or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Apple will invest $100M to produce one line of Macs in the US in 2013
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple will invest $100M to produce one line of Macs in the US in 2013 - Page 2

post #41 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

While some of you guys keep talking about the Mac Pro, you need to be reminded that it's iMacs that are coming with the assembled in USA stamps.

 

Sure, but pick another product in the Mac lineup that has such low volumes that the ENTIRE production can be done in the US.

 

It isn't the iMac unless Apple expects iMac sales to crater.

post #42 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by argonaut View Post

 

Why??

 

I suppose possibly more Mac's are sold in the US than outside, but 'most' ?

 

Yes.  That and these are probably most used in video/graphics production houses followed by research universities.

post #43 of 104

The haters will have to find something else to bitch about.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply
post #44 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

The haters will have to find something else to bitch about.

 

It's Apple.  I have full confidence in the haters to find things to gripe about.  Heck, I'm a Kentucky WIldcats fan.  We dropped out of teh Top 25 this week and after 4000 comments on the article at ESPN, most of them were from people hating on or defending Kentucky.  When you're a target, you stay a target no matter what

post #45 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

"Congratulations to Apple for doing this, the public will appreciate it."
Pure baloney. The public will ignore American made Macs if they are even five dollars more than the foreign made Macs. This pie-in-the-sky, feel good, made-in-America crap is shear political pablum. The theory has been discredited over and over again in the clothing and electronics world.
The only people who will appreciate it are the activists and talking head pundits. This is a political move by Apple only.

I agree. While its nice that Apple is at least trying, I see it more as an experiment in goodwill than anything else.

Most people here only have a 5-minute attention span. They wont care. Watch them complain if those iMacs cost a little more.
post #46 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post


It depends on many factors such as margin, QA, design and process (e.g., whether robots are involved)

 

I think the main factor is whether American workers are involved.  1smile.gif

 

On another note though, I don't see anyone mentioning this so I'll just throw it out there ... what's to stop them from bankrolling an American plant for Foxconn?  

 

They are already in Brazil.  It would seem the most likely choice to me.  There is pretty much no difference between Foxconn operating a plant in China or Brazil and Foxconn operating a plant in the USA other than being under a bit more government surveillance and the vastly higher wages.  

post #47 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Having one, I can tell you that the Mac Pro is easily the most complex of all Macs by far. The case is very complex. You obviously haven't seen one if you think the case and electronics are simple.

 

Even if you have seen one, they make it look simple.

post #48 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

I can see the MacPro's easily made in the US, since they can probably be done with robots due to the simplicity of the actual case and electronics

I agree that robots are the most likely solution and that the Mac Pro being low volume is the most likely candidate, but the idea that the Mac Pro case's "simplicity" is a factor sounds just plain silly to me.  

 

The iMac is a simpler design with fewer components, so is the Mac mini and all of the iOS devices too.  The Mac Pro in it's current iteration, is both heavy and complicated and not as well suited to assembly line production as the other things they make IMO.  

post #49 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I think the main factor is whether American workers are involved.  1smile.gif

 

On another note though, I don't see anyone mentioning this so I'll just throw it out there ... what's to stop them from bankrolling an American plant for Foxconn?  

Pegatron is building these in Fremont,  Pegatron is building these in Fremont, Pegatron is building these in Fremont. . .

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #50 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post


That's probably because those products are commodity. People do care about fashion done in Italy and pay a premium for them. For the US Mac, they will have to figure out its selling point and make sure people lust after it. Apple is one of the few companies with enough margin to execute this move on a sustainable basis.

 

I disagree.  All computers are "commodity" products in the sense that you use it here, and the ones that the public "lusts" for are the high volume ones like iPhone that will never be produced in the USA.  Also, the concept of "having enough margin" to do something like this really means "having enough margin to blow" on something like this.  Apple would have to be prepared to throw away margin on what you yourself describe as their premiere product and I don't see that happening.  Apple makes an absolutely *huge* markup on all it's products and it doesn't drop it even on high volume sales, (see iPhone), let alone low volume specialty products with higher production costs.  

post #51 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Pegatron is building these in Fremont,  Pegatron is building these in Fremont, Pegatron is building these in Fremont. . .

 

Who's building them where now? 

post #52 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Who's building them where now? 

1biggrin.gif

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #53 of 104

Awesome news, props to Cook for making it happen.  I've been harsh on some of his decisions lately, but this move more than makes up for the bad ones.  If this production line is successful, Apple will likely move even more production over here.  

 

Most important IMO was Cook's comment that Apple has a responsibility to bring jobs to the US.  If only more CEOs thought this way.  We have Jobs to thank for putting Cook in his place, but I don't think Jobs would have agreed with Cook on this move.  

post #54 of 104
Originally Posted by Lerxt View Post
Congratulations to Apple for doing this, the public will appreciate it.

 

Nope.

 

Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post
It's Apple.

 

You've summed up the entire argument of the Anti-Apple Brigade. Regardless of their faction.


Originally Posted by Junkyard Dawg View Post

…I don't think Jobs would have agreed with Cook on this move.  

 

I don't think you have any place to say anything in that capacity, but you know. It was Cook's decision to move overseas in the first place.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #55 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I disagree.  All computers are "commodity" products in the sense that you use it here, and the ones that the public "lusts" for are the high volume ones like iPhone that will never be produced in the USA.  Also, the concept of "having enough margin" to do something like this really means "having enough margin to blow" on something like this.  Apple would have to be prepared to throw away margin on what you yourself describe as their premiere product and I don't see that happening.  Apple makes an absolutely *huge* markup on all it's products and it doesn't drop it even on high volume sales, (see iPhone), let alone low volume specialty products with higher production costs.  

 

Never is a long time.  All it would take is a few seismic shifts in the world economy to bring production back to the US.  While I agree this is highly improbable, that's a long ways from impossible.  

 

The idea that Apple are "blowing" their margins on this move is just silly.  There isn't enough info in that article to make such a claim.

 

 

 

Quote:
The iMac is a simpler design with fewer components, so is the Mac mini and all of the iOS devices too.  The Mac Pro in it's current iteration, is both heavy and complicated and not as well suited to assembly line production as the other things they make IMO.  

 

All Apple products are made on assembly lines.  

 

One advantage of moving now is that Apple won't have Jobs insisting on painting all the robots, lol.

 

post #56 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I don't think you have any place to say anything in that capacity, but you know. It was Cook's decision to move overseas in the first place.

 

Especially after the NeXT factory being said to have been Jobs' baby.

 

Moving some capability back is both just a publicity move AND a act of corporate responsibility to the country it was founded in.  Just like the solar and fuel cell capacity at the NC data center.  Both publicity for greening and an act of good corporate stewardship.

 

Companies like that should be rewarded.  Otherwise you get results like Walmart.

post #57 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I disagree.  All computers are "commodity" products in the sense that you use it here, and the ones that the public "lusts" for are the high volume ones like iPhone that will never be produced in the USA.  Also, the concept of "having enough margin" to do something like this really means "having enough margin to blow" on something like this.  Apple would have to be prepared to throw away margin on what you yourself describe as their premiere product and I don't see that happening.  Apple makes an absolutely *huge* markup on all it's products and it doesn't drop it even on high volume sales, (see iPhone), let alone low volume specialty products with higher production costs.  

You are assuming that they can only make the computer at one place. When volume picks up and competition jumps in, they can always set up production elsewhere to back it up.

While Apple doesn't lower its price when it has high margin, it does not mean they can't explore US as a manufacturing site. The high margin allows them to try new stuff while the PC makers generally have to pick existing tech and processes.

Obviously there has to be demand and economics to sustain the move in the long run.

In the post I replied to, he used commodity goods like clothing to support his argument that people will always buy the cheapest. I am just pointing out that there are non-commodity, premium clothing lines that people lust after that can be made else where. The same applies here. There can be commoditized items and there can be specialty, high value items.
post #58 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Especially after the NeXT factory being said to have been Jobs' baby.

Moving some capability back is both just a publicity move AND a act of corporate responsibility to the country it was founded in.  Just like the solar and fuel cell capacity at the NC data center.  Both publicity for greening and an act of good corporate stewardship.

Companies like that should be rewarded.  Otherwise you get results like Walmart.

I don't think it's merely a publicity move. They have been working on it for a few years, including assembling some of the standard iMacs here.

We will probably hear more about their manufacturing process later. They also hope to see other companies take up similar approach where it makes sense.

It is also aligned with government interest to bring their overseas money back in meaningful ways, and generate jobs.
post #59 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkyard Dawg View Post

The idea that Apple are "blowing" their margins on this move is just silly.  There isn't enough info in that article to make such a claim.

 

Agree.  This idea that Tim Cook is going to build a factory that's not profitable is laughable; it's not in his DNA.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply
post #60 of 104
Designed in California. Assembled in USA. Copied in South Korea¡
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #61 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Agree.  This idea that Tim Cook is going to build a factory that's not profitable is laughable; it's not in his DNA.

That's not even the same thing.

Having a high margin will give a hardware company room to explore and innovate. It does not mean the company will become unprofitable suddenly just by making a product in US. They took a few years to learn and shift along the way, which helps to mitigate risks and cost. It's just $100 million outlay at this point, but that's because they have spread out the execution since a few years back.

At the end of the day, the move will have to make economic sense, and be "better off" in some ways.
post #62 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

 

Moving some capability back is both just a publicity move AND a act of corporate responsibility to the country it was founded in.  Just like the solar and fuel cell capacity at the NC data center.  Both publicity for greening and an act of good corporate stewardship.

 

Companies like that should be rewarded.  Otherwise you get results like Walmart.

 

The corporate reponsibility to America point still probably stands for Wal Mart, but they have installed solar panels on every Wal Mart to make less of a dent in the power grid.  One easy example of green that info is readily available on.

post #63 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Having one, I can tell you that the Mac Pro is easily the most complex of all Macs by far. The case is very complex. You obviously haven't seen one if you think the case and electronics are simple.

 

We also don't know what the new Mac Pros will look like. Will it be smaller/larger? Less integrated? Will it even be made out of aluminum? Nothing is simple, simple...of course not. Were also talking about a machine that doesn't have all of these little parts and pieces that an iMac, MBP, MBA, or mobile device does. From an assembly stand point I would think its a hell of a lot easier to assemble a Mac Pro than it is an iMac, or portable computer. I'm not saying its easy as pie and anyone could do it, but it appears to be easier, no?

post #64 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Having one, I can tell you that the Mac Pro is easily the most complex of all Macs by far. The case is very complex. You obviously haven't seen one if you think the case and electronics are simple.

Don't sweat it. Just another person that doesn't recognize great design that makes it "appear to be easy" and that anybody could do it. 1oyvey.gif

Myself: when I bought my first MP back in '05 and opened it... it really did take my breath away. Like opening the hood to a Porsche, BMW, Audi, etc. No other case on the planet at the time was so perfectly fitted from the inside and out. Coming from BYO Win-boxes with the best parts and cases available made it doubly fascinating.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #65 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Of course the third option is XMac. If production in America is possible then even an XMac is possible.

 

What is XMac?

post #66 of 104
Originally Posted by v5v View Post
What is XMac?

 

A fantasyland product made by every other computer manufacturer out there. Apple specifically doesn't make one.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #67 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


Don't sweat it. Just another person that doesn't recognize great design that makes it "appear to be easy" and that anybody could do it. 1oyvey.gif
Myself: when I bought my first MP back in '05 and opened it... it really did take my breath away. Like opening the hood to a Porsche, BMW, Audi, etc. No other case on the planet at the time was so perfectly fitted from the inside and out. Coming from BYO Win-boxes with the best parts and cases available made it doubly fascinating.

Same here - they are beautiful inside, reflecting that design ethos that Steve learned from his dad.  However, the current case and components are somewhat complex and most surely not assembled by robots (other than the MOB).  They mostly are hand built if for no other reason than the case design is something like 10 years old.

 

If we are correct in guessing that this new US assembly plant is for MP, it will be exciting to see what Ive and his team have come up with.  The only way it makes sense is if it is almost completely assembled by robots.  U.S. hand labor is just too expensive.  If all this is true it signals a substantially different case design and component layout.

post #68 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

A fantasyland product made by every other computer manufacturer out there. Apple specifically doesn't make one.

Sometimes known as the Apple IIci.

post #69 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

A fantasyland product made by every other computer manufacturer out there. Apple specifically doesn't make one.

 

Sorry, I don't understand what you mean and wasn't able to make Google understand what I'm trying to find out.

 

It's a fantasyland product, but it's made by every other computer manufacturer? I'm confused. Not that anyone will be surprised by that... it's obvious that I have about the same intellectual prowess as your average house cat.

 

Would you mind elaborating a little on specifically what the people suggesting an XMac be built in the USA are referring to?

post #70 of 104
Originally Posted by v5v View Post
It's a fantasyland product, but it's made by every other computer manufacturer? I'm confused. 

 

They want a box with a consumer chip that you can open and take out every single component and replace yourself. Nothing really to do with being built in the US.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #71 of 104

$100 million is cheap for Apple to find a way to kill off the Mac Pro.

 

Don't give it a decent update and increase the cost by making it here. Sales will drop to nothing. Then Apple will twist it around and claim that the low sales of the Mac Pro proves that no one wants a desktop computer that offers internal expansion. It kills off the Mac Pro. Another part of Apple will use this as a case for why it doesn't make business sense to make things in the US where costs are higher.

 

Apple becomes just a consumer gadget company.

 

I hope I'm wrong but I'm cynical enough to see this happening.
 

post #72 of 104
Originally Posted by MacTac View Post

Apple becomes just a consumer gadget company.

 

1000

 

Miss the last five years?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #73 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTac View Post

$100 million is cheap for Apple to find a way to kill off the Mac Pro.

Don't give it a decent update and increase the cost by making it here. Sales will drop to nothing. Then Apple will twist it around and claim that the low sales of the Mac Pro proves that no one wants a desktop computer that offers internal expansion. It kills off the Mac Pro. Another part of Apple will use this as a case for why it doesn't make business sense to make things in the US where costs are higher.

Apple becomes just a consumer gadget company.

I hope I'm wrong but I'm cynical enough to see this happening.

 

If Apple wants to kill off the Pro, it doesn't need to do anything. It doesn't even need to invest pro software development.

If it's taking so long, may be they are trying to reinvent it ?
post #74 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post

Tim Cook is taking the billions and doing some pretty substantially forward thinking stuff. I'm sure much of this was in the works before Steve left, but Tim is going strong with it and I'm impressed. Now I'm waiting to see who can reignite the feeling of awe and excitement at events because Tim's not it. Who will I actually believe when that person says a new project is "revolutionary" or "magical". Might never happen, I guess, but it would be fun.
I wonder if they'll convince Jony Ive to get up on stage. He has an infectious hyperbole gene judging by the promo videos. 1smile.gif

 

What rule says that Apple needs to trot out a company executive to make the new product announcements? Steve Jobs could do it because of his natural showmanship, but I've not seen that level of ability with anyone else in management at Apple, HP, Microsoft, Dell, or Google. 

 

Apple should find someone with the subtle acting chops of the guy that played "I'm a PC" doing the announcements. The added advantage is that when Microsoft copies Apple we won't have to look at Monkey Boy up on stage any longer.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #75 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post


That's not even the same thing.
Having a high margin will give a hardware company room to explore and innovate. It does not mean the company will become unprofitable suddenly just by making a product in US. They took a few years to learn and shift along the way, which helps to mitigate risks and cost. It's just $100 million outlay at this point, but that's because they have spread out the execution since a few years back.
At the end of the day, the move will have to make economic sense, and be "better off" in some ways.


Tim Cook is not going to build a factory that has to be subsidized by other products or divisions.  This thing is going to contribute profits to the corporation or it's not going to be built at all.  That's why you don't find a $5 Lightning-to-30-pin connector at your local Apple store; products contribute to the bottom line or they are retired.

 

The $100 million "outlay" you talk about is a capital investment that has to be amortized over the life of the project, where a percentage of those costs are recorded as an expense (depreciation) against the goods manufactured there.  Numbers guys like Tim Cook have teams of bean counters to run all the assumptions before a dime is spent.  This is not going to be some "feel good" charity offering.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply
post #76 of 104

Very interesting interview both for the news about the Mac line production in the US and his last statement about what Jobs said to Cook before his death. 

iPod, iPad, iPad2, iPad 3, iPad Mini, iPhone, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, AppleTV (1,2 & 3), 13" MacBook Pro, 24" Cinema Display, Time Capsule, 21.5" iMac (Mid 2011)

Reply

iPod, iPad, iPad2, iPad 3, iPad Mini, iPhone, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, AppleTV (1,2 & 3), 13" MacBook Pro, 24" Cinema Display, Time Capsule, 21.5" iMac (Mid 2011)

Reply
post #77 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I disagree.  All computers are "commodity" products in the sense that you use it here, and the ones that the public "lusts" for are the high volume ones like iPhone that will never be produced in the USA.  Also, the concept of "having enough margin" to do something like this really means "having enough margin to blow" on something like this.  Apple would have to be prepared to throw away margin on what you yourself describe as their premiere product and I don't see that happening.  Apple makes an absolutely *huge* markup on all it's products and it doesn't drop it even on high volume sales, (see iPhone), let alone low volume specialty products with higher production costs.  

Samsung manufactures parts for the iphone in the Texas. The logistics aren't just production costs, and you should know that.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by MacTac View Post

$100 million is cheap for Apple to find a way to kill off the Mac Pro.

 

Don't give it a decent update and increase the cost by making it here. Sales will drop to nothing. Then Apple will twist it around and claim that the low sales of the Mac Pro proves that no one wants a desktop computer that offers internal expansion. It kills off the Mac Pro. Another part of Apple will use this as a case for why it doesn't make business sense to make things in the US where costs are higher.

 

Apple becomes just a consumer gadget company.

 

I hope I'm wrong but I'm cynical enough to see this happening.
 


This is the silliest thing I've read in a long time. You think they require an excuse to kill something? If they wanted to kill it, it would already be dead.

post #78 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportyguy209 View Post


Ugh. Who writes/edits this stuff?

Hacks/nobody

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #79 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

This is the silliest thing I've read in a long time. You think they require an excuse to kill something? If they wanted to kill it, it would already be dead.

Yup. See Xserve. Boom. It's finished. MacBook Pro 17". Boom. It's gone. No need for an elaborate $100 million ruse to allegedly "kill the Mac Pro." Apple doesn't have to justify any product decisions that way, when a just few words from Phil Schiller will do.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #80 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Either this article or another one already mentioned that the existing "made-in-the-USA" Macs are probably a test run. I believe they're also probably being built by Pegatron, based in Fremont, CA. Other stories place Fremeont as the source of the US shipments.

Yes, we've read about the possibility of Pegatron, but it's not certain. I've also read about "guesses" about it being the Mac Pro because of the lower volume. But that's a much more complex product. To me, I would think that the much simpler 21.5" iMac would be a more likely choice. Why begin with such a complex model? Apple doesn't need to make all the iMacs here, certainly not in the beginning.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Future Apple Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Apple will invest $100M to produce one line of Macs in the US in 2013