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Inaccurate Apple Maps directions causes 'life threatening issue' for travelers, says Australian... - Page 7

post #241 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

You haven't answered this question yet. I'd have to say you are dodging it. And, it certainly does appear to be the claim you made, but, as I said, I want to be sure.

Why would I be expected to answer a framed question? Your question is framed to rely on a logical fallacy, which I have already pointed ot, so why would I be required to answer it on your irrational terms?
post #242 of 498
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post
Does no one have an actual valid point?

 

Well, if Apple is still dragging their feet on transit.

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post #243 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexN View Post

Police are worried that Maps is leading them astray when the idiots are going out totally unprepared, i.e., no water in summer (or almost summer)? Are these fools trying for a Darwin Award or something? Talk about lack of bushcraft. Mindless idiots.
Unbelievable? Nah, there's one born every minute.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by radster360 View Post

It is an stupidity of the individual. It has widely been published about issues with iOS6 map. If I I am going to be in wilderness, I better check out other map to validate the accuracy, especially when it has been a public knowledge about the iOS6 map. Secondly, the interesting thing the article mentions about lack of cell coverage in the area. Even with the correct map, the person would have not been able to follow the maps. 

 

Apparently, Australia has found one thing or another to come after Apple. First, it was the LTE issue and now they are pulling this map non-sense. Apple, Screw Australia! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

 

I'm not convinced it was a set-up, but yes - these people are too stupid to hold driving licences.


When I read the headline, my notion for a comment was to ding the Aussie police for scare tactics and quote (I think) Lou Costello saying "Everybody wants to get into the [Apple-bashing] act!" But in point of fact, Apple is still encouraging people to believe in (and trust) Maps.  And a product marketed around the world should work reasonably well wherever it's sold, and not just relatively better in its largest markets.

Right on the iPhone 5 features page, just beneath a picture of mapping directions it says:  "You rely on your iPhone."

 

Which absolutely implies that you can... ...and therefore should do so.....

And about Maps itself, it still says:

 

Quote:

Maps designed by Apple.

The new Maps app gives you a better way to find your way. Map elements are vector based, which means graphics and text are incredibly sharp, even when you zoom in. Pan around, and you’ll instantly notice how smooth and responsive Maps is. Need directions from Point A to Point B? Maps not only shows you how to get there, it tells you — out loud, turn by turn. Maps also gives you real-time traffic information and reroutes you to avoid delays.

 

So rather than bash the people of an entire country ("Screw Australia!"), this is only becoming a bigger issue for Apple.  Not everyone in the world reads tech news like Tim Cook's apology, and not everyone drives into a National Park for a lark equipped for a 24 hour walk caused by faulty tech (which I would certainly call "a delay")  - but those who order from a web site or go to a store do believe what they're encouraged to believe. 

 

And even though - as others have noted - no mapping system is flawless (including paper maps), Apple's baseline release - unless you can cite a thoroughly documented study to the contrary - seems more flawed than what it replaced. 

There's legitimately defending Apple and then there's ignorant Apple Chauvinism (see - there are words other than "fanboi" to make the point).  And these kinds of posts are clearly the latter.

Apple rushed in to ditch Google when they could have taken another year - with a half-baked product that could have been marked as Beta (like Siri) - and they're still not copping to it in their own marketing materials - so they deserve every bit of criticism they're getting on this one.  And I expect will end up paying both to these folks (and maybe others) as well as in a tarnished reputation and a continuation of "Maps gate." 

 

Once a perception sets in over a period of time (see Windows Blue Screen of Death - although I haven't had one in ages on my old Win VISTA machine), it lingers long after.

Also, noting that Eddy Cue has a lot on his plate is another weak defense.  This called for a crash program from day one.  I remember Apple moving people from one major team to another (I believe it was from OS X to then iPhone OS) to get a critical release out.   While real mapping expertise may be in short supply, hiring a crew of temps to make sure that every user-submitted correction is logged, checked and dealt with in a timely manner is not beyond their resources.

 

 

 

I agree with most of what you say except: 

 

 

 

Quote:
Apple rushed in to ditch Google when they could have taken another year - with a half-baked product that could have been marked as Beta

 

Apple may have had no choice:

 

I suspect that:

 

  • Apple and Google had a multi-year agreement that Google furnish back-end data and services to Apple's Maps app.
  • this agreement was renegotiated for each new iOS/iDevice release
  • existing and older iOSes and iDevices were supported as an extension (or a condition) of the existing agreement 

 

I suspect that in the iOS 6 negotiations:

 

  • Apple wanted all the Map features available to Android
  • Google wanted to include ads in maps
  • Google wanted to track location and user data

 

A standoff resulted.  If they could not reach agreement, Apple had no choice but to offer their own solution for new iDevices and iOS6 and  discontinue the prior maps app  for same.

 

 

I have no way of knowing that the above is true -- but I have 56 years of high tech experience and 34 years dealing with Apple...  and a pretty good idea of the ritual dance among frenemies.

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post #244 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by e_veritas View Post

 

Nice try with the straw man argument, but no, that is not what I claimed at all. I hardly think that the police notifying the public about a frequently recurring issue is "behaving irresponsibly" though. This would be like saying a city was "behaving irresponsibly" for putting up a crosswalk at an intersection with frequently recurring pedestrian accidents, even though accidents still happen at other intersections that were not 'critically evaluated'.

 

Well, speaking of straw men and bad analogies...

 

But, I'm just trying to figure out what it is that you and others in this thread are trying to say, exactly what points you are trying to make. Because, frankly, none of you seems to have one and you are slippery as eels when we try to figure out what it might be.

 

So, please, what are you claiming?

post #245 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

But some of the mistakes Apple Maps has (much like this article's example of misplacing whole cities) I just don't understand how it is possible.

It is possible because Apple did a good job on the mapping, but a poor job on usability. The city isn't misplaced at all. There is just another, much larger entity with the same name. If the user doesn't supply anything like an address or postal code to differentiate, Apple returns the the centre of the bigger region instead of the town with the same name. Neither the data or not the app are technically doing anything wrong, but end result is very bad press.

post #246 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post


Why would I be expected to answer a framed question? Your question is framed to rely on a logical fallacy, which I have already pointed ot, so why would I be required to answer it on your irrational terms?

 

I'm just trying to figure out what you were trying to say when you wrote,

 

 

Quote:
Google Maps does not have to be perfect because it did not replace anything.

 

Rewording it and asking you if that was what you meant is a legitimate method of trying to understand someone. It's not a framed question at all.

 

But, please, tell us exactly what you did mean.

post #247 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Well, if they were "endorsing" other solutions, they wouldn't be implying it, would they. That's not a question, Bob.

 

Have people ever gotten lost using other mapping solutions? Did the Australian police issue statements saying they presented a life threatening issue? If so, I withdraw my statement, otherwise, I stand by it. Frankly, I think they are just caught up in the hysteria, too.

 

I'm sure others have gotten lost using other mapping solutions. I just know that in these cases, the reason the tourists got lost was because they followed Apple Maps. I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure one of the first questions the police asked them was what they were using to navigate with that got them into the situation.

 

Again, all I see is the police just reporting the facts as it is. Apple Maps was the common denominator in what I would assume is a higher than average string of people getting lost. So the police are asking people to not use it until Apple puts Mildura back where the rest of the world says it is. Nothing unprofessional at all.

 

And I don't see any proof they're "caught up in the hysteria". Unless there's some tin foil plot that you think is afoot...

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post #248 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

 

So rather than bash the people of an entire country ("Screw Australia!"), this is only becoming a bigger issue for Apple.  Not everyone in the world reads tech news like Tim Cook's apology, and not everyone drives into a National Park for a lark equipped for a 24 hour walk caused by faulty tech (which I would certainly call "a delay")  - but those who order from a web site or go to a store do believe what they're encouraged to believe. 

 

And even though - as others have noted - no mapping system is flawless (including paper maps), Apple's baseline release - unless you can cite a thoroughly documented study to the contrary - seems more flawed than what it replaced. 

There's legitimately defending Apple and then there's ignorant Apple Chauvinism (see - there are words other than "fanboi" to make the point).  And these kinds of posts are clearly the latter.

Apple rushed in to ditch Google when they could have taken another year - with a half-baked product that could have been marked as Beta (like Siri) - and they're still not copping to it in their own marketing materials - so they deserve every bit of criticism they're getting on this one.  And I expect will end up paying both to these folks (and maybe others) as well as in a tarnished reputation and a continuation of "Maps gate." 

 

 

Perhaps the reason they haven't changed the marketing materials is because they have a better idea of the real size of the problem, rather than guesswork based on the rumblings on the internet. This report, and the accompanying hysteria you've been swept along by, is based on a handful of people getting lost. How many others are actually reaching their destination using Apple Maps? Six, seven, or a few more than that?

 

I take your point on the advertising though. I once bought a packet of crisps that promised that they would be the 'best crisps I'd ever tasted'. They weren't. The packet is now in the hands of my lawyers.

 

Yeah, of course someone will sue. Someone always does.

 

Having said that, given the number of foul-ups with GPS these days, you'd think most operators would have been sued out of existence by now. I suspect that for the sake of a few bucks, no one really wants to stand up in court and admit they were foolish enough to follow their SatNav into the Pacific Ocean.

post #249 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

The real issue here, is how long does it take Apple to fix the problem.

 

Umm, maybe never.  It's whole lot cheaper just let the police to ask Australian not to use Apple map instead of fixing it.

post #250 of 498
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

Unless there's some tin foil plot that you think is afoot...


It's hardly a conspiracy to say (truthfully) that the shortcomings of Google Maps, while identical to Apple Maps, are being not only ignored, but also actively obfuscated by… let's just call 'em detractors.

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post #251 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I'm just trying to figure out what you were trying to say when you wrote,

And what did you not understand from my 4 posts following that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Rewording it and asking you if that was what you meant is a legitimate method of trying to understand someone. It's not a framed question at all.

Unless it's used to try to convey distinct concepts into an idea that misrepresents the opposition and then attacking that idea rather than the opposition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

But, please, tell us exactly what you did mean.

I've already done so, I've even included another concrete case so you could understand the difference in one of my posts. What was it that you did not understand?
post #252 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

And I don't see any proof they're "caught up in the hysteria". Unless there's some tin foil plot that you think is afoot...

 

Sorry, Bob, but being caught up in hysteria implies there is no tin foil plot, just hysteria.

 

(Gotta love the tin foil reference in the context of the present thread, though.)

post #253 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by tflanders View Post

It is possible because Apple did a good job on the mapping, but a poor job on usability. The city isn't misplaced at all. There is just another, much larger entity with the same name. If the user doesn't supply anything like an address or postal code to differentiate, Apple returns the the centre of the bigger region instead of the town with the same name. Neither the data or not the app are technically doing anything wrong, but end result is very bad press.

 

So you're saying there's a "Mildura" in Murray-Sunset National Park?

 

The Tumblr site I posted earlier has more examples of various cities that Apple Maps has misplaced. Not all of them have a similarly named entity anywhere near them. All I'm questioning is where this mapping data is coming from. Is Apple not using the same base source Nokia and Google are using? Since there are already accurate maps, where was the cross-check?

 

For individual things like stores and the such, I can understand being slightly out of place. But entire cities?

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post #254 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post


And what did you not understand from my 4 posts following that?
Unless it's used to try to convey distinct concepts into an idea that misrepresents the opposition and then attacking that idea rather than the opposition.
I've already done so, I've even included another concrete case so you could understand the difference in one of my posts. What was it that you did not understand?

 

Still no straight answer? It really looks to me like you are dodging it. I don't blame you, though. It was a pretty ridiculous thing to write. I wouldn't want to have to try to explain it either.

 

But, just in case there is any confusion, we're trying to find out what this quote from you means:

 

Quote:
Google Maps does not have to be perfect because it did not replace anything.

 

Feel free to put it in "context" if you feel I'm taking it out of context. But, frankly, I don't see how it can mean anything but that you are arguing that Google Maps and Apple Maps ought to be judged by entirely different standards because Apple Maps "replaced" Google Maps. In which case, you need to explain why getting replaced absolves one solution from criticism.


Edited by anonymouse - 12/10/12 at 11:13am
post #255 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Sorry, Bob, but being caught up in hysteria implies there is no tin foil plot, just hysteria.

 

(Gotta love the tin foil reference in the context of the present thread, though.)

 

So you're saying that the only reason the Australian police singled out Apple Maps is not because it was the cause of a recent string of tourists getting put in a life-threatening situation, but rather that they were only looking for a reason to bad-mouth Apple Maps?

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post #256 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Still no straight answer? It really looks to me like you are dodging it. I don't blame you, though. It was a pretty ridiculous thing to write. I wouldn't want to have to try to explain it either.

Ask a rational question and I will provide a rational answer. Your question has been demonstrated to be irrational.
post #257 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tflanders View Post

It is possible because Apple did a good job on the mapping, but a poor job on usability. The city isn't misplaced at all. There is just another, much larger entity with the same name. If the user doesn't supply anything like an address or postal code to differentiate, Apple returns the the centre of the bigger region instead of the town with the same name. Neither the data or not the app are technically doing anything wrong, but end result is very bad press.

 

So you're saying there's a "Mildura" in Murray-Sunset National Park?

 

The Tumblr site I posted earlier has more examples of various cities that Apple Maps has misplaced. Not all of them have a similarly named entity anywhere near them. All I'm questioning is where this mapping data is coming from. Is Apple not using the same base source Nokia and Google are using? Since there are already accurate maps, where was the cross-check?

 

For individual things like stores and the such, I can understand being slightly out of place. But entire cities?

 

No, he is saying that Murray-Sunset National Park is in the Local Government Area formally called the Rural City of Mildura.

 

Also interesting is that on the vic.gov.au mapping site, that LGA is identified just as Mildura, which presumably is how it got into the Maps database under that name.


Edited by muppetry - 12/10/12 at 11:15am
post #258 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Leaving the entire world save NA without a native mapping app at all? Let's think.

 

Every country has fault with Google Maps. What's the point?

The world would not be without a nav app, lets not get narrowed minded and think one-directional. Apple would have kept the Google or similarly app and field tested the maps apps. Do you really think people use maps apps in Russia, which bigger land area than USA.

I think you have this way of reading what you want to read and not understanding people's point of view, especially when you think something has been said bad about apple.

 

Sarcasm is not your strong point and I was just stating that maps could have been better beta tested in one country. 

Lets see it was released, it got bad reviews and everyone gone back to their previous apps, why not keep previous apps, do beta testing in select country and the roll and then roll the app out.

 

You cannot compare Google maps app earlier version to Apple, since as apps user, I expect the more recent competitor to have release an app, which is superior to earlier competitor's app and learned from their mistakes. Google Maps did have issues, but how can you compare that version with Apple Maps today. Lets be fair and because we love Apple make irrational comments.


Edited by souliisoul - 12/10/12 at 11:17am
post #259 of 498
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post
Apple would have kept the Google…

 

Except they wouldn't have.


Do you really think people use maps apps in Russia, which bigger land area than USA.

 

… Yes? What else would they use? What do you expect them to use? What does land area have to do with it? Seems to me they'd be more likely to use it than anyone else.


Sarcasm is not your strong point and I was just stating that maps could have been better beta tested in one country. 

 

1. How is that sarcasm?

2. You still haven't explained how that's "better", given that it's probably objectively worse.

 

Lets see it was released, it got bad reviews and everyone gone back to their previous apps, why not keep previous apps, do beta testing in select country and the roll and then roll the app out.

 

But this couldn't possibly have been known until after the fact. It's like in imagining alternate history when people pretend the tank could have been made earlier; the tank wasn't an obvious concept at the time.

Originally Posted by Marvin

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post #260 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

 

So you're saying that the only reason the Australian police singled out Apple Maps is not because it was the cause of a recent string of tourists getting put in a life-threatening situation, but rather that they were only looking for a reason to bad-mouth Apple Maps?

 

No, getting caught up in the hysteria implies just that, not that they had an ax to grind, just that they acted irrationally because they weren't thinking straight.

post #261 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post


Ask a rational question and I will provide a rational answer. Your question has been demonstrated to be irrational.

 

Still dodging. Everyone can see that you are being asked very simple straightforward questions. They can also see why you are trying so hard not to answer them.

post #262 of 498
"Due to bad cell coverage in the area"
Is this partly to blame too.
post #263 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Feel free to put it in "context" if you feel I'm taking it out of context.

Why would I repeat myself when you're ignoring the rest of my posts? I asked what it was that you did not understand from my explanations on those posts and you pretty much ignored both my question and those posts. I pointed out the fact that your question was loaded with a fallacy and you ignored that point too, instead choosing to claim that I am dodging it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

But, frankly, I don't see how it can mean anything but that you are arguing that Google Maps and Apple Maps ought to be judged by entirely different standards because Apple Maps "replaced" Google Maps. In which case, you need to explain why getting replaced absolves one solution from criticism.

Dude, I've already explained that here! What is it that you do not understand in that post?

PS: Please also don't edit posts after my replies. Thank you!
post #264 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

No, getting caught up in the hysteria implies just that, not that they had an ax to grind, just that they acted irrationally because they weren't thinking straight.

 

I find nothing irrational about making a statement in the interest of public safety after MULTIPLE recurring instances. In my opinion, you simply come across as an Apple apologist that is sour grapes because it happened to be iOS Maps that was the offending application.

post #265 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Except they wouldn't have.

 

… Yes? What else would they use? What do you expect them to use? What does land area have to do with it? Seems to me they'd be more likely to use it than anyone else.

 

1. How is that sarcasm?

2. You still haven't explained how that's "better", given that it's probably objectively worse.

 

 

 

But this couldn't possibly have been known until after the fact. It's like in imagining alternate history when people pretend the tank could have been made earlier; the tank wasn't an obvious concept at the time.

    Apple Maps not used in Russia, since I went their for conference and many locally said it was used for couple of weeks and then went back to Google maps or their in-car nav system.

 

2. I just giving my opinion, do not have to explain to you how it is better, since you have not explained how it is worse.

      Beta testing is standard practise before you roll out an app, Apple could have done it better!

post #266 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by e_veritas View Post

 

I find nothing irrational about making a statement in the interest of public safety after MULTIPLE recurring instances. In my opinion, you simply come across as an Apple apologist that is sour grapes because it happened to be iOS Maps that was the offending application.

 

Maybe it's because they haven't done anything like that in the past? I mean, if no one has ever gotten lost in Australia using any other mapping service, or they issued similar warnings on those occasions, then I'll retract my criticism and admit I was wrong about that. Otherwise, my criticism stands.

post #267 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

This has already been refuted in this thread, by me no less, and any further arguments you can think about when it comes to this case and my refutation of it have also been refuted. Google Maps does not have to be perfect because it did not replace anything.

Well at least you wear your double standard on your sleeve.

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post #268 of 498
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

…do not have to explain to you how it is better, since you have not explained how it is worse.

 

Taking away a mapping system entirely, giving no replacement, doesn't automatically sound "worse" to you?

 

Of course you should explain this.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #269 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post


Why would I repeat myself when you're ignoring the rest of my posts? I asked what it was that you did not understand from my explanations on those posts and you pretty much ignored both my question and those posts. I pointed out the fact that your question was loaded with a fallacy and you ignored that point too, instead choosing to claim that I am dodging it.
Dude, I've already explained that here! What is it that you do not understand in that post?
PS: Please also don't edit posts after my replies. Thank you!

 

Sorry, but the post you linked to doesn't at all explain why Google Maps doesn't have to be perfect because it's being replaced, so, no, you still haven't explained why we should accept a double standard, or, if you reject that interpretation, how that doesn't establish a double standard.

 

Still laughing at your PS, though. Yes, we're all here to serve you.

post #270 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Taking away a mapping system entirely, giving no replacement, doesn't automatically sound "worse" to you?

 

Of course you should explain this.

Did not say take away the maps system entirely, you said that, I said it should have been rolled out to NA for beta testing, as i said you read what you want to read.

 

Mt exact words cut and paste for your review 'Apple should have rolled out maps to North America subscribers only and undertake some field testing, since North America has the biggest users of navigation systems in the world and the most complete mapping details for a country'.

 

In there I did not say use Apple Maps only, just thought people would understand that I was saying field test Apple Maps with Google Maps. Only issue with my comment maybe Google would not allow this practice!

post #271 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Well at least you wear your double standard on your sleeve.

Not all cases of double standards are irrational.
post #272 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Maybe it's because they haven't done anything like that in the past? I mean, if no one has ever gotten lost in Australia using any other mapping service, or they issued similar warnings on those occasions, then I'll retract my criticism and admit I was wrong about that. Otherwise, my criticism stands.

 

According to the Victoria police, the amount of rescues required in the last 2 months has been unprecedented. They had to rescue 6 people in the last 2 months alone; all attributed to iOS maps. While I'm sure other people get lost using other mapping applications as well, there is a big difference between arriving to your location to find that your starbucks is not actually there, and being directed into the middle of nowhere.

 

The biggest problem I see is why was this not addressed earlier? Certainly after a life-threatening incidence, this was reported to Apple as an error. Where is all this "crowd sourcing" we have been hearing about? Why does it take a media frenzy to finally get something like this fixed in iOS maps. To me, that is the much bigger issue...

post #273 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

No, getting caught up in the hysteria implies just that, not that they had an ax to grind, just that they acted irrationally because they weren't thinking straight.

 

So the police issuing a warning the public that Apple Maps was the cause of multiple instances of tourists getting dangerously lost is "not thinking straight"?

 

They're trying to avoid putting any more human lives at risk.  And also saving the valueable resources needed to make the rescues by nipping the situation in the bud (of course, if they have to rescue them, they have to rescue them). Seems like they're thinking pretty straight to me.

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post #274 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

I found this interesting. I was thinking as I read this thread that anyone that uses a free apps in a remote location where they could get lost for 24 hours without food and water isn't very smart. While I don't like Apple maps because I do feel it could be better I would never use any free app if I was in a place where I could die if the map was incorrect. I use Google/Apple maps to get around traffic or to find a place for the first time.

I'm a big fan of national parks and travel to one or more per year. The US was the first to officially establish one, Yellowstone, in 1872. I also enjoy my TomTom app on my iPhone. That said, I have never once thought to use an electronic map in the park. Perhaps it's different in Australia than in the US but they usually offer comprehensive maps near or at the entrance of the park.

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post #275 of 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

Did not say take away the maps system entirely, you said that, I said it should have been rolled out to NA for beta testing, as i said you read what you want to read.

 

I'm guessing that wan't a practical option. Most speculation has been that Apple's contract with Google for mapping data expires in June 2013, thus, most likely, in the middle of an iOS development cycle, with the next version not due till the Fall. So, basically, Apple had to either put its mapping software on iOS 6.0, or wait till iOS 7.0 (because they wouldn't have wanted to divert significant resources in the middle of developing iOS 7.0). The latter would have meant they would have been forced to sign a new contract with Google, on Google's terms, which would probably not have been a good thing for anyone but Google.

post #276 of 498
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Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Sorry, but the post you linked to doesn't at all explain why Google Maps doesn't have to be perfect because it's being replaced, so, no, you still haven't explained why we should accept a double standard, or, if you reject that interpretation, how that doesn't establish a double standard.

Yes it does, in my explanation as to why people have more reason to expect quality from Apple Maps than they ever did from Google Maps. If people don't have reason to expect quality from Google Maps, it follows that Google Maps does not have to be perfect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Still laughing at your PS, though. Yes, we're all here to serve you.

Nope, but if you wish to have a rational debate (something I'm strongly beginning to doubt) you will want the people who are arguing against to read all your points, and editing your posts after they've been replied to makes it harder, not to mention that to anyone reading the thread, your edited posts make it sound like the person you're replying to is ignoring your points, when in fact they were made after the person replied to you.
post #277 of 498
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Originally Posted by e_veritas View Post

 

According to the Victoria police, the amount of rescues required in the last 2 months has been unprecedented. They had to rescue 6 people in the last 2 months alone; all attributed to iOS maps. While I'm sure other people get lost using other mapping applications as well, there is a big difference between arriving to your location to find that your starbucks is not actually there, and being directed into the middle of nowhere.

 

The biggest problem I see is why was this not addressed earlier? Certainly after a life-threatening incidence, this was reported to Apple as an error. Where is all this "crowd sourcing" we have been hearing about? Why does it take a media frenzy to finally get something like this fixed in iOS maps. To me, that is the much bigger issue...

 

So, what are the statistics on other mapping services and rescues required? I mean, we need to understand what unprecedented means in this context.

post #278 of 498
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Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

 

So the police issuing a warning the public that Apple Maps was the cause of multiple instances of tourists getting dangerously lost is "not thinking straight"?

 

They're trying to avoid putting any more human lives at risk.  And also saving the valueable resources needed to make the rescues by nipping the situation in the bud (of course, if they have to rescue them, they have to rescue them). Seems like they're thinking pretty straight to me.

 

Right, because no one ever gets lost using other software? 

post #279 of 498
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

I found this interesting. I was thinking as I read this thread that anyone that uses a free apps in a remote location where they could get lost for 24 hours without food and water isn't very smart. While I don't like Apple maps because I do feel it could be better I would never use any free app if I was in a place where I could die if the map was incorrect. I use Google/Apple maps to get around traffic or to find a place for the first time.

I'm a big fan of national parks and travel to one or more per year. The US was the first to officially establish one, Yellowstone, in 1872. I also enjoy my TomTom app on my iPhone. That said, I have never once thought to use an electronic map in the park. Perhaps it's different in Australia than in the US but they usually offer comprehensive maps near or at the entrance of the park.

 

Just by way of contrast, for search and rescue operations, at least in my district including National Parks and National Forest, we have moved substantially over to electronic mapping.

post #280 of 498
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Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

I'm guessing that wan't a practical option. Most speculation has been that Apple's contract with Google for mapping data expires in June 2013, thus, most likely, in the middle of an iOS development cycle, with the next version not due till the Fall. So, basically, Apple had to either put its mapping software on iOS 6.0, or wait till iOS 7.0 (because they wouldn't have wanted to divert significant resources in the middle of developing iOS 7.0). The latter would have meant they would have been forced to sign a new contract with Google, on Google's terms, which would probably not have been a good thing for anyone but Google.

Thanks, like when people are constructive in their feedback of people's opinions and not just 'one liners' which treats us like we in kindergarden'.

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