or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple requires its own tests to ensure carrier LTE networks are up to snuff
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple requires its own tests to ensure carrier LTE networks are up to snuff

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Apple will only allow a carrier to offer the iPhone 5 on their LTE network after the company conducts its own tests of the wireless service, one carrier has revealed.

Apple's strict quality control methods were revealed to Telecoms.com (via The Next Web) by a spokesperson for Swisscom. They indicated that Apple will only enable 4G LTE access on the iPhone 5 after testing the device on a carrier's live, working network.

Swisscom launched its LTE 4G network this week, but Apple's iPhone 5 is not yet able to run on the carrier's network. That's because Apple must push out an update enabling the LTE connectivity.

Apple is expected to provide users of Swisscom with a software update to enable LTE connectivity in "due course," but a timeframe has not yet been given.

The strict control maintained by Apple "shocked" Bengt Nordstrom, head of an industry consultancy group named NorthStream. In a conversation with Telecoms.com, he said carriers' willingness to concede such control to Apple shows "who is running the industry."

iPhone 5


Apple gave the press and members of the public a glimpse at its extensive retesting testing process in 2010 in response to the so-called "antenna-gate" that surrounded the launch of the iPhone 4. In a video posted on its website, Apple showed off an inside look at its antenna design and test labs, while members of the press were also given a tour of the facilities.

"Apple has invested more than $100 million building its advanced antenna design and test labs," the company said in 2010. "Our engineers have logged thousands of hours designing and testing iPhone 4 in these state-of-the-art facilities."

While Apple has shown its extensive in-house testing, the information from Swisscom shows that the company also takes seriously its carrier partners' ability to offer customers the expected level of performance from their LTE networks.
post #2 of 18
Makes me wonder if they've disabled LTE on my 5 as there is no LTE where I live, apart from a small testing area. Fortunately the license has been auctioned in the end of October, but that doesn't mean we'll get LTE in the next couple o' months. Especially considering our crappy telcos over here in The Netherlands.
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
Reply
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
Reply
post #3 of 18

As opposed to manufacturers of Android phones which could care less about the quality of their product and are more concerned with market share.

post #4 of 18
I can't image Apple not doing this testing. If they promise certain functionality, and put it in their advertising, guess who gets sued if the functionality they promised isn't available? Apple has lost several legal suits just on this point just this year.

Then Apple has a contract with the providers, and I would suspect the providers must deliver what they promised to Apple under their contract. Again, due diligence says test and verify.

Apple has also experienced less than ideal performance on some providers' network. Best for Apple to verify and/or discover and fix before having to deal with the downside of their iPhone not performing up to standards.
post #5 of 18
So. The carriers are shocked that they're not in the driver's seat? After years of creating their own walled stores, branded services, locked down SIM cards, limited firmware updates, and custom phones preloaded with carrier-specific shovelware, they're shocked that Apple is raising the bar and requiring them to live up to it?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #6 of 18
I am with Apple. Why do this Nordstrom dude be shocked. The tighter the ship the smooth it will sail, PERIOD
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Makes me wonder if they've disabled LTE on my 5 as there is no LTE where I live, apart from a small testing area. Fortunately the license has been auctioned in the end of October, but that doesn't mean we'll get LTE in the next couple o' months. Especially considering our crappy telcos over here in The Netherlands.

 

Disabling would be network wide, not just in your area. So if the carrier's network can pass Apple's test in an "available" area, then it would not be disabled on your iPhone. Mobile phones are, mobile, so you may move around and visit an area where you could access LTE.

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
post #8 of 18
They doing this to avoid the embarrassment like in Australia when their 4g iPad did not work on the local network. They tried to smooth the fault over by saying Australia's 3g network is as fast as 4g in the US. The competition board did not agree and they had to offer refunds to those that wanted and admit the error. So according to Apple getting a hand job is the same as being laid....nice try.

So now they covering their bases by disabling a feature instead of integrating a radio that supports more variations. It's like having a fast
car with the handbrake on
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

So. The carriers are shocked that they're not in the driver's seat? After years of creating their own walled stores, branded services, locked down SIM cards, limited firmware updates, and custom phones preloaded with carrier-specific shovelware, they're shocked that Apple is raising the bar and requiring them to live up to it?

The article is spun to a degree, although I agree with you on shovelware. The reality is the testing may reveal problems on either side. What's important is that it works.

post #10 of 18
Without a decent LTE Network , a constant switching between 3G and 4G will significantly reduce battery life. And when this happen my guess is that 90% of users will complain iPhone 5 having less then satisfactory battery life rather then the Network's operator fault.

There are only two kind of people in this world.

Those who dont understand Apple and those who misunderstood Apple.

Reply

There are only two kind of people in this world.

Those who dont understand Apple and those who misunderstood Apple.

Reply
post #11 of 18
Does not read right. You can't test a network until you have enough people using it. Catch 22.
post #12 of 18
But yes it does read that LTE will never work on other networks unless they sell the iPhone ad/or pass Apple's tests ! Fee time methinks. And yes, it will ever work on the current incompatible LTE networks anyway.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by petrosy View Post

They doing this to avoid the embarrassment like in Australia when their 4g iPad did not work on the local network. They tried to smooth the fault over by saying Australia's 3g network is as fast as 4g in the US. The competition board did not agree and they had to offer refunds to those that wanted and admit the error.

So according to Apple getting a hand job is the same as being laid....nice try.

...

LOL, all depends on which side you are on "him" or "her"...
Edited by haar - 12/1/12 at 6:16am
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

You didn't pay $300 for the phone. You paid $300 plus many hundreds more for your contract to get a subsidized phone.
That aside, if the phone was damaged, you should have exchanged it. It's not Apple's fault you were too lazy to do so.

I seriously doubt the poster actually bought the iPhone 5. A real customer would've exchanged it, and solved their own problem instead using "scratch-gate" to argue that Apple doesn't have quality control. I had an iPhone 3GS fail under warranty, took it to the genius bar, and got it exchanged in under ten minutes. Apple took care of the problem impressively fast. A real Apple customer would know how to get happy. A concern troll is not interested in solving anything, just attacking Apple.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #15 of 18
It still reads as being a positive tie in for those networks with Apple contracts and not exactly positive news for us the customer. At the end of the contract, if LTE options are limited then customer retention is more likely.
post #16 of 18

Interestingly if you visit the Swisscom site it is advertising the Note 2 alongside its ultra fast LTE.

When viewing the iPHone 5 it says "Apple will provide a software update with the iPhone 5 to allow the use of 4G (LTE). Swisscom customers will be notified as soon as the new software is available. "

 

I am sort of wondering if Apple are working on fix to improve the speeds.

Some tests in London had the S3 data speed immensely faster than the iPhone 5 on EEs LTE. 

Good old Apple, their doings always create mystery

post #17 of 18

The strict control maintained by Apple "shocked" Bengt Nordstrom, head of an industry consultancy group named NorthStream. In a conversation with Telecoms.com, he said carriers' willingness to concede such control to Apple shows "who is running the industry."

 

 

Sounds familiar to what happened in the ebook industry.

How soon can we see a cell phone antitrust lawsuit against apple?

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply
post #18 of 18

They're not doing a good job if they are testing it because LTE is basically useless for me.  I work in NYC, live in metro NJ and frequently commute for work to LA and SF.  I frequently have my phone say LTE but it rarely has any usable internet connectivity even with full bars on AT&T.  The problem isn't reception quality it's that their network is so over subscribed relative to its capacity that is frequently doesn't give me any ping even when I have strong signal.  I would say that's true more than 50% of the time.  Rendering high speed useless because it's not reliable.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Apple requires its own tests to ensure carrier LTE networks are up to snuff
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple requires its own tests to ensure carrier LTE networks are up to snuff