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Apple investigating 'realistic' wireless charging technology

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
A new patent application reveals Apple's interest in a "realistic and practical approach" to wireless power, providing over-the-air electricity to low-power devices within a distance of one meter.

Patent


Apple's interest in wireless charging technology was detailed in a new patent application published this week by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and discovered by AppleInsider. Entitled "Wireless Power Utilization in a Local Computing Environment," it describes a system that would rely on "near-field magnetic resonance" to provide power to nearby devices.

Apple's filing notes that transferring power wirelessly has historically been successful only in fairly limited applications. Specifically, the technology requires a power source and receiver located very close to each other.

This method may be acceptable for devices that require a very small amount of electricity. But Apple says this process is not acceptable for devices that require between a few watts to hundreds of watts.

However, Apple noted that electricity can be transferred from a power source to a receiver within a "near field," or a distance a few times larger than both objects involved in the transfer. In most scenarios, this near field would be about a meter large.

"In this way, a realistic and practical approach to wireless transferring useable amounts of power over distances suitable for limited applications can be realized," the filing reads.

Patent


By adopting wireless charging technology, Apple could minimize or eliminate what it referred to as "unwieldy" existing chargers that must be plugged into the wall.

Apple's system goes one step further than the near field, and aims to improve efficiency when transferring electricity wirelessly. It would also allow a number of peripheral devices to be charged wirelessly within the near field, thanks to "cooperation" between them.

Apple's charging accessory would be able to provide electricity to a number of devices located within the near field, or "virtual charging area." Low-power devices cited by Apple include a mouse and keyboard.

The power supply transmitter could be a stand-alone device, or it could be embedded in an existing device such as a desktop or notebook computer. The transmitter could also be portable, such as a dongle that could be connected to a legacy device via a port like USB.

Peripheral devices would need to be tuned to the appropriate frequency. This would allow them to receive power from the near-field magnetic resonance (or NFMR) power supply.

"The device being brought into the range of the NFMR power supply can communicate its initial presence using a standard communication protocol such as WiFi or Bluetooth," the application reads. "However, once incorporated into the resonance circuit, the device can use a communication back channel."

Apple's application also describes the use of a "re-resonator" that would allow electricity to be wirelessly shared between multiple accessories. In one example, a Mac desktop may not be able to adequately provide power to a wireless mouse because of an obstacle interfering with the connection between the two devices.

"In this case, (the) keyboard can act as a re-resonator such that a portion of the power delivered to (the) keyboard from the NFMR power supply can be passed on by way of a re-resonator transmission unit," the filing states.

Apple's patent filing for a wireless charging system, published this week by the USPTO, was first filed by the company in November of 2010. The proposed invention is credited to Michael F. Culbert, Brett. C. Bilbrey, David I. Simon, and Peter M. Arnold.
post #2 of 39
I'd love to be able to charge my devices wirelessly along with my MBP.
post #3 of 39
I've been predicting this ever since I read about MIT's work in this field on the Ars web site.
Edited by digitalclips - 11/29/12 at 7:09am
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post #4 of 39
Cool. So I could charge my MBP using the "charger" inside my MBP and, uhm...


Joking. ;-)
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #5 of 39
Apple has been investigating this possibility for years. I remember back about the time when the 12" PowerBook came out there were reports about Apple researching how to do this. It would be awesome to have this capability.
post #6 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post

Cool. So I could charge my MBP using the "charger" inside my MBP and, uhm...
Joking. ;-)

You maybe joking but those idiots that create hydrogen (by electrolysis powered from their car batteries) to help get better mileage in their pick up trucks would believe it!
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post #7 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I'd love to be able to charge my devices wirelessly along with my MBP.

The beauty is when Apple get this all working it will be so seamless and automatic we won't even have to think about it. I for one will place my rechargeable batteries and recharging units in the trash can and open a bottle of very old single malt on the day I install such a set up 1smoking.gif

Edit: Oops ... Of course I will dispose of the stuff correctly, driving them to the hazardous waste disposal place in town. Then open the Scotch.
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post #8 of 39

Sweet, wish this would come to market sooner rather than later.  It'd be awesome just to place my iPhone next to my iMac and it charge on it's own.  Or in my vehicle.

post #9 of 39

'realistic' wireless charging technology

 

So the trick is to avoid wireless electrocution 1wink.gif

post #10 of 39
This sounds interesting and all if it in fact sees the light of day. In the meantime, I'd be in favour of Apple tastefully building a dock into the wired extended keyboard, but that's just me.
post #11 of 39
The thing I find amusing about all the "wireless power" solutions going around lately is that they all use giant magnetic fields to achieve it, when back in the early days of computing everyone was certain that these same fields were going to kill us all and make us get cancer.

I worked in a computer lab in the mid 1980's and we had expensive "magnetic field inverters" placed all over the lab, one by each computer so that the magnetic fields generated by the computers (which apparently were rotating the "wrong" way), could be turned inside out and thus "neutralised."

All total poppycock of course, but we spent several hundred dollars a piece for those inverters and people would leave the lab when they failed so as to protect themselves from the evil, untamed magnetic fields in the lab.

The parallels between this and the current situation with cell phone radiation is interesting too. Apparently giant magnetic fields going through your body are fine now but cell radiation will now give you the same cancer the 1980's computers couldn't manage to.

I wonder if people will still be terrified of cell phone radiation ten years from now or if it will be another new thing instead?
post #12 of 39
Those talking about charging devices might want to dial back the cheering. They are talking about low power devices. So basically your computer charging your wireless keyboard, mouse and trackpad. NOT something like an iPhone, iPad etc. that is still way off to perhaps never

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #13 of 39
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post
Those talking about charging devices might want to dial back the cheering. They are talking about low power devices. So basically your computer charging your wireless keyboard, mouse and trackpad. NOT something like an iPhone, iPad etc. that is still way off to perhaps never

 

They're already powering TVs wirelessly. "Never" is a silly word in tech.

Originally Posted by helia

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Originally Posted by helia

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post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by z3r0 View Post

'realistic' wireless charging technology

 

So the trick is to avoid wireless electrocution 1wink.gif

 

yes... all I could think of was a tesla coil

 

post #15 of 39
Don't see this happening any time soon. In order not to waste electricity the transmitter would have to know where the receiver is and transmit the current directly too it. This isn't a wireless router.
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Don't see this happening any time soon. In order not to waste electricity the transmitter would have to know where the receiver is and transmit the current directly too it. This isn't a wireless router.

You should read about the MIT development on this, they pretty much solved that issue and many others from what we were taught in physics lessons decades ago. I believe the guys behind this company are MIT alumni

http://www.witricity.com/pages/faq.html
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post #17 of 39

Just a patent among thousands. Interesting to explore, though.

 

You know what’s more “unwieldy” than existing chargers? Wireless charging bricks! Sounds like this would be no exception: longer distance, but the same problem that plagues current wireless charging system: instead of a cable and a charger brick... wireless systems use a cable and a BIGGER brick! (Or pad etc.)

 

Would be neat to have by your couch or desk or someplace you often sit—even if it was an optional secondary charging method, and not the main method used all the time (and thus carried around).

post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I'd love to be able to charge my devices wirelessly along with my MBP.

This is all about low power devices. Note the stress on realistic!
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

 

yes... all I could think of was a tesla coil

 

NO KIdding.  The thing that raises my concern is with the speculation with this potentially causing cancer.  Some people think that cell phones can cause cancer, and that's not transmitting the ability to charge a battery.  I'm just wondering if this is really a good method for charging a battery.

 

What technology Apple was also working on is the motion causing the battery to trickle charge, much like a Rolex watch. THAT would be cool if they could make it where enough movement of the mobile device would create enough trickle charge to keep longer battery life.  I could see that for smartphones since we walk a lot potentially creating enough movement throughout the day to maybe accomplish this.

 

WIreless charging, to me, seems more like a great demo type technology, but practically not worth it.  We still have to plug something into the wall and with wireless charging, it would seem that whatever we plug into the wall will be significantly larger than the iPhone plug, which is pretty darned small.

post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

The thing I find amusing about all the "wireless power" solutions going around lately is that they all use giant magnetic fields to achieve it, when back in the early days of computing everyone was certain that these same fields were going to kill us all and make us get cancer.
I worked in a computer lab in the mid 1980's and we had expensive "magnetic field inverters" placed all over the lab, one by each computer so that the magnetic fields generated by the computers (which apparently were rotating the "wrong" way), could be turned inside out and thus "neutralised."
All total poppycock of course, but we spent several hundred dollars a piece for those inverters and people would leave the lab when they failed so as to protect themselves from the evil, untamed magnetic fields in the lab.
The parallels between this and the current situation with cell phone radiation is interesting too. Apparently giant magnetic fields going through your body are fine now but cell radiation will now give you the same cancer the 1980's computers couldn't manage to.
I wonder if people will still be terrified of cell phone radiation ten years from now or if it will be another new thing instead?


Good thing cancer is a thing of the past indeed. It would have been a shame to lose someone as talented as SJ from such an avoidable fate.

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post #21 of 39
I have to see that in action.

Hello Tesla...
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post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Don't see this happening any time soon. In order not to waste electricity the transmitter would have to know where the receiver is and transmit the current directly too it. This isn't a wireless router.

 

Or they just inundate the whole room and make it the iCeiling.  Sounds safe.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


Would be neat to have by your couch or desk

Introducing the Apple iCouch, iDesk and iSwimmingPool?

Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

 my concern is with the speculation with this potentially causing cancer.

I'd think that exposing a body to a huge amount of energy will cause issues. After all, that's how gamma-ray induced DNA mutations work...

Then again, I'm no scientist.

 

 

----

Also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOpBPXLsNrs

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post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

The thing I find amusing about all the "wireless power" solutions going around lately is that they all use giant magnetic fields to achieve it, when back in the early days of computing everyone was certain that these same fields were going to kill us all and make us get cancer.

I worked in a computer lab in the mid 1980's and we had expensive "magnetic field inverters" placed all over the lab, one by each computer so that the magnetic fields generated by the computers (which apparently were rotating the "wrong" way), could be turned inside out and thus "neutralised."
That wasn't a government run lab was it?

I only ask because the people that are easiest to exploit with this nonsense are the ones that don't have any financial responsibility.
Quote:
All total poppycock of course, but we spent several hundred dollars a piece for those inverters and people would leave the lab when they failed so as to protect themselves from the evil, untamed magnetic fields in the lab.
That is really sad. I'm assuming the "labs" had rather intelligent people in them. In a way I guess it doesn't matter, smart people often aren't rational people.

By the way how did they know when the devices failed? I could imagine a circuit in the device designed to randomly fail after being turned on for awhile. Such a circuit would be there to generate new sales.

Back in the day we had a system that used DEC terminals. Of course those where the days of service contracts and the like. The terminals would always fail in a specific manner resulting in the generated service call. I came to believe that the problem was an engineered in failure mode to encourage the purchasing of service contracts.
Quote:
The parallels between this and the current situation with cell phone radiation is interesting too. Apparently giant magnetic fields going through your body are fine now but cell radiation will now give you the same cancer the 1980's computers couldn't manage to.
Cell phones are an entirely different beast. The problem is finding good ethical research that isn't being exploited for special interests. RF radiation can be a health problem when the power levels are high enough, this is well known and is of special concern around sensitive tissue like the eyes. The problem is generally several orders of magnitude difference in power levels. There have been no reliable papers written on the health effects of the extremely low power levels seen in cell phones.
Quote:
I wonder if people will still be terrified of cell phone radiation ten years from now or if it will be another new thing instead?
There will always be a new thing. Some people seem to have an innate desire to exploit their fellow man and as such can always turn a new tech into something evil. On the flip side you have the sorts of people that simply can't deal with the mainstream science of the day and gravitate towards the fringe. If not the existing fringe they fabricate a new fringe. God help you if you try to show them reason. I had this problem with a girl friend years ago and we seemed to have a mass failure of reason during the last election. Not to bring politics into the discussion but at times I saw the same sort of disconnect from reality in voters.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

They're already powering TVs wirelessly. "Never" is a silly word in tech.

His comment is valid as stated. He did qualify it with the word perhaps.

Take for example, FW. If two years ago he stated that we'll perhaps never see FW1600 or FW3200 many would have likely disagreed as FW1600 and FW3200 were being developed. As it turns out such Thunderbolt is replacing FW because it has many intrinsic benefits over FW thus obsolescing that tech.

Wireless charging is a different beast because we have to consider many other factors that a data connector doesn't have to deal with. In the 120-ish years since wireless power has been tested it's never really come to fruition. The closest we have are inductive charging for small devices but they are limited in many ways. I don't see offering it until those limitations are negated somewhat.

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post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilbo63 View Post

This sounds interesting and all if it in fact sees the light of day. In the meantime, I'd be in favour of Apple tastefully building a dock into the wired extended keyboard, but that's just me.

It sounds interesting - until you start looking at efficiency.

Existing wireless systems can achieve efficiencies of up to about 90% (more typically 40-60%), but they only get that much efficiency because the devices are in very close proximity. The energy level decreases as the cube of the distance, so increasing the distance between the charger and the device greatly reduces the efficiency.

Now, as an individual, it isn't that big a deal if you have to spend $5 per year charging your phone instead of $0.40. But when you add up all the energy wasted by 100 million devices, it becomes substantial. One estimate I did earlier indicated that even more conventional wireless charging would waste the equivalent of one GW scale power plant (with all the pollution and cost that entails). Moving the device even further from the device would increase that.

It's just not that big a deal to plug the phone in.
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post #26 of 39
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
His comment is valid as stated. He did qualify it with the word perhaps.

 

I'm just taking the perhaps out of the equation, is all.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I've been predicting this ever since I read about MIT's work in this field on the Ars web site.
I've been predicting this since I first learned about Nikola Tesla ...

We'd have wireless power transmission today if not for Edison and Westinghouse.

Fortunately Apple doesn't have to worry about infringing Tesla's expired patents.
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I'm just taking the perhaps out of the equation, is all.

It's a perhaps the best qualifier because it makes it clear that "one does not wish to be too definite or assertive in the expression of an opinion."

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post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

I'd think that exposing a body to a huge amount of energy will cause issues. After all, that's how gamma-ray induced DNA mutations work...
Then again, I'm no scientist.
I'm not a scientist either but have a tiny bit of background in RF systems. First off gamma ray radiation is ionizing radiation which is not the same thing as the RF radiation we are talking about here. I'm not up to speed on nuclear sciences so we can skip that part of the discussion.

RF energy becomes harmful when it can significantly heat body tissue this normally involves very high power levels. At least very high with respect to a cell phone. The eyes also have a sensitivity to high power RF radiators.

The thing here is we are not even certain if this is an RF radiating device. The use of magnetics seems to imply lower frequencies but honestly I don't have the details. However the details don't really matter as where ever there are electrical machinery there are magnetic fields. At times these fields can be very intense and even so there has been nothing demonstrated that such fields cause cancer. Think about people working in modern factories surrounded by electrical motors and other devices. Effectively we are talking about huge amounts of energy but none of it causes harm.
Quote:

post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


It sounds interesting - until you start looking at efficiency.

Existing wireless systems can achieve efficiencies of up to about 90% (more typically 40-60%), but they only get that much efficiency because the devices are in very close proximity. The energy level decreases as the cube of the distance, so increasing the distance between the charger and the device greatly reduces the efficiency.

Now, as an individual, it isn't that big a deal if you have to spend $5 per year charging your phone instead of $0.40. But when you add up all the energy wasted by 100 million devices, it becomes substantial. One estimate I did earlier indicated that even more conventional wireless charging would waste the equivalent of one GW scale power plant (with all the pollution and cost that entails). Moving the device even further from the device would increase that.

It's just not that big a deal to plug the phone in.

This is perhaps the biggest issue with wireless charging solutions and frankly would be reason enough to make them illegal through legislation. Think about it Bush banned the conventional light bulb due to wasted energy and frankly with good reason. Here we have manufactures trying to introduce systems that are clearly wasters of energy, potentially to the same level as those light bulbs. I can see such products having a rough time if Washington became focused on the environment and other real issues. If not banned the hardware may be required to maintain specific efficiency levels. This then would revert most systems to devices that are almost in contact.

I'm actually surprised that such systems have effectively flown under the radar of the environmentalists. They always find totally stupid things to whine about but here they have a chance to impact something that will be extremely wasteful if its use becomes wide spread.
post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanada View Post

iTunes 11 hit at 10am Nov. 29. Downloading it now!!! 1biggrin.gif

Link?

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post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Link?

Just launch Apps Store. I'm downloading now.
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post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

You should read about the MIT development on this, they pretty much solved that issue and many others from what we were taught in physics lessons decades ago. I believe the guys behind this company are MIT alumni
http://www.witricity.com/pages/faq.html

Witricity doesn't change the laws of physics. They even state:
"Maximum efficiency is achieved when the devices are relatively close to one another, and can exceed 95%."

As soon as you increase the distance, the efficiency drops off - by the cube of the distance.

Furthermore, their 95% claim has never been independently verified, nor have they stated under what conditions it applies. Maybe if the receiver totally encloses the transmitter, but not in the real world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

This is perhaps the biggest issue with wireless charging solutions and frankly would be reason enough to make them illegal through legislation. Think about it Bush banned the conventional light bulb due to wasted energy and frankly with good reason. Here we have manufactures trying to introduce systems that are clearly wasters of energy, potentially to the same level as those light bulbs. I can see such products having a rough time if Washington became focused on the environment and other real issues. If not banned the hardware may be required to maintain specific efficiency levels. This then would revert most systems to devices that are almost in contact.
I'm actually surprised that such systems have effectively flown under the radar of the environmentalists. They always find totally stupid things to whine about but here they have a chance to impact something that will be extremely wasteful if its use becomes wide spread.

I suspect the reason is twofold:
1. Until recently, the amount of energy wasted was insignificant. Not that many people have wireless charging devices.

2. A lack of understanding of the science involved - and how much efficiency is lost.

That said, the waste is nothing like the light bulb. First, there are literally billions of light bulbs in use. Second, light bulbs waste something like 90% of the energy they use while a good wireless charging system of the type currently in use (where the receiver is essentially in contact with the transmitter) only loses about 40-60%.
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post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by z3r0 View Post

'realistic' wireless charging technology

 

So the trick is to avoid wireless electrocution 1wink.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Apparently giant magnetic fields going through your body are fine now but cell radiation will now give you the same cancer the 1980's computers couldn't manage to.
I wonder if people will still be terrified of cell phone radiation ten years from now or if it will be another new thing instead?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post
Would be neat to have by your couch or desk or someplace you often sit

 

There's already plenty of debate about the safety or potential lack of same, some of which is above my pay grade.  But yes, while people will always be concerned about the possible effects of dispersing new technology in new places, and some overly to hysterically so, I personally wouldn't want to leave this thing on all night near the head of my bed.  Just in case, I'm just sayin'.....

...also computing and the internet are already using a really notable amount of all the electricity produced on earth, so a 40-60% "wastage" of energy dissipated that's charging nothing may mean little when we're talking about a few or even a few million such losses, but scale that up to billions (of iDevices, KB's, Mice, etc.) and you're talking about a whole lotta wasted watts (and the resources to produce 'em) for a relatively small return in convenience....

...when it comes it comes, but I'm not salivating over any "transformative" effect this would have on my life....

 

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post #35 of 39
Hope they call it Tesla or something like that.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new patent application reveals Apple's interest in a "realistic and practical approach" to wireless power, providing over-the-air electricity
 


However, Apple noted that electricity can be transferred from a power source to a receiver within a "near field," or a distance a few times larger than both objects involved in the transfer.


Apple's system goes one step further than the near field, and aims to improve efficiency when transferring electricity wirelessly.


Apple's charging accessory would be able to provide electricity to a number of devices located within the near field, or "virtual charging area." 

Nowhere does the patent talk about "transferring electricity" wirelessly or over the air because that is not what this patent is about.

In fact, it specifically states it is magnetic, not electric.

 

"In the exemplary embodiments of the invention, magnetic type antennas such as single and multi-turn loop antennas are used for both transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antenna systems since magnetic near-field amplitudes tend to be higher for magnetic type antennas in comparison to the electric near-fields of an electric-type antenna (e.g., a small dipole)."


Edited by Chris_CA - 11/29/12 at 5:03pm
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

You should read about the MIT development on this, they pretty much solved that issue and many others from what we were taught in physics lessons decades ago. I believe the guys behind this company are MIT alumni
http://www.witricity.com/pages/faq.html

Witricity doesn't change the laws of physics. They even state:
"Maximum efficiency is achieved when the devices are relatively close to one another, and can exceed 95%."

As soon as you increase the distance, the efficiency drops off - by the cube of the distance.

Furthermore, their 95% claim has never been independently verified, nor have they stated under what conditions it applies. Maybe if the receiver totally encloses the transmitter, but not in the real world.

 

You are perhaps restricting your analysis to radiating systems rather than coupled systems. In a resonant inductive system the transfer power will decrease with distance as the field strength at the secondary decreases, but the efficiency (in the magnetic near field), which depends on both the source Q-factor and the field strength, can remain high.

 

Also, even for a radiative (EM) system the field strength at worst goes inversely with the square of the distance, and with a dipole antenna, inversely with distance.

post #38 of 39
I predicted Apple to have a technology just like this this year(during march, by December), I also predected In about 10 years, Apple would come out with between 30 and 300 foot( varying prediction) of a wireless charging with a transmitter the size of a headphone jack(exc. wall plug) would be the power source, charging a device(min. Limit a iPod shuffle but hoping at least IPhone with macs coming 3-5 years after, and yet that would match the ten years of the now lighting adapter, I may have a new future tech perfection in 48 hours( may not reveal it , I've had it for over a month, obviously less developed, and lets watch you freak when it's true just wait and see.
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Not to bring politics into the discussion but at times I saw the same sort of disconnect from reality in voters.

The problem with politics is, everyone thinks he's right.

 

Like people who thinks any (important) political guy in the US is even remotely on the left side of the political spectrum. Talk about "disconnect from reality".

When I see people saying that Obama's a leftist/socialist I laugh my butt off, he's more to the right than Reagan ever was.

 

My feeling, which only is worth what it's worth, is that in a few centuries, people will either be extinct, in the dark ages, or think that the current United States suffered a lot from the plutocratic system (justified by the myth that "you get what you deserve/work for", because "In God We Trust" -- not a theocracy at all) instead of a hard-data scientific democratic system.

 

 

But it's politics, and I'm pretty sure you entirely disagree with that, which you're entitled to do (but won't convince me you're then not "disconnected from reality").

 

 

Also, about the phone-induced cancers, courts have ruled that phones have caused cancer. It's now a settled debate, and no amount of corporate FUD can make time go back: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/19/italy-phones-idUSL5E8LJFFW20121019 (but I guess some here are still sore about Italy upholding its laws against Apple -- but are perfectly ok with the US upholding theirs against Samsung, go figure).

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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