up to physical boundaries, ...or lightened up from quanta of information...buoyant offsprings of the Principle of Uncertainty.

The up-and-coming transitional phase from virtual planar to virtual three-space + 1(time) needs be carved out of the sculptor-in-residence ethos. The exquisite robustness of iPhone 5 and iPad Mini laid out in the ethereal space-time interval between form and function. An iOS/OSX UI...depth revolution. Coming next...
post #157 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Berp View Post

Tim Cook is the consummate COO whom fate has thrusted into a consummate CEO succession. The Peter Principle plays to the fullest of its ill-fated conclusion here. He direly needs to lean on a designer's chutzpah to keep this tall ship afloat, ...and fold onto a master craftsman's lap his 'Grand Design' shortcomings and his somehow overly grounded field of vision. 
Team Ive is used to work wonder on 3D physical space, ...with Time weighing in as a constant. A natural follow-up to sculpting physical objects, ...and give them further depth of meaning, would be to extend his acute 3D sensitivity to virtual space...with Time acting out as the fourth variable. And make iOS/OSX virtual and physical interfaces...one space-time interface continuum. By artistic design. Space-time curvature shaping reality from the physical object to its functionality through an interface lensing effect. A grand unified theory of design as applied to the iOS/OSX universe, ...be it tied up to physical boundaries, ...or lightened up from quanta of information...buoyant offsprings of the Principle of Uncertainty.
The up-and-coming transitional phase from virtual planar to virtual three-space + 1(time) needs be carved out of the sculptor-in-residence ethos. The exquisite robustness of iPhone 5 and iPad Mini laid out in the ethereal space-time interval between form and function. An iOS/OSX UI...depth revolution. Coming next...

It's worth quoting this perspective, even though it probably sits just above. I agree completely, and was thinking along the same lines while considering the Jobs/Ive penchant for tactility in their designs, carried into software.

Adding your view, what has been called "texture" in the s'morphic interfaces has actually been preparation for true 3D space in display and manipulation. The desktop can eventually become a room, or many rooms, with maybe a solarium and a garden attached, within which we move and react with things. Onward and outward from there, but the groundwork has been tried out with the 3D-ish "texturing" we've already seen. Truer tactility awaits when we have wearable stereo screens, which I hope Apple is still working on as one of their next big things.

Edit: antkm1 above also sees the shaping of the interface as a crucial part of shaping the hardware. Going to flat, rectilinear and visual-only (Microsoft's approach) would be anti-tactile, and therefore alienating. Except to those who prefer things to be ordered that way, of course—my point about the left-brain dominants who are annoyed by s'morphism. There may also be a number of right-brain people who just think the "textures" are uncool, unhip, too cute. Apple should maybe cool things out a bit to assuage them. Maybe that's what Sir Jony will do: cool things down a bit.
Edited by Flaneur - 11/2/12 at 7:39am
post #158 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So, according to the Wall Street Journal, Greg Christie, who is VP of Human Interface and reported to Scott Forstall, will now report to Craig Federighi. The WSJ also said Forstwll and Christie had regular design meetings with Steve. I'm assuming Jony Ive will now sit in on those meetings.

 

Since one is dead and the other gone from the company, I'd guess those meetings will be with Ive.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

But it makes me wonder then how much influence Ive will really have in this area if HI isn't actually reporting to him. Who makes the call then on what the final UI design will look like? Ive or Federighi? And how much direction will HI take from Ive when they don't report to him?

 

I believe that HI will be reporting up to Ive. That's the whole point. I suspect that Ive and his team will have the say on UI/HI/design issues. Federighi will be about software design, development and implementation. Of course they will need to work closely as I'm sure Ive's team has done in the past with hardware engineering and manufacturing.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Would Ive command the same respect? 1hmm.gif

 

Well he'll certainly have to earn in in some cases. But Ive has a pretty good reputation at this point. I suspect he'll do fine.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #159 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post


Weight.
Size.
Highly valuable functions.
Next.

It doesn't mean a thing.

Who cares about the weight of a desktop computer?

The appearance from the front is almost unchanged. Size change is only in the profile, which is actually slim only on the edge. Total space occupied is almost the same.

??? Highly what?????

Argument value : 0

post #160 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

It doesn't mean a thing.
Who cares about the weight of a desktop computer?
The appearance from the front is almost unchanged. Size change is only in the profile, which is actually slim only on the edge. Total space occupied is almost the same.
??? Highly what?????
Argument value : 0


Apple obviously disagrees with you.

So what's your experience in building and selling game-changing computing devices that makes your opinion more valuable than theirs?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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