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VirnetX sues Apple again after winning $368M patent trial verdict - Page 2

post #41 of 79

Amen to everything jragosta has posted so far in this thread.

You are generally very sensible, fair-minded, lucid, and insightful.

Keep up the good work. Those of us who are too tired to counter ignorance and trolling salute you.1smile.gif

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Speaking of trolls, how about the people who don't have any concept of how patent law works who keep making up arguments against "patent trolls".
This has been discussed ad nauseam previously. There is absolutely nothing in US Patent law which requires the inventor to exercise their patent in order to protect it. If there were, small inventors would be out of the game. There are many, many inventions which it would be impossible for a small inventor to practice - so you'd essentially make it impossible for many inventors to profit from their inventions.
Same as a factory owner. If I own a factory that makes widgets and decide not to manufacture widgets for some reason, is it OK for GM or Ford or GE to move into the factory and start making widgets because I'm not using it? Of course not. So why should intellectual property be any different?
Start by learning about patent law. Patents are not about protecting unimpeded sale of a product. Patents are an exclusive right to exercise the invention. If I invent something and then patent it, no one else has the right to use that invention without a license from me. It has absolutely nothing to do with whether I am selling a competing product or not.
post #42 of 79

Yes, found it!

 

 

700

post #43 of 79

No, it's all about the money.  There is no message.

 

They buy up IP for the sole purpose of filing lawsuits. They have no product.  They have no intention of making one.  They are a lawsuit machine.  They always file in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas... that has always been a huge red flag.  Yes, they are the very definition of patent trolls.  

 

It seems we may have some new people here who are not familiar with them and their MO.  It has been going on for many years and those of us who have been around here for a while are very familiar with them and others like them.  It's always the same story.  

 

They don't just go after Apple but pretty much every major player with a lot of cash.  It's just that Apple has been a big target the past few years. 

     197619842014  

     Where were you when the hammer flew?  

 

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     197619842014  

     Where were you when the hammer flew?  

 

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post #44 of 79
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post
Yes, found it!

 

Except for THESE clowns, it's ONLY about the money.

 

Originally Posted by 1984 View Post
They buy up IP for the sole purpose of filing lawsuits.

 

This company does?

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #45 of 79

Patent law is a joke. It needs to be changed so one has to make a product for the patent to be enforceable. If this means small inventors are hurt and put out of business, so be it. This isn't the days of Edison anymore. What do small inventors actually invent these days other than bogus patents to sell to patent troll firms? All this does is drive up the cost of products by legit firms like Apple and Microsoft.

post #46 of 79

Also, China and India should just flat out refuse to recognize US IP laws. They should just copy at will.

post #47 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I wondered the exact same thing a couple months ago and looked it up in Apple's legal documents. Although there is almost no mention of Macintosh on the Apple site, in their Trademarks section there is this:

1. You may not use the Mac trademark standing alone except to denote or refer to the Apple Macintosh product line.

http://www.apple.com/legal/trademark/guidelinesfor3rdparties.html

Also :
In addition to the Mac OS X built-in security features, the  Macintosh Products Guide  contains offerings from third-party providers that could help to increase the security of your system in particular situations.

And this:

Apple Certified Macintosh Technician (ACMT) Certification

http://training.apple.com/certification/acmt


Purchases of an Apple Macintosh computer and a qualifying printer must be made at the U.S. Apple Online Store, an Apple Retail Store located in the U.S...

http://www.apple.com/promo/pdf/L376656M_PrinterPro_PC20_Web_v1.pdf

I guess it still is "Macintosh." You'd think a lawsuit would properly name the products that were infringing.

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post #48 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylack View Post

Also, China and India should just flat out refuse to recognize US IP laws. They should just copy at will.

Should? Don't they already do that?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #49 of 79
Originally Posted by cylack View Post
Also, China and India should just flat out refuse to recognize US IP laws. They should just copy at will.

 

There's zero reason you should think this.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #50 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Except for THESE clowns, it's ONLY about the money.

 

 

This company does?

They want an injuction on these devices. Their message is simple, "steal our ip and we'll go thermonuclear on you". Oh wait someone else said that...

post #51 of 79
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post
They want an injuction on these devices. Their message is simple, "steal our ip and we'll go thermonuclear on you". Oh wait someone else said that...

 

I don't understand what your purpose is in saying this. 


Are you claiming that a company who uses zero patents to make zero products is the same situation as a company who uses hundreds of patents to make dozens of products and who has had their revenue stolen by a company who is somehow magically getting away with the blatant theft of every single imaginable facet of the products they sell? 

 

These situations are similar to you?

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #52 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1984 View Post

No, it's all about the money.  There is no message.

They buy up IP for the sole purpose of filing lawsuits. They have no product.  They have no intention of making one.  They are a lawsuit machine.

So what?

Let's say you inherit a widget factory and you decide that you don't want to make widgets, so you sell the factory to a real estate broker. The broker also doesn't want to make widgets, but they believe they can lease it to someone who will.

Does the fact that the broker is not making widgets give some third party the right to move into the factory and start making widgets? Of course not.

Now, substitute 'patent' for 'widget factory' and you'll see how silly your argument is.

Patents are property. The owner has the right do do whatever they want with it and no one has the right to start using the patented technology without permission. It's that simple.

Now, there is a reasonable argument about that particular court in TX being a problem, but I saw some figures once and it's not as bad as people claim. There are others where patent holders have similar odds of winning. In any event, one bad court does not make the entire patent process invalid. At worst, one might use that court as an argument for changing the rules for venue.
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post #53 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I don't understand what your purpose is in saying this. 


Are you claiming that a company who uses zero patents to make zero products is the same situation as a company who uses hundreds of patents to make dozens of products and who has had their revenue stolen by a company who is somehow magically getting away with the blatant theft of every single imaginable facet of the products they sell? 

 

These situations are similar to you?

 

All I'm saying is people who blatanly copies someone else's invention needs to be held accountable. You have the same views. Somehow the fact that the company doesn't make a product doesn't mean that they shouldn't protect their IP.
post #54 of 79
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post
All I'm saying is people who blatanly copies someone else's invention needs to be held accountable. You have the same views. Somehow the fact that the company doesn't make a product doesn't mean that they shouldn't protect their IP.

 

There's protecting one's IP and then there's "sitting on a patent for 18 years for the sole purpose of dead-legging a company that in the interim has built a successful product which may or may not use it".

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #55 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

I thought the to patent something you had to have very specific details included in the application - not just some vague notion. 

 

But I guess gone are the days when a court decides that BIOS can be reversed engineer provided no one on the reverse engineering team had access to the original designs that created the product which was reverse engineered. 

 

I have no problem with a patent being granted for an idea - but if someone else comes up with an entirely different solution to a problem that appears to be very similar than I don't think that is infringement. 

 

Samsung style copying of an interface element or design is one thing - but in my mind - "establishing a secure connection between one electronic device and another" is not a patentable idea. A specific implementation of that idea should be protected. 

 

I have no idea how many "mouse trap" patents there are (hundreds? thousands?) but "a device used to trap mice" is not the basis for a patent. A specific manner in which a device traps a rodent should be protected - even if that device as described is impossible or prohibitively costly to build and never sees the light of day. I believe there have been patent lawsuits over the type of spring use in a mouse trap as that is what made it unique. And even Thomas Edison was smart enough to patent not the "light bulb" but a particular screw base which made replacing a light bulb simply and effective. 

 

Not sure how much of that applies in software patent suits but it does seem that basis on which patent infringement is determined varies from cases to case and being a highly subjective matter means that such cases aren't going away anytime soon. 

You have actually nailed one of the key problems with the current US patent law. I don't know if yout realize that :-).

 

The basic Idea behind the Patent law was to promote progress and developmemt by giving an inventor a time-limited monopoly IN RETURN for the inventor publishing the invention in sufficient detail for a person skilled in the art to be able to reproduce it.

 

What has happened in the meantime is that the fundamental idea has been turned upside down in many respects and it is actually now the opposite of what is intended. ... being used to BLOCK development and perpetuate monopolies.

 

Many patents are so vaguely formulated that nobody, not even an expert, can decipher what they actually mean. This is no accident. And if an expert thinks he can understand the patents, he is probably seriously wrong unless he is also an expert in patent law. In fact, it has become an art in and of itself to turn a patentable idea into an actual patent application.

 

There are a number of perversions of this problem. For example, it is frequently the case that an idea in and of itself is not patentable, and then some idiot comes along and adds the words "on a computer" and the USPTO and the Patent Appeals court has accepted this with the effect that the non-patentable idea suddenly becomes patentable if it is implemented in software.

 

The story goes on and on. What has been lost is of course that this perversion of purpose is utterly against the public interest.

 

Sad really.

post #56 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

There's protecting one's IP and then there's "sitting on a patent for 18 years for the sole purpose of dead-legging a company that in the interim has built a successful product which may or may not use it".

 

All Apple needed to do was contact them ahead of time and try to set up a deal with them regarding their patent. But they didn't, they went ahead and used their intellectual property without their consent, in the hopes that they wouldn't find out. Same as what happened with the Swiss Clock app. I agree that Virnetx are losers for trolling like this, but they had an idea that they patented, and Apple felt it was good enough to steal. So now Apple needs to pay up.
post #57 of 79
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post
All Apple needed to do was contact them ahead of time…

 

Put the brakes on. It is the responsibility of both parties to FIRST enter into negotiations whenever a patent issue is raised. Not go sue-happy off the cuff. Apple KNEW Samsung was stealing from them. Apple's first course of action was NOT to sue Samsung. Apple wanted to make a deal. Samsung refused, THEN Apple sued.

 

THAT is how you operate. Not like this. VirnetX has no excuses for this behavior.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #58 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post
All Apple needed to do was contact them ahead of time…

 

Put the brakes on. It is the responsibility of both parties to FIRST enter into negotiations whenever a patent issue is raised. Not go sue-happy off the cuff. Apple KNEW Samsung was stealing from them. Apple's first course of action was NOT to sue Samsung. Apple wanted to make a deal. Samsung refused, THEN Apple sued.

 

THAT is how you operate. Not like this. VirnetX has no excuses for this behavior.

Is that a fact :-), then how, may I ask, do you explain Apple's refusal to enter into negotiations on FRAND with Motorola, chosing not to negotiate at all but to sue and try to get a court to impose a one-sided-apple-advantage ?? Apple does not dispute stealing Motorola's IP in this matter, they are just refusing to pay.

 

And remember that line had already been thrown out of court once before (Posner Judgement).

 

Your reality-distortion-field is showing.

post #59 of 79
Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post
Apple does not dispute stealing Motorola's IP in this matter, they are just refusing to pay.

 

Shut up or stop lying. It's a pretty simple concept to understand. You already refuse to have an actual e-mail address, meaning you're obviously just someone who we've already banned. 

 

If our new rule suggestions go through, you'll be out faster than you can make new fake accounts.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #60 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Speaking of trolls, how about the people who don't have any concept of how patent law works who keep making up arguments against "patent trolls".
This has been discussed ad nauseam previously. There is absolutely nothing in US Patent law which requires the inventor to exercise their patent in order to protect it. If there were, small inventors would be out of the game. There are many, many inventions which it would be impossible for a small inventor to practice - so you'd essentially make it impossible for many inventors to profit from their inventions.
Same as a factory owner. If I own a factory that makes widgets and decide not to manufacture widgets for some reason, is it OK for GM or Ford or GE to move into the factory and start making widgets because I'm not using it? Of course not. So why should intellectual property be any different?
Start by learning about patent law. Patents are not about protecting unimpeded sale of a product. Patents are an exclusive right to exercise the invention. If I invent something and then patent it, no one else has the right to use that invention without a license from me. It has absolutely nothing to do with whether I am selling a competing product or not.

There should be a legal obligation for the patent holder to sell a long unused patent, at cost, to a company that will immediately commercialize it, lest consumers be denied or delayed access to valuable technology. In the end, all laws must serve the greater good.
post #61 of 79

I assume that you, as a moderator, can see the email addresses. You could have tested the address and you would have found that it is in fact a real e-mail address. I call you out for lying on that one.

 

As to being someone who has already been banned. That is outright nonsense. I call you out for lying on that. 

 

Regarding the "shut up and stop lying". (sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander :-) )

 

I am not quite sure exactly what you are accusing me of with respect to lying, but I am sure you can be more precise on that if you chose to do so,

 

Regarding the Apple/Motorola FRAND dispute. The public record (ie, court transcripts, judgements and rulings,  and submissions/affadavits of the parties) shows that Apple is not disputing using Motorola FRAND patents without paying. They are not arguing about the usage of the FRAND Patents. They are simply refusing to (a) pay what Motorola suggested (2.5%) (b) enter into negotiations to find a mutually acceptable alternative.

 

Instead, they immediately sued in Wisconsin, trying to get the court to set license fees, and got their claim tossed. That had already happened in Judge Posner's court, albeit with different reasoning, but the same result ... dismissed with prejudice.

 

Among other problems you seem to have is a steadfast refusal or perhaps simply the inability to distinguish between assertions/claims in a litigation, and Facts.

 

In general a party to litigation will naturally attempt to present their case in the best possible light. The opposing party will do the same. The whole point of a court is to adjudicate and to determine (a) the FACTS and (b) what to do in the context of the claims and the facts.

 

For example: Elswhere you say "Apple KNEW" that Samsung was stealing their IP/Design. Apple didn't "Know". Apple ASSERTED something, which is absolutely not necessarily true or a "Fact",  and presented some evidence to support their assertion. With respect to the registered design (in the EU), their claims were rejected in the final instance by the court. In other words, the court found that Apple's claims were false and not supported by the evidence.

 

As far as I am aware, the UK case is the ONLY case that has actually reached final judgement anywhere in the world with respect to Apple's "thermonuclear war". In all other jurisdictions in the US and EU, the cases are still either in the preliminary phase (prior to the initial judgement), or pending appeal. As they say, the show is not over till the fat lady sings.

 

So to present any of the assertions of either party as if they are "FACTS" is simply nonsense ... or if you want to put it in a less polite way, "lies".

 

Returning to the "shut up" part: It may be that it is uncomfortable to you to be confronted with views and opinions that do not match your personal agenda.

It may also be the case that my view of what is "Just" or my ethical values do not correspond to yours. That would not surprise many people. For one thing, it appears that you are an American, and you seem to have a personal agenda. I am more interested in seeing justice done and ethical values maintained, and I am not an american. In fact I am an expat Kiwi living in Germany. (not that that is relevant except to emphasize the point that I probably do not share your cultural values. It is abundantly clear that I don't share your ethical values).

 

I do have a personal agenda : If I feel that either justice is not being done, or if ethical values are being violated, I will call it out, whether you like it or not. It has nothing to do with cool toys or a particular large company. (I work for a large multinational in its EU HQ and I could tell you a thing or two about the machinations of large concerns.)

post #62 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post

I assume that you, as a moderator, can see the email addresses. You could have tested the address and you would have found that it is in fact a real e-mail address. I call you out for lying on that one.

If someone has posted at all on this forum they have used a real email address.

If you mean an email address that is used by someone for more than just verifying an account from this site, then no, no one at AI from the paid employees to the moderators that volunteer their time to help make this community great are privy to how much or often an email account has been used by the person that made in.

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post #63 of 79
So, they are suing Apple again for the same technology for products that were not released during the original suit. It sounds like they can sue Apple again and again for every product Apple releases using the technology, until the cow comes homes. Something just doesn't seem right.
post #64 of 79
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
If someone has posted at all on this forum they have used a real email address.

 

Nope. Huddler doesn't require e-mail verification. Unless ALL of the various utilities I have used to verify e-mail addresses are lying about the status of his e-mail, he signed up with a fake e-mail.


Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post
Apple does not dispute stealing Motorola's IP in this matter, they are just refusing to pay.

 

BLATANT LIES. Simple as that.


Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post

They are simply refusing to (a) pay what Motorola suggested…

 

Funny how that's completely different from what you said before.


Edited by Tallest Skil - 11/11/12 at 11:47am

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #65 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Nope. Huddler doesn't require e-mail verification. Unless ALL of the various utilities I have used to verify e-mail addresses are lying about the status of his e-mail, he signed up with a fake e-mail.

Mea culpa.... and what a horrible downgrade to the forum over vBulletin that will make it tougher on moderators and readers if anyone can sign up without an email address. Email verification is so standard that I never once questioned it when AI made the switch.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #66 of 79
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
Mea culpa.... and what a horrible downgrade to the forum over vBulletin that will make it tougher on moderators and readers if anyone can sign up without an email address. Email verification is so standard that I never once questioned it when AI made the switch.

 

Oh, they have to put one, sure. But "asdjghasuietuwesht7w3y45iwerhlr7srkyw3t5awetia7ysg@a8s8tuaisuugaslfdgueirasdkg.com" is accepted, for example. They can type whatever they want.

 

I would hope, though can't confirm, that it's just a setting that is turned off, but that leads to the question of why something so fundamentally unquestionable is a setting in the first place.

 

I dunno, I certainly suppose the e-mail testing I've done could have all been broken or come back with wrong results, but I tend not to think so. Meaning his vehement denial of lying is all the more ironic.
 

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #67 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
If someone has posted at all on this forum they have used a real email address.

 

Nope. Huddler doesn't require e-mail verification. Unless ALL of the various utilities I have used to verify e-mail addresses are lying about the status of his e-mail, he signed up with a fake e-mail.


Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post
Apple does not dispute stealing Motorola's IP in this matter, they are just refusing to pay.

 

BLATANT LIES. Simple as that.


Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post

They are simply refusing to (a) pay what Motorola suggested…

 

Funny how that's completely different from what you said before.

Crap: Using Patented IP without paying is stealing IP. Wilfully.

 

You could also consider apologising PUBLICALLY for your unethical behaviour re my email address and "previous" accounts. Blatant lies, as you put it.


Edited by Taniwha - 11/11/12 at 1:13pm
post #68 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
Mea culpa.... and what a horrible downgrade to the forum over vBulletin that will make it tougher on moderators and readers if anyone can sign up without an email address. Email verification is so standard that I never once questioned it when AI made the switch.

 

Oh, they have to put one, sure. But "asdjghasuietuwesht7w3y45iwerhlr7srkyw3t5awetia7ysg@a8s8tuaisuugaslfdgueirasdkg.com" is accepted, for example. They can type whatever they want.

 

I would hope, though can't confirm, that it's just a setting that is turned off, but that leads to the question of why something so fundamentally unquestionable is a setting in the first place.

 

I dunno, I certainly suppose the e-mail testing I've done could have all been broken or come back with wrong results, but I tend not to think so. Meaning his vehement denial of lying is all the more ironic.
 

TS, what you have NOT done is attempt to verify the Email address by the simplest of all procedures ... namely to send a manual email to that address.

 

I really think it is intolerable that you are repeatedly abusing your role as moderator.

 

It simply doesn*t wash to try and pretend that its a technical problem. It is not. The mail address is valid and functions regularly, including today where I received email notifications from AI that new comments were present in the forums to which I have contributed.

 

I also think it is totally unethical because the standard users have no possibility to check whether you are being truthful or not.

 

However I do hope that other moderators will take the opportunity to check for themselves simply by writing an email to the address in my profile.

 

I do intend to complain to the editors of AI and refer this issue to them for further action.

 

I would accept a public apology from you in this forum.

 

 

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Edited by Taniwha - 11/11/12 at 2:08pm
post #69 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post

I would accept a public apology from you in this forum.

You want a public apology? WTF?! In that case I want a public apology for having to read your request.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #70 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post

I would accept a public apology from you in this forum.

You want a public apology? WTF?! In that case I want a public apology for having to read your request.

Sorry if you misunderstood. I was offering TS the chance.

 

BTW; I don't know where you get the idea that the forum software doesn't require email verification. That is a load of bs.

 

From the account management screen on AI: (anyone can check it out if they wish to do so)

 

Basic Information

Email Address *

[####]

If you change your email address, we will send a verification email to the new address.
 
 
post #71 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by JiveTurkey View Post

There should be a legal obligation for the patent holder to sell a long unused patent, at cost, to a company that will immediately commercialize it, lest consumers be denied or delayed access to valuable technology. In the end, all laws must serve the greater good.

So in your view, "the greater good" is served by stealing technology from the rightful owner and giving it to someone else?

By that standard, if I own a factory and am not using it, you should be able to move in and start using it. If an author writes a book and doesn't want to publish it, you should be able to take it from them and publish it. If a painter doesn't want to sell his work but rather wants to keep in in a closet, then the government should force him to sell it.

What part of PROPERTY do you not understand?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #72 of 79
I think the entire industry needs to calm the hell down with these patent lawsuits. They only prevent each other from creating the next big thing and move the industry forward. I like to see the big companies form an alliance and truce. As for Virnetx, Apple should pay them and move on to a different technology. I think companies that relies on patent lawsuits for income are the less innovative overtime. Let them drown in their own inventions if they are so great that no one else is using them.

That said, Apple also need to break out of this mold, iPad mini is not groundbreaking. We are starting to see Apple only changing sizes in their product line and spec updates.
post #73 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Put the brakes on. It is the responsibility of both parties to FIRST enter into negotiations whenever a patent issue is raised. Not go sue-happy off the cuff. Apple KNEW Samsung was stealing from them. Apple's first course of action was NOT to sue Samsung. Apple wanted to make a deal. Samsung refused, THEN Apple sued.

 

THAT is how you operate. Not like this. VirnetX has no excuses for this behavior.

 

WRONG, the patent holder has only 1 responsibility, and that is to defend its patent from infringers. There are companies that have patents that they don't license to ANYONE, sometimes because the patent competes with their product and it's more profitable for them to hold onto the patent than to license it. That doesn't mean that anyone should come along and STEAL their patent and start making money off someone else's idea. I don't know why you continue to defend this behavior. Theft is Theft, Apple was caught stealing other people's IP.
post #74 of 79
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post
WRONG, the patent holder has only 1 responsibility, and that is to defend its patent from infringers.

 

So they should go kill the executives at Apple that "stole the patent" so that they can't do it again. 

 

No. That's not their only responsibility.


I don't know why you continue to defend this behavior.

 

Probably because I'm not defending the behavior of IP theft. I'm suggesting behavior for the other party.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #75 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

So in your view, "the greater good" is served by stealing technology from the rightful owner and giving it to someone else?
By that standard, if I own a factory and am not using it, you should be able to move in and start using it. If an author writes a book and doesn't want to publish it, you should be able to take it from them and publish it. If a painter doesn't want to sell his work but rather wants to keep in in a closet, then the government should force him to sell it.
What part of PROPERTY do you not understand?
Your analogies are colorful, but not comparable. While the reality of patent law has allowed all manner of abuses and frivolities, the spirit of the law is intended to serve the interests of the people—not to deny them access to technological advancements. The things you list are material or artistic property. Scientific (technological) knowledge is the rightful property of humanity as a whole, and must not be sequestered.
post #76 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taniwha View Post

Is that a fact :-), then how, may I ask, do you explain Apple's refusal to enter into negotiations on FRAND with Motorola, chosing not to negotiate at all but to sue and try to get a court to impose a one-sided-apple-advantage ?? Apple does not dispute stealing Motorola's IP in this matter, they are just refusing to pay.

 

And remember that line had already been thrown out of court once before (Posner Judgement).

 

Your reality-distortion-field is showing.

 

Motorola sued Apple first.

 

Motorola attempted to rescind the licenses they granted to the companies Apple bought chips from to get around patent exhaustion issues.

 

Apple are not refusing to pay at all, they are willing to pay a "fair and reasonable" amount, such is their right under the agreements which make patented technology part of a standard.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #77 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

Motorola sued Apple first.

 

Motorola attempted to rescind the licenses they granted to the companies Apple bought chips from to get around patent exhaustion issues.

 

Apple are not refusing to pay at all, they are willing to pay a "fair and reasonable" amount, such is their right under the agreements which make patented technology part of a standard.

Then it's unfortunate Apple would not commit to accepting a judge's "fair and reasonable" determination of what that royalty should be. It looked particularly damning when Motorola did commit to accept the judge's royalty order no matter the amount.

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #78 of 79
Would it be cliched if I say, What goes around comes around? A few weeks back we had Apple taking on more Samsung products after it won a $1bn claim. Guess life's after all a circle.
post #79 of 79
Originally Posted by jpadhiyar View Post
Would it be cliched if I say, What goes around comes around?

 

It would just be wrong, is all.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
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