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Physicians excited about lab coat pocket-ability of Apple's iPad mini - Page 2

post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

 
There's a difference between a lab coat and your jeans pocket. A lab coat is a perfectly reasonable place to store a Mini. The fact that it's pocketable in large pockets is a real advantage and should be advertised as such. Why shouldn't they? A number of Android tablets did the same thing. Of course, since that was their ONLY advantage, they sort of had to.
 

I agree in so much as this thread is about lab coats however I was replying to a poster who was probably not a physician since he was talking about jacket pockets and jeans pockets which is a reasonable discussion as the ratio of general public to lab coat wearers is quite large. My disappointment in the video shown at the launch was that it depicted a regular guy on the street with it being pocketable, not a physician. Lab coat usage is an insignificantly tiny niche.

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post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

 

I know you're joking, but just sick of people who own Apple stuff being defensive. Let's start taking the high road, guys.

 

I'm with you Ireland.  As for responses here along the lines of "well the Android fanboy's started it", you are missing the point. As a group, Apple fans come off as very defensive which is odd to me. If you know you're good, a little criticism shouldn't bother you.

 

Anyway, I can see this being a good product for physicians except for one thing...it's a big time germ spreader.  Docs are required to wash their hands or use antibacterial gel between patient visits to reduce the spread of germs (though not all do.)  Are they washing their tablet devices with an antibacterial wipe as well?  My guess is no.

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post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneaburns View Post

I'm with you Ireland.  As for responses here along the lines of "well the Android fanboy's started it", you are missing the point. As a group, Apple fans come off as very defensive which is odd to me. If you know you're good, a little criticism shouldn't bother you.

Did you just read five posts into the thread and skip all the replies to that comment?
Quote:
Anyway, I can see this being a good product for physicians except for one thing...it's a big time germ spreader.  Docs are required to wash their hands or use antibacterial gel between patient visits to reduce the spread of germs (though not all do.)  Are they washing their tablet devices with an antibacterial wipe as well?  My guess is no.

It seems to be a bit sad to just assume that they're leaving out something so obvious in their cleaning procedure.
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


Did you just read five posts into the thread and skip all the replies to that comment?
It seems to be a bit sad to just assume that they're leaving out something so obvious in their cleaning procedure.

 

Uh, no.  There are several posts that disagree with Ireland's post.  I am jut agreeing with him.

 

As for the cleaning procedure, it's a little more than an assumption. There have been numerous studies showing a lack of hand washing in hospitals and huge decreases in secondary infections once hand sanitizing programs are implemented. The fact that a program must be implemented shows that there are many health care professionals for which hand sanitizing/washing is not second nature.  By extension, I think it's logical to assume that same population may not sanitize their tablet of choice and that even some that are good hand washers will not take the additional step to sanitize a device between patients.   While it may be an obvious procedure to you and I, it's not to everyone.

iPod, iPad, iPad2, iPad 3, iPad Mini, iPhone, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, AppleTV (1,2 & 3), 13" MacBook Pro, 24" Cinema Display, Time Capsule, 21.5" iMac (Mid 2011)

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post #45 of 59

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneaburns View Post

Uh, no.  There are several posts that disagree with Ireland's post.  I am jut agreeing with him.

So you don't believe the original comment might have just been a sarcastic joke?

Quote:
As for the cleaning procedure, it's a little more than an assumption. There have been numerous studies showing a lack of hand washing in hospitals and huge decreases in secondary infections once hand sanitizing programs are implemented. The fact that a program must be implemented shows that there are many health care professionals for which hand sanitizing/washing is not second nature.  By extension, I think it's logical to assume that same population may not sanitize their tablet of choice and that even some that are good hand washers will not take the additional step to sanitize a device between patients.   While it may be an obvious procedure to you and I, it's not to everyone.

If that's the case, then it's more of the same, not a worsening situation. It sounds like the same problem existed before the device was used, if pens, clipboards and paper tablets weren't given any contamination considerations. If anything, it's an opportunity for those that do take those considerations to heart, as I bet an iPad is considerably easier to clean than those other items.
post #47 of 59
@mstone,

I may not walk around with the Nexus 7 in my pocket but I've travelled with it in my jacket pocket. Very handy when going through airport security to be able to leave it in my jacket. And this is a normal CK windbreaker.

And if Apple didn't make it for portability, what did they make it for?

I think it was a dumb move to make an 8" tablet just so they could claim it wasn't 7". From my handling, I think 7.5" was probably the best. At 7.9", it's not one hand grippable or pocketable. So the only value I can see is the price. It's the cheapest iPad.
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

@mstone,

I may not walk around with the Nexus 7 in my pocket but I've travelled with it in my jacket pocket. Very handy when going through airport security to be able to leave it in my jacket. And this is a normal CK windbreaker.

And if Apple didn't make it for portability, what did they make it for?
 

There are many different uses as this thread demonstrates. One being physician lab coats. I think approximately 50% of western adults routinely carry handbags large enough to fit an iPad mini and many of the other 50%, including myself would be willing to carry it in some other way. When I travel through the airport I am usually wearing a sport coat or suit not a wind breaker. Fortunately, I always have my briefcase which has ample room for toting the mini around. There is no one case scenario for this device. Perhaps a Nexus is easier to carry in certain situations but I wouldn't know what to do with a Nexus since it doesn't connect to any of my other Apple ecosystem features or my Macs or applications so it would be just useless baggage for me.

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post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

@mstone,
I may not walk around with the Nexus 7 in my pocket but I've travelled with it in my jacket pocket. Very handy when going through airport security to be able to leave it in my jacket. And this is a normal CK windbreaker.
And if Apple didn't make it for portability, what did they make it for?
Obviously they did, but clearly they did not intend for you to use it at the airport, since Passbook is not enabled on it.

I think it's great the mini already has a base in the medical field, but merely being able to slip it in ones pocket does not seem reason enough to me to plunk down $330+ if you already have an iPhone AND an iPad unless, like the physicians, you have a need for it in the workplace. Since the mini cannot be used as a phone, are people really going to pay an extra $330+ to carry around a tablet along with their smart phone if they have an iPad at home unless they have a specific need? As mstone points out, most people carry around a bag of some sort capable of carrying a 10" iPad, be it a back pack, briefcase, purse, etc. however, jackets are not at all universal, especially in the Summer. And the men wearing nice suits, I don't really see carrying this around. Women's suits will not have anything like a big enough pocket.
post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

Giant lab coat pockets may be the only ones that work.
I was curious about pocketability so I went to the Apple Store. I left disappointed.
The iPad Mini is not mini enough. My Nexus 7 fits in my jacket and jeans pocket. At the store, the iPad Mini was a very tight fit in the jacket pocket. Zipper wouldn't close. Wasn't even close to fitting in my jeans pockets.
At the size the Mini is, it's not just portability. It's hard to grip the thing with one hand. The extra 15mm compared to the Nexus 7 made a big difference with a wide grip.

 

 

 

Granted Jim is not a small dude...

 

http://www.loopinsight.com/2012/10/31/ipad-mini-fits-in-your-back-pocket/

 

I went to the Apple Store and had the complete opposite experience.  The thing is light, easily held in one hand (I wear med size gloves) and easily would fit in my jacket pocket. 

 

A must buy for me.  It's portable as hell.  White looks good too.

post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

@mstone,
I may not walk around with the Nexus 7 in my pocket but I've travelled with it in my jacket pocket. Very handy when going through airport security to be able to leave it in my jacket. And this is a normal CK windbreaker.

 

You aren't supposed to wear your jacket through the metal detector.  So either way you need to put it into a basket.

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneaburns View Post

Anyway, I can see this being a good product for physicians except for one thing...it's a big time germ spreader.  Docs are required to wash their hands or use antibacterial gel between patient visits to reduce the spread of germs (though not all do.)  Are they washing their tablet devices with an antibacterial wipe as well?  My guess is no.

 

Less big time than a laptop with keyboard.

 

There are a many products for iPads in the medical domain.   Here's a couple:

 

http://store.griffintechnology.com/airstrap-med-case

 

http://www.smartpractice.com/Apps/WebObjects/SmartPractice.woa/wa/style?id=S62036&cid=407057&m=SPD

 

Or you can just toss it in a xray cassette sterile bag.

 

While someone will have do a study to confirm, if the hospital is already very aggressive with their antiseptic hand gels the iPad will be swimming in alcohol.  The standard here is to pump in and pump out.  The lab coat itself is going to be more of an issue than a glass and aluminum iPad that gets wiped down regularly with a wipe between patients.  The sleeves are a freaking petri dish.

 

You'll remove the oleophobic coating but since you're wiping down the screen so much anyway I wouldn't worry too much about skin oil collecting on clinical ipads.

post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcg878 View Post

Lab coat pocket-ability is exactly why I ordered one. An iPad Citrix gives access to most of our hospital's systems, which is useful if a bit awkward. A native system access would be a huge plus, but even emulating a Windows NT screen hospital apps is still invaluable.

 

While the iPad meets HIPPA and ePHI requirements (with the right apps), keeping access limited to Citrix is one way for IT to continue to use legacy EHR systems...

 

Win8 tabets may be better in this regard but they aren't lab coat pocket sized yet.

 

Someone has to explain to me why Epocrates gives a hoot about the pocketability of the iPad mini given it doesn't have an actual iPad version in the app store.  Yah yah, they have their iPad EHR beta thingy but who knows when or if that'll come to market.

post #54 of 59
Sorry, I tried "quote" but apparently received the "reply".
Edited by Vadania - 11/4/12 at 1:55am
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

@mstone,

I may not walk around with the Nexus 7 in my pocket but I've travelled with it in my jacket pocket. Very handy when going through airport security to be able to leave it in my jacket. And this is a normal CK windbreaker.

And if Apple didn't make it for portability, what did they make it for?

I think it was a dumb move to make an 8" tablet just so they could claim it wasn't 7". From my handling, I think 7.5" was probably the best. At 7.9", it's not one hand grippable or pocketable. So the only value I can see is the price. It's the cheapest iPad.

My hands are not particularly large (nor are they particularly small) at 180 mm (7.3 ") long, wrist to fingertip, by 100 mm (4 ") wide, but I had no trouble at all holding an iPad Mini in my left hand for 5 to 10 minutes while typing in my observations of it using one of the Minis at an Apple Store on release day, into the comments section of one of the threads on the AI forums. I barely noticed that I was holding the device most of the time - I was conentrating on typing.

About the only time that I was aware of it from the holding point of view was to think, "Gee, this is light!" At no point did I feel any discomfort or strain. It was very pleasant and easy to hold - and use! I didn't buy one then as I'm waiting for the one with the GPS.
Edited by AlexN - 11/4/12 at 3:46am
post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

 

Someone has to explain to me why Epocrates gives a hoot about the pocketability of the iPad mini given it doesn't have an actual iPad version in the app store.  Yah yah, they have their iPad EHR beta thingy but who knows when or if that'll come to market.

Unusual that the Android version is very thorough and fully-featured, far outshining their iOS efforts to date. That's despite a survey from May 2011 (yes I know, somewhat old but it's the best I could find) that showed only 3% of the questioned physicians using a tablet at all were using an Android tablet while over half used an Apple iPad. It wasn't mentioned what tablets the other 40% were using. 

 

http://www.informationweek.com/byte/personal-tech/science-technology/medical-apps-on-tablets-gain-popularity/232601963

 

EDIT: Somewhat related is a more recent article about the FDA stepping in to regulate medical apps intended for mobile use:

http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/stories/2012/june/27/fda-medical-app-market.aspx

Worth a 2-minute read if you have any interest in med apps, especially developing one.


Edited by Gatorguy - 11/4/12 at 4:44am
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post #57 of 59

I'm in med school and I was waiting for the ipad mini exactly for this reason. I'll get it just before I start my clinical rotations. Do most hospitals now have free wifi throughout the hospital? If not, I'll have to get one with 3g cellular.

post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


A problem with text communication is that sarcasm and mockery gets confused for being defensive. Sometimes sarcasm and mockery is a defense mechanism, but I just laughed.
Haters calling Apple products toys is part of a defense mechanism to minimize and rationalize away Apple's successes.
Apple's movements are often exaggerated versions of what we see on the NASDAQ index. Some of that is because Apple is in the index, but rarely does Apple go down without other stock also going down too. The DJIA is down too. Most of the tech stock I'm watching is down. Google is up by a tiny sliver though.

JeffDM - if you check a year of stock values, Apple is up by around $180ish and Google is up by about $90. I suspect you are right - it is the market not just Apple.

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

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post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhikl View Post

JeffDM - if you check a year of stock values, Apple is up by around $180ish and Google is up by about $90. I suspect you are right - it is the market not just Apple.

At that moment, I meant over a much shorter period of time, a day or two. I think it would be better for everyone if they looked at things over a longer time period a lot more often though.

A common comment that people make is "Apple did X yesterday, that is why they're down today" while completely missing all external influences. This is why I made that previous reply. It is called a post hoc ergo propter hoc argument, and it's a logical fallacy. I will specifically note that amoradala did not make this kind of comment, but I made a note to help clarify a commonly comment.
Edited by JeffDM - 11/11/12 at 8:02pm
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