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IDC finds Apple leads in device value, Samsung in device volume

post #1 of 36
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In a quarterly report published on Monday, research firm IDC found Samsung to have sold a bulk of so-called "connected devices" for the third quarter, but Apple's high-value products netted the Cupertino tech giant the most cash.

IDC Tracker
Source: IDC


The results are somewhat unsurprising given Apple's position as a high-margin producer in the global marketplace, but the study went on to reveal interesting trends in the global computing landscape, noting that the overall "smart connected device market" gained 27.1 percent year-over-year. IDC found that the "collective view of PCs, tablets, and smartphones" reached a record 303.6 million shipments worth around $140.4 billion dollars for the three month period ending in September.

Shipments of connected devices are expected to hit 362 million units worth $169.2 billion in the fourth quarter thanks to a seasonal holiday bump led by tablets and smartphones, which are expected to grow 55.8 percent and 39.5 percent year-to-year, respectively.

On a per vendor basis, Samsung grew an impressive 97.5 percent from 2011 to lead the market with 21.8 percent of all shipments, while Apple trailed with 15 percent. The Cupertino, Calif., company did, however, see a $744 average selling price across all device categories to lead the market with $34.1 billion in quarter three. By contrast, Samsung managed a $434 ASP across its product lines.

"The battle between Samsung and Apple at the top of the smart connected device space is stronger than ever," said Worldwide Mobile Device Trackers Program Manager Ryan Reith.. "Both vendors compete at the top of the tablet and smartphone markets. However, the difference in their collective ASPs is a telling sign of different market approaches. The fact that Apple's ASP is $310 higher than Samsung's with just over 20 million fewer shipments in the quarter speaks volumes about the premium product line that Apple sells."

Chart: Worldwide Smart Connected Devices Market Forecast Unit Shipments (Millions), 3Q 2012Description: The data in this chart comes from the following IDC Trackers: WW Quarterly PC Tracker, WW Quarterly Tablet Tracker, and WW Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker. PC data includes Desktop PCs and Portable PCs. Tablet data does not include eReaders. Mobile Phone Data does not include Feature Phones. For further information contact Kathy Nagamine at knagamine@idc.com.Tags: Smart, Connected, Devices, Q3, 2012, 3Q, PC, Tablet, Smartphone, IDC, Apple, Samsung, Galaxy, Nexus, Mobile, Phone, notebook, tracker,phone, market, size, share, forecast, predict, shipment, laptopAuthor: IDCcharts powered by iCharts


The trend toward smaller devices is quickly eating into PC shipments as evidenced by HP, which was the only company out of the top five to see negative growth as its marketshare dropped to 4.6 percent. As HP has almost no mobile connected devices on store shelves, the metrics indicate a push to smartphones and tablets, device categories that IDC expects to see grow 95.9 percent and 131.2 percent by 2016, respectively.

IDC calls the current market state a "multi-device era," with smartphones and tablet driving shipments while traditional PCs will continue to lose ground.

"Both consumers and business workers are finding the need for multiple 'smart' devices and we expect that trend to grow for several years, especially in more developed regions," said IDC's Program Vice President of Clients and Displays Bob O'Donnell. "The advent of cloud-based services is enabling people to seamlessly move from device to device, which encourages the purchase and usage of different devices for different situations."
post #2 of 36
Pretty impressive. What this says is that even, even though Samsung had the Galaxy in release in the quarter - and Apple still selling the old iPhone beat Samsung on ASP by nearly double. Wall Street is too obsessed with units sold versus units profits -- this report should prove that this next quarter will in fact be a blow out - even if Apple sells only 25% more phones this quarter -- and we all know they'll sell more even if you don't factor in iPhone 5. The 4/4s are still flying off shelves
post #3 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathillien View Post

... speaks volumes about the premium PRICE Apple is charging for its devices 1wink.gif .

1. To me it speaks volume that there are more people going on the cheap by buying knock-off products as opposed to the minority who buy pristine quality products that are well made, last longer and have been given the utmost care by people who have an eye for detail.

2. I see 4 colors in that chart, but only 3 in the legend.
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post #4 of 36

"Connected devices" is a bizarre product category.

post #5 of 36
Okay... Apple sells quality stuff, Samsung floods the market with crap.

Does that about sums it up?? Or is some fandroid stalking this forum going to spin the article in some way?
post #6 of 36
NO SURFACE?
post #7 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Okay... Apple sells quality stuff, Samsung floods the market with crap.
Does that about sums it up?? Or is some fandroid stalking this forum going to spin the article in some way?

 

And apparently Wall Street will not be happy until Apple also floods the market with low margin crap because that is the only business model they see working long term. Strangely enough in the car market there seem to be a place for higher margin, premium brand products. But not in consumer electronics even though that has been the case since the mid 80's...

 

I understand that ASP's probably will have to come down longer term but as long as Apples challange is to make enough product to satisfy demand what is the sense in producing low margin crap to "gain marketshare"? I really do not understand how the pundits comes to this conclusion. The only thing I can see is that if Apple did this, the next collapse in stock price would be because (surprise, surprise!) the margins would go down...

post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Okay... Apple sells quality stuff, Samsung floods the market with crap.
Does that about sums it up?? Or is some fandroid stalking this forum going to spin the article in some way?

Yup. That just about sums it up.

 

The 'story' is yawn-worthy.

post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathillien View Post


Quality stuff? Seems like recently standards fell drastically in Apple Land.

Look at all these gates...

 

Sincerely yours, fandroid. lol.gif

Groan.... another one.....

post #10 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathillien View Post

Quality stuff? Seems like recently standards fell drastically in Apple Land.
Look at all these gates...

Sincerely yours, fandroid. lol.gif

Sorry, can't look at the *gates yet as I'm reading upon the 1812 tips and tricks on how to save battery life on my Android phone.
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post #11 of 36
Funny , Apple's "drastically fallen standards" are still higher than fandroid's.....👽
post #12 of 36

Steve Jobs said that Android was 'stolen' property.

 

Samsung make plastic junk and flood the market with it.  They're the M$ of 'hardware.'  (But as a company, they're even worse, even more blatant...)

 

They copied Apple's iPhone to get a head in the smart phone market.

 

When Apple completely move away from them...they won't have 'fast track' inside knowledge for 'fast following.'

 

The S3 is just an aped iPhone/iPod design.  It's big.  Bloated.  Bland.  (with a cheap plastic and flimsy lid that covers the battery...)  It's in no way state of the art.  It's interface is fussy and mediocre.  They don't even make their own operating system.  

 

Samsung.  On my 'no fly' list.

 

Lemon Bon Bon.

You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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post #13 of 36

Apple aren't faultless.  But I'd rather have Apple kit than not.

 

They're the ones that make their own OS, design their hardware and use components to bring it all together in a magic sauce Apple style.

 

I have never had that vibe from M$, Samecrap, Joogle, hyperbola, International Dull Machines etc.

 

With 120 Billion sitting in the bank, I'm hoping that Apple's future legacy is assured for as long as I need Apple kit.

 

I got fed up with using the crap from other companies.

 

Lemon Bon Bon.

You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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You know, for a company that specializes in the video-graphics market, you'd think that they would offer top-of-the-line GPUs...

 

WITH THE NEW MAC PRO THEY FINALLY DID!  (But you bend over for it.)

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post #14 of 36

But again Wall Street narrow minds only care about unit shipments, they do not care if you making more money than anyone else, they want to see large unit ships even if you have to give a $ away with each shipment.

post #15 of 36
Samsung sells millions of high-end SIII's and Notes and it still isn't enough to offset all the low-end junk they sell. Yet more facts that prove most Android devices are NOT flagship models, yet haters still refuse to accept it.

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post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Samsung sells millions of high-end SIII's and Notes and it still isn't enough to offset all the low-end junk they sell. Yet more facts that prove most Android devices are NOT flagship models, yet haters still refuse to accept it.

I hadn't ever seen anyone make the claim most Android devices are "flagship models". I thought it was pretty well know that moniker is normally assigned to the best of the models in a manufacturers lineup. 

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post #17 of 36

The concerns regarding Apple are completely valid. We saw them play out with the PC vs Mac and they could play out again here with smartphones and tablets.

 

Apple does take the majority of profits and can currently demand more per device. However the smartphone market isn't completely commoditized yet. It's starting to get very close though and when that happens, the price differences due to scale could grow to the point that Apple becomes uncompetitive.

 

Right now as an example you had several different makers all with different screen sizes and resolutions on Android. Google with their Nexus line has been establishing a sort of middle ground for the Android platform. As an example they set the screen resolution at roughly 4 inches with a resolution of 1280x720 for two years now. Most of the industry has followed a similar suit and now suddenly LG can push out Nexus smartphones for them for an off-contract price of $300.

 

Take this trend 12 months down the road and you'll have $150-200 Nexus class phone devices and Apple will still be wanting $650.

 

Apple is a great company. Their ecosystem and device OS are the easier to use by far and for most offer the most complete solution. This is worth a premium. However as noted in the Apple television article though, this premium is about 20-25%. It isn't 100-200%.

 

Everything in life has a tipping point or a failure point. No one person or company is above such rules. Apple for example never made just one iPod model a year and kept the same price point for it while letting others address the market with all manner of devices. Apple actively went with multiple models at multiple sizes and multiple price points.

 

They've not done this with the iPhone. They need to do it and they might even need to be willing to entertain some additional standardization to help keep costs down. Finally they really need to get their software act back together. No one is going to keep looking at things like Maps, Podcast and using their iOS devices with iWorks 2009 available ONLY on their Mac as a compelling reason to use an iOS device. Perhaps we could even discuss how using your iOS devices to gather media for use with iLife 11 isn't exactly performing either.

 

It's like Apple has taken an entire year off or perhaps multiple years off with regard to hardware and software. People are complaining that iOS 6 feels stale. The tent poles for iOS feel beta or underwhelm. We are talking about Siri, Maps, and yes they are advertising taking the iPod app, re-skinning it, removing features and changing the name of it as a tent pole feature of iOS 6.

 

The latest Apple ad is advertising the noise cancelling microphone of the iPhone 5. I mean most phones have had that for years including iPhone since the 4. It really feels like they are scrapping the bottom of the barrel right now.


Edited by trumptman - 12/11/12 at 7:24am

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post #18 of 36
Originally Posted by Nathillien View Post
Quality stuff? Seems like recently standards fell drastically in Apple Land.

Look at all these gates...

 

Okay, maybe you missed the part where all of us here made those up on purpose. Did… did you miss that? Let's pretend that you did: we made them up on purpose. 

 

So in that way, they're exactly like all the previous "real" -gates.

 

Now, why did we make them up? To mock the previous "real" -gates. We derived humor from blowing out of proportion problems that weren't. Issues that aren't. Truly insignificant (or even nonexistent) aspects of new devices.

 

We did it to force the media to second-guess themselves the next time they want to call something a -gate, lest they also be perceived as mocking the problem they're trying to create in the first place, as well as perceived as a less than serious news source.

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post #19 of 36
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

We did it to force the media to second-guess themselves the next time they want to call something a -gate, lest they also be perceived as mocking the problem they're trying to create in the first place, as well as perceived as a less than serious news source.

The media already caught on I think. Yesterday they were calling it Mapocalypse. 1rolleyes.gif

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post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

The concerns regarding Apple are completely valid. We saw them play out with the PC vs Mac and they could play out again here with smartphones and tablets.

 

 

This isn't the 1990s. 

 

Current market dynamics are *completely* different. Additionally, Apple is not the same company, or regarded the same way by consumers at large, as they were in the 1990s. 

 

Perish the thought of any and all comparisons between current market "wars" and the PC/Mac wars of a bygone and dead era of 15-20 years ago. 

 

For one thing, Apple never had *this* level of mindshare:

 

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/154928/47-of-consumers-interested-in-apple-television-willing-to-pay-20-premium

 

In fact, nobody in today's market even comes close to Apple-level mindshare. As long as a bomb doesn't drop on Cupertino, Apple can go on mindshare alone for a long, long time. But we all know what Apple's philosophy is, which has *earned* them all that mindshare. No one else in the industry is in such an enviable position. 


Edited by Quadra 610 - 12/11/12 at 8:23am
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathillien View Post


Quality stuff? Seems like recently standards fell drastically in Apple Land.

Look at all these gates...

 

If only they were a reflection of reality. 

 

Come talk to us when Apple no longer rules Consumer Satisfaction with an iron fist in *every category* in which they compete. 

post #22 of 36
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
The media already caught on I think. Yesterday they were calling it Mapocalypse. 1rolleyes.gif

 

Ooh! Time for some real creativity, then. Instead of appending -gate, we'll make some portmanteaux!

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

This isn't the 1990s. 

 

Current market dynamics are *completely* different. Additionally, Apple is not the same company, or regarded the same way by consumers at large, as they were in the 1990s. 

 

Perish the thought of any and all comparisons between current market "wars" and the PC/Mac wars of a bygone and dead era of 15-20 years ago. 

 

For one thing, Apple never had *this* level of mindshare:

 

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/154928/47-of-consumers-interested-in-apple-television-willing-to-pay-20-premium

 

In fact, nobody in today's market even comes close to Apple-level mindshare. As long as a bomb doesn't drop on Cupertino, Apple can go on mindshare alone for a long, long time. But we all know what Apple's philosophy is, which has *earned* them all that mindshare. No one else in the industry is in such an enviable position. 

 

First the mindshare argument is just ridiculous. You are basically saying Apple will continue to perform because people think Apple will continue to perform. It is circular and not based on anything in reality.

 

That said as someone who lived through those 90's, Apple absolutely had massive mindshare. Apple II's were in all the schools. Mac's were the only thing out there doing desktop publishing, MIDI and other things properly. Windows was still more like a DOS task-manager. Apple had massively increasingly sales every year up until 1995 and we all know what happened that year. Even in that year their sales still had increased from $9 billion to $11 billion.

 

The problems are very similar in that Apple was selling PC's for a premium within an already premium market and when Windows 95 hit and the complete commodification of the PC industry occurred. Everyone went from selling $2,500 PC's and Apple welling mostly $3,500 average price Macs to $1000-1500 PC's. The change nearly killed Apple.

 

The change this time will happen much, much faster and in some ways could be more difficult because it isn't just a piece of hardware, it is an entire ecosystems and multiple industries.

 

It isn't just Apple vs Microsoft this time.

 

It is Apple versus various sub-contractors and suppliers with Samsung.

 

It is Apple versus former foes in Microsoft.

 

It is Apple versus the cloud, search and data with Google.

 

It is Apple versus e-commerce with Amazon and Google.

 

It is Apple versus social media with Facebook.

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post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

 

First the mindshare argument is just ridiculous. You are basically saying Apple will continue to perform because people think Apple will continue to perform. It is circular and not based on anything in reality.

 

That said as someone who lived through those 90's, Apple absolutely had massive mindshare. Apple II's were in all the schools. Mac's were the only thing out there doing desktop publishing, MIDI and other things properly. Windows was still more like a DOS task-manager. Apple had massively increasingly sales every year up until 1995 and we all know what happened that year. Even in that year their sales still had increased from $9 billion to $11 billion.

 

The problems are very similar in that Apple was selling PC's for a premium within an already premium market and when Windows 95 hit and the complete commodification of the PC industry occurred. Everyone went from selling $2,500 PC's and Apple welling mostly $3,500 average price Macs to $1000-1500 PC's. The change nearly killed Apple.

 

The change this time will happen much, much faster and in some ways could be more difficult because it isn't just a piece of hardware, it is an entire ecosystems and multiple industries.

 

It isn't just Apple vs Microsoft this time.

 

It is Apple versus various sub-contractors and suppliers with Samsung.

 

It is Apple versus former foes in Microsoft.

 

It is Apple versus the cloud, search and data with Google.

 

It is Apple versus e-commerce with Amazon and Google.

 

It is Apple versus social media with Facebook.

 

 

With a paltry 2 or at most, 3 smartphones, Apple commands a massive chunk of *overall* US phone share, for example. And that's with a bare minimum of models. 

 

Then there's this:

 

http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/11/27/iphone-5-doubles-apples-share-of-us-smartphone-sales-to-surpass-android

 

It's Apple vs. Apple. Their entire strategy, as long as they continue to execute it, will continue to have a large segment of the consumer tech market locked down *indefinitely*. Why? Because no one is doing what Apple is doing. 

 

Apple in the 1990s did not perfect vertical integration. They fumbled that business model. But when it's executed correctly, nothing beats it in terms of the value proposition for the consumer. The big difference from the 19905 to today, is that Apple has perfected vertical integration. No one else has. And no one else enjoys the kind of success Apple enjoys. 

post #25 of 36

Sooner, rather than later, Apple will have to change its business plan and start cutting down its prices (and thus its margins) to compete in the growth markets (BRIC countries being the prime example). 

 

Slowly, Samsung and others will start taking more of Apple's customer away (as it is doing it now). 

 

You cant just stick to the add-value proposition forever. Your market shares will inevitably decline and your leverage for cheaper components will also decline as well, cutting further into your margins. 

 

Once investors get a whiff of falling margins, the stock prices will reflect that. (negatively). 

 

Apple has two options: 

 

1) Cut prices and target growth segments 

 

2) Invest heavily into vertical integration to control and manage its cost structure. 

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post #26 of 36
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post
First the mindshare argument is just ridiculous. You are basically saying Apple will continue to perform because people think Apple will continue to perform. It is circular and not based on anything in reality.

 

It's how Windows has operated for the past two decades. This is only changing because they're changing; if Windows 8 hadn't been different, they would have kept it up. 

 

Now they've doomed themselves, which is the only way a company CAN when they have a majority mindshare. So screw 'em.

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post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


1. To me it speaks volume that there are more people going on the cheap by buying knock-off products as opposed to the minority who buy pristine quality products that are well made, last longer and have been given the utmost care by people who have an eye for detail.
2. I see 4 colors in that chart, but only 3 in the legend.

 

Knock-offs are nothing new. Apple offers premium products that remain worthy of being 'knocked-off' (so to speak). They sell prestigious tech.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #28 of 36
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Originally Posted by Nathillien View Post


Note the adticle's heading and the meaning of value.

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post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by trumptman View Post
First the mindshare argument is just ridiculous. You are basically saying Apple will continue to perform because people think Apple will continue to perform. It is circular and not based on anything in reality.

 

It's how Windows has operated for the past two decades. This is only changing because they're changing; if Windows 8 hadn't been different, they would have kept it up. 

 

Now they've doomed themselves, which is the only way a company CAN when they have a majority mindshare. So screw 'em.

 

Windows did and does operate that way. However it is clear they are being knocked aside not by another competitor but by an entirely different type of computing. They are trying to bridge the gap but Google got there first and continues to execute better. They've become IBM to the next Microsoft.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

With a paltry 2 or at most, 3 smartphones, Apple commands a massive chunk of *overall* US phone share, for example. And that's with a bare minimum of models. 

 

Then there's this:

 

http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/11/27/iphone-5-doubles-apples-share-of-us-smartphone-sales-to-surpass-android

 

It's Apple vs. Apple. Their entire strategy, as long as they continue to execute it, will continue to have a large segment of the consumer tech market locked down *indefinitely*. Why? Because no one is doing what Apple is doing. 

 

Apple in the 1990s did not perfect vertical integration. They fumbled that business model. But when it's executed correctly, nothing beats it in terms of the value proposition for the consumer. The big difference from the 19905 to today, is that Apple has perfected vertical integration. No one else has. And no one else enjoys the kind of success Apple enjoys. 

 

 

Pretend there is this thing called THE REST OF THE WORLD and THE THREE OTHER QUARTERS WHERE AN IPHONE DOESN'T LAUNCH.

 

It is ridiculous to project as a trend how Apple does in it's strongest market during it's strongest quarter and use it as a norm. Again, I'm going to dispute what you said because Apple was VERY well vertically integrated in the 90's. The problem was the technology moved so fast that those vertical solutions were swept by the wayside. No one cared about MIDI controllers when computers became powerful enough to emulate and create all the instruments, effects and do the recording by themselves. No one cared about Firewire anymore when tape was eliminated and the camera did all the processing and you just needed to copy over the files.

 

I can remember when my friend bought one of the first aftermarket enhancement kits for one of the top HP printers. It helped double the effective resolution to 1200 DPI which allowed him to typeset his own book and send it to the publisher for a small run. He had written the book using Word on a Windows PC. Apple having the most comprehensive solution there mattered when you trying to walk over files on ZIP disks for printing. It stopped mattering when everyone could print 1200 DPI from their laserprinters and they preferred PDF's anyway instead of receiving paper anyway.

 

Apple does not have perfect vertical integration. There are articles out right now noting how it might have been Apple who helped create the Samsung monster by giving them the knowledge and expertise to build parts for the iPhone. Apple does not make all the apps for the iPhone and this allows competitors to put solutions/apps onto the iPhone that can facilitate a move way from Apple. People mention missing Google Maps. Apple's first and most well known push provider is Yahoo. Much of their information in terms of maps and reviews comes from Yelp and Tom-tom. Other providers like Amazon offer content on iOS, but Apple does not respond in kind. So someone can actually buy cheaper and future proof their purchases by say, buying Kindle books which can then be used almost anywhere instead of iBooks which must come from only Apple.

 

Apple's vertical integration used to provide synergy. You'd buy a Mac and get the whole iLife software bundle to help save you money. Now Apple charges for the same apps on iOS. Meanwhile it is Google providing a free email service, free office suite, free YouTube hosting, etc. Does Google provider most of these for iOS as well? Sure and for the same reason Apple provided Safari and iTunes on Windows.

 

Get the picture? I hope someone does.

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post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

Apple's vertical integration used to provide synergy. You'd buy a Mac and get the whole iLife software bundle to help save you money. Now Apple charges for the same apps on iOS. Meanwhile it is Google providing a free email service, free office suite, free YouTube hosting, etc. Does Google provider most of these for iOS as well? Sure and for the same reason Apple provided Safari and iTunes on Windows.

Get the picture? I hope someone does.

Yeah, I get the picture. Though I wish Apple would sell it to me!

Seriously, no, there is no 'free'. Not even with Google. They are discontinuing Gmail Push Notification as of Feb 1st, 2013 for new subscribers, because they don't want to pay MS their EAS license.

There is no free iLife; it comes bundled with a new Mac - meaning the price is included in the hardware purchase. You want to upgrade iLife to a new version; you'll pay for the software. Gees, you'd think those data centers from Apple, FaceBook and all are, what, free?
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post #31 of 36
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Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Yeah, I get the picture. Though I wish Apple would sell it to me!
Seriously, no, there is no 'free'. Not even with Google. They are discontinuing Gmail Push Notification as of Feb 1st, 2013 for new subscribers, because they don't want to pay MS their EAS license.
There is no free iLife; it comes bundled with a new Mac - meaning the price is included in the hardware purchase. You want to upgrade iLife to a new version; you'll pay for the software. Gees, you'd think those data centers from Apple, FaceBook and all are, what, free?

That only affects MS for the most part, so it's clearly intended to disadvantage their Windows8 platform. Apple already supports the same alternative sync standard as Google does so iOS users won't even notice it.

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post #32 of 36
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

That only affects MS for the most part, so it's clearly intended to disadvantage their Windows8 platform. Apple already supports the same alternative sync standard as Google does so iOS users won't even notice it.

I know, thanks. I was trying to point out that There ain't no such thing as a free lunch (Wiki), not even when the EU mandates it. iPhone 5 to come with free Lightning to micro USB adapter in China

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post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


I know, thanks. I was trying to point out that There ain't no such thing as a free lunch (Wiki)

Phil, take a few minutes to read this editorial concerning Google and Windows8. Well worth the time IMO.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/14/editorial-windows-phone-future-without-google/

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Phil, take a few minutes to read this editorial concerning Google and Windows8. Well worth the time IMO.
http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/14/editorial-windows-phone-future-without-google/

Thanks, really good article. It's pretty sad; they do have the potential, but without partnerships it will prove to be very difficult to win users over. I think they are doing things right, with their different UI and all, but there really needs to be great incentive to get people buy your product.

With MS being the Enterpice Default as a software supplier I wonder if they'll ever go broke. They have all these spin-off projects. Really boggles the mind to think how many billions get spent on projects that are not their core business. I understand companies want to expend their potential, but I think blowing $10B on a new OS should be enough already. But if they do want to make their Windows Phone work, they better step up their game, as their partners don't seem to be interested in their current efforts.
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How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
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post #35 of 36
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Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Sooner, rather than later, Apple will have to change its business plan and start cutting down its prices (and thus its margins) to compete in the growth markets (BRIC countries being the prime example). 

 

Slowly, Samsung and others will start taking more of Apple's customer away (as it is doing it now). 

 

True.

 

One of the top reasons Apple always presents for their injunction requests against Samsung, is their worry that that once a customer goes Samsung, then it's much more difficult for Apple to get them back.   Apple is also famous for selling to students etc... with the idea that if they get a customer while they're young, they usually stay a customer for a long time.  Plus there's the halo effect of buying more products.  So Apple is definitely aware of the value and the need to win hearts early on.

 

That said, it sure seems that Apple wants to delay making a lower profit margin entry model for as long as possible.  Apparently they figure they can change their mind at any time and still win over a lot of customers.

 

Anything is possible, of course.  Predictions are difficult in this business.  The cell phone landscape can change very quickly.

post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Sooner, rather than later, Apple will have to change its business plan and start cutting down its prices

Already done, 5 years ago.

That's iPhone. They also did it with Aperture which tarted at $499, now $79. And some prices go up, for varying factors, obviously.

I wish they'd make the iPhone $1999; I wouldn't like it if their products become similar priced as the competition; less Apple users means less bitching (that can be a tagline).
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