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Android growth prior to iPhone 5 launch further established market dominance - Page 3

post #81 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevt View Post

By paragraph

 

(1) As a user of Apple products rather than an Apple shareholder, I couldn't care less whether Apple, Google, Samsung or whoever is making more money. I care about the quality of the products I use, not whose pockets are being filled. (Though I resent the Ad-intrusive means inherent to Google's business model.)

 

(2) Utter nonsense. Android succeeds in terms of marketshare because it competes in every sector. From the high end, where top Samsung models are selling reasonably well against the iPhone, to the bargain basement - and everything in between.

 

(3) What's a 'take over'? Android could well 'take over' the smartphone market to the same extent and, gallingly, in exactly the same manner as Windows did. Sure they never eradicated Macs from the face of the earth, and it still a thriving platform. But things got worse for Mac Users as the Mac's marketshare shrank. Major developers who'd written great software for the Mac first, began to give more priority to PC versions - understandably. At the moment developers, for well rehearsed reasons, prefer iOS - it's a huge factor in making it a superior platform. But if marketshare trends continue, they will switch attention to Android first.

 

Apple needs a less expensive smartphone. They showed in the development of the iPod range (which retained market dominance), that they could compete at lower price points than top end - without their products feeling cheap - indeed some of their best designed iPods were in their mid-range nano/mini models.

 

 

(4) To value people by the products they use, or in many cases using the only devices they can afford, shows incredibly shallow judgment.

 

Some of the clearest, least "religious" thinking in any of the posts in the thread. 

 

I'd add that Apple's "purist" take on usage ergonomics and Retinazation blinded them to the fact that people (at least Americans, among others) like bigger screens, period - which is why Samsung's been able to penetrate at the higher end as well.  Leaving Apple "Hoist on their own Reality Distortion Field" as it were.....  ...courtesy of the "one true aesthetic" now carried forward by Sir Jonny....

Most people spend more time taking in and sharing content than they do controlling their phones "with one thumb" - which is hard to do on an iPhone 5 anyway - and wouldn't give a rat's ass in practice if the ppi had dropped to 280 or 260 to have a flashier view of your pics and vids, etc.  And the keyboard use I see the most of - messaging - is generally done with both hands anyway.

 

The fact that millions of iPad owners are choosing their "low res" Minis over their retinized Full Size iPads - even when they own both - shows that the eye adapts to accepting the resolution in front of it whatever they can notice in side by side comparisons.

And sticking to one model per year as well... ...a habit they've already profitably broken on the iPad, but still seem stuck on with phones in a world of people of all sizes and ways of using them... ...and now hundreds of other choices, even if only a few truly competitive ones...  ..it hasn't made sense to me for two years and still doesn't.

I think the "$0" on contract iPhone 4 fills in the low end for Apple (unless non-contract models gain traction in some big countries like this one), but even though the screen size horse is already out of the barn, they still need to pull their thumb out of their precious butts and introduce two screen sizes next year to allow customer choice.  If they can, that is:  They kind of backed themselves into a corner with their 16:9 pure Retina, still one-handed mantra on the 5 though, as that aspect ratio might not scale well to SIII sizes.  So they prol'ly won't.

More's the pity.  Gonna cost 'em. I like big screens, and if that makes me not "discerning enough" for Apple, well, we'll see what's out there by next fall. Lots of factors to weigh.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post
......This will continue to be a two-horse race.  Apple will sell devices that people want and Google will continue to service devices that cell phone companies want to give away.  

 

Or a three or four horse race.  MS has resources and time, e.g., and people who see Win Phones tend to like 'em.   And it's always taken MS 3 iterations to get anything finally right (or rightish). 

 

Also as Win 8 becomes more familiar in general, the similarities will play toward Win Phone's advantage - in the phone space if not the PC.  As a 30 year user of Finders and Explorers and menus and windowing and such, I'm not always happy in the walled garden of iOS by any means. 

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #82 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

Google is winning the "race," all right - the Race To The Bottom. no doubt 75% of the world's phones - they will all be "smartphones" soon - could wind up some flavor - many forked - of Android. these will be mostly the cheap "free + contract" phones - which is simply all that 2/3 of the world can afford. so only 1/12 of the world will actually prefer Android - 8.5%. if Apple holds just 20% of that future global market - a lot more than that - at premium prices it will be the world's biggest and most profitable company. that isn't exactly "losing."

 

all the others - RIM, MS, and ? - will be lucky to not get totally squeezed out and hang on to the other 5% combined. very good chance RIM won't survive (someone else will buy its carcass/OS), and Windows Phone becomes MS' permanent "hobby."

 

i'm amazed anyone pays these "analysts" to come up with such stupid drivel.

LOL....race to the bottom. Nice

post #83 of 176
The real story here is that Apple will likely begin 6 month release cycles instead of one year.

That's really the only advantage the many android manufacturers have. Once the iPhone has gotten 6 months old, they release something with newer tech, knowing that apple won't release for another 6 months.

6 month cycles fixes that.
post #84 of 176


 

 

 

Or a three or four horse race.  MS has resources and time, e.g., and people who see Win Phones tend to like 'em.   And it's always taken MS 3 iterations to get anything finally right (or rightish). 

 

Also as Win 8 becomes more familiar in general, the similarities will play toward Win Phone's advantage - in the phone space if not the PC.  As a 30 year user of Finders and Explorers and menus and windowing and such, I'm not always happy in the walled garden of iOS by any means. 

 

Regarding MS....I suppose it is possible that MS could succeed, but not likely.  Microsoft is what it is today because of corporate IT.  MS was a lucky bastard that was at the right place at the right time with a shitty product.  That shitty product (windows) needed an IT department to make it work and then that same IT department needed a shitty product to justify the existence of an entire team of IT people.  

 

The problem for MS is that the consumer has no need for an IT department nor do they want one.  In consumer world, MS has no distribution channels and no way to force people to buy their products.  They can't get the tecoms to push their product because Google gives them a suitable alternative for free.  MS can't charge for a product that is already available for free.  Its a huge problem and MS is going to slowly go down the drain over the next 20 years.  However, for the near term, they will be printing money from their legacy business.  Nice cash flow = good stock price.

post #85 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Using Apple's financial reports to figure out percentages, it works out to be about $200 in pure profit on a $650 phone.  Which is still a lot.  And it really goes up if the user gets a model with more storage at Apple's massive Flash markup.

Dayum! There is $450 worth of parts, manufacturing and other stuff in every 16GB iPhone?

That's kinda crazy!
post #86 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post

Use Lightning adapter as an model, Apple could do the unthinkable: License iOS to OEM's

 

Say goodbye to everything that makes iOS worth having. 

post #87 of 176

Android poised to "take over the smartphone market," analyst says 

 

Not buying this prediction.

post #88 of 176
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post
The real story here is that Apple will likely begin 6 month release cycles instead of one year. That's really the only advantage the many android manufacturers have.

 

Not really, given that people consider their Android devices to have far less worth after only one year of use. By the time your two year contract is up, it's completely worthless. 

 

Not so with an iPhone. 

 

Apple saying "our stuff isn't worth much" by doubling update rates is the last thing they need to do.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #89 of 176

I'll wait until there actually *is* a problem until I'll start wondering about Apple's strategy. I've got no reason yet. Because they usually know better than everyone else. And you don't necessarily see that immediately until you see the results months later. 

 

This is Apple. Not HP. Not HTC. Not Dell. And *certainly not* Nokia. Apple approaches consumer tech from an entirely different place. 

post #90 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

There have been numerous studies done by several different companies tracking different metrics from actual internet usage to advertising impressions and even to shopping on Black Friday. They all come up with similar numbers that show 2:1 for iPhones over Android phones and almost 9:1 for iPads over Android tablets.


The fact that the study you linked can't even break out iPads from iPhones shows how reliable their analytics software is. Modern analytics software can easily identify the device, OS version and even manufacturer. I use the basic version of Google Analytics on my website and even it can separate iPhones from iPads or tell me how many Samsung Galaxy or LG Optimus visitors I've had to my site.

I'm surprised you didn't try and pull the "Android users can change their user agent so they don't show up as mobile" crap that so many Android users still try to peddle as an excuse for the traffic disparity between iOS and Android.


Hardly shifting. The people that count (developers and advertisers) use these same numbers to decide where they should spend their money. That's why iOS also has a 2:1 advantage over Android in terms of developer support. Nobody wants to waste time coding for a device that the user never even uses as it's intended. It's also why App quality is superior on iOS and why iOS usually gets the first version of something new.

And where did you get that "history of claims" from? I don't recall anyone making those claims. Or are you going to take the opinions of a few fanboys with extreme views and try to apply them to the rest of us?

First, developers don't choose a platform based on web usage. They choose it based on their likely profit, which currently biases their efforts toward Apple.

As far as the claims from the past go, maybe you haven't been here long enough. I've been reading this site for over a decade and posting for a couple years. There have been countless threads where the overwhelming view of the members of this site were the views I listed before. Every time Android broke through one of the “never will happen" barriers, a new metric was created to judge the success of Android. Your new metric is the least sensible I've seen.
post #91 of 176
^ Funny, cuz whenever a study shows something Android users don't like (for example, Internet usage stats) they always try to come up with metric to minimize it (like my aforementioned "user agent" claim). Or when benchmarks show Apple devices destroying Android devices in GPU performance and suddenly GPU performance isn't important. Or the fact the App Store has far more Apps than Google Play and suddenly "quantity doesn't matter, quality does".

I don't have enough time to go over all the Android apologist excuses I've heard, and I haven't even been here that long.

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post #92 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

First, developers don't choose a platform based on web usage. They choose it based on their likely profit, which currently biases their efforts toward Apple.
Sorry, but most Apps are free, and not for profit. Of all the iOS developers I know and work with most of them develop Apps to give a presence to a company or website. These days having an App is considered as important as having a website was 15 years ago. Anyone looking at the numbers will realize they have a larger potential audience if they develop for iOS.

This is why my local butcher (to use an example), has an App in the App Store, but currently has no plans to bother with an Android version. I'll be using his App to order another turkey this year and get it brined to my liking.

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post #93 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

^ Funny, cuz whenever a study shows something Android users don't like (for example, Internet usage stats) they always try to come up with metric to minimize it (like my aforementioned "user agent" claim). Or when benchmarks show Apple devices destroying Android devices in GPU performance and suddenly GPU performance isn't important. Or the fact the App Store has far more Apps than Google Play and suddenly "quantity doesn't matter, quality does".
I don't have enough time to go over all the Android apologist excuses I've heard, and I haven't even been here that long.

You will see the same thing on both Sides. Three months ago when the iPhone 5 was reported to be the fastest smartphone it was all that was talked about. Now that the Nexus 4 and Optimus G are "faster" (benchmarks) specs are not important. When the iPhone 5 was shown to be the most wanted device that was all that was important. Truth is the fan boys will always say a category they are not winning in is not important and one they are is the most important. Simple fanboy logic "the only thing important is what we are winning in."
post #94 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post


Sorry, but most Apps are free, and not for profit. Of all the iOS developers I know and work with most of them develop Apps to give a presence to a company or website. These days having an App is considered as important as having a website was 15 years ago. Anyone looking at the numbers will realize they have a larger potential audience if they develop for iOS.
This is why my local butcher (to use an example), has an App in the App Store, but currently has no plans to bother with an Android version. I'll be using his App to order another turkey this year and get it brined to my liking.

You think you're disagreeing with me, but you're actually agreeing.  I said developers choose a platform based on likely profit.  Profit comes from a whole host of sources and is not limited to profit generated directly from sales of an app.  By placing a free app on the app store, a company gains exposure and generates revenue from sales of its products, sales of ad space, subscription fees, or a number of other sources depending on what type of company created the app.  Revenues no matter the source lead to profit (after deducting costs, of course).  Apps on iOS still bring more profit than apps on Android, so developers and the corporations that hire them are still focusing on Apple's platform before Google's.

post #95 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post

Wow....Apple is a scrappy underdog? We all get what you are saying, but a hundred years from now someone looking back at this will be scratching their heads asking how someone could possibly describe the second largest company in the world (by market cap) as the "scrappy underdog".  

 

Oh, so now Fandroids agree that profit share matters more than market share? Because, I'm pretty sure having a teensy sliver of the market (compared to Windows and Android) makes you the underdog no matter what your market cap is.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #96 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

^ Funny, cuz whenever a study shows something Android users don't like (for example, Internet usage stats) they always try to come up with metric to minimize it (like my aforementioned "user agent" claim). Or when benchmarks show Apple devices destroying Android devices in GPU performance and suddenly GPU performance isn't important. Or the fact the App Store has far more Apps than Google Play and suddenly "quantity doesn't matter, quality does".
I don't have enough time to go over all the Android apologist excuses I've heard, and I haven't even been here that long.

I'm not making excuses, and I'm not an Android apologist.  I have a balanced and rational viewpoint.  You, on the other hand, are an Apple apologist.  If according to you, Android apologists create metrics to downplay unfavorable statistics and boost favorable ones, then by that definition you are biased toward Apple because you have done that.  Your bias is keeping you from looking at the circumstances rationally.

post #97 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retrogusto View Post

[...] some of those people will get iPhones when they realize how bad the cheaper devices are.

 

And some former iPhone users are getting Samsungs because they're not that bad. Where I work the iPhone is still the dominant device, but a few people have switched. I haven't spoken to any of them about it at length yet, but their reasons for switching included things like preferring the bigger screen, liking how Android lets you customize things like "shortcuts" on the home screen that iOS doesn't, and the contract they wanted was not offered with the iPhone.

 

My daughter has a Galaxy and it's a perfectly good smartphone. The screen looks fine, and the battery life is comparable to my iPhone 4.

post #98 of 176

Your metaphors are amusingly overwhelming, but it is also the sad truth. lol.gif

post #99 of 176
You have to remember that Apple still is the number one manufacturer of any single phone. That alone should say something about how far apple is away from dying.
post #100 of 176
Methinks there are a lot of "commentators" out there shorting Apple stock...
post #101 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevt View Post

By paragraph

 

(1) As a user of Apple products rather than an Apple shareholder, I couldn't care less whether Apple, Google, Samsung or whoever is making more money. I care about the quality of the products I use, not whose pockets are being filled. (Though I resent the Ad-intrusive means inherent to Google's business model.)

 

(2) Utter nonsense. Android succeeds in terms of marketshare because it competes in every sector. From the high end, where top Samsung models are selling reasonably well against the iPhone, to the bargain basement - and everything in between.

 

(3) What's a 'take over'? Android could well 'take over' the smartphone market to the same extent and, gallingly, in exactly the same manner as Windows did. Sure they never eradicated Macs from the face of the earth, and it still a thriving platform. But things got worse for Mac Users as the Mac's marketshare shrank. Major developers who'd written great software for the Mac first, began to give more priority to PC versions - understandably. At the moment developers, for well rehearsed reasons, prefer iOS - it's a huge factor in making it a superior platform. But if marketshare trends continue, they will switch attention to Android first.

 

Apple needs a less expensive smartphone. They showed in the development of the iPod range (which retained market dominance), that they could compete at lower price points than top end - without their products feeling cheap - indeed some of their best designed iPods were in their mid-range nano/mini models.

 

 

(4) To value people by the products they use, or in many cases using the only devices they can afford, shows incredibly shallow

judgment.

 

 

Great post!  Smart, unbiased and logical! 

 

It's one thing to be an Apple fan (which contrary to some opinions, I am and own a few Apple devices my favorite being my 64gb 4g Ipad) and another to be an Apple shareholder.

 

I understand that being an Apple shareholder all things Google, Windows, etc. suck, but come on… they are not the devil on earth (I know that some will actually say they are)

 

As fans we are able to recognize Apples strong points (there are many) but also their weak points (there are many as well). We are able to see how great the Apple environment is but also how great Android is becoming. There is no doubt Android sales are coming up because of the lower price points and advertising but not only. Whether you like it or not it’s becoming a great system. It wasn’t, but now a days it is (I know I’m going to get killed over this comments but what the heck). For me as a consumer looking for a good quality/function/price ratio Android was a pleasant surprise. The Iphone may be great but there is no way I am going to spring for >1000 USD for a 32 Gb unblocked iphone 5  (that’s how much it costs in most countries in Europe). No way!!! As great as it is and in spite  of being the best built phone, IMHO it’s not worth it!!!!!. It’s too expensive!!!  In the US, phones being highly subsidized so with the telecom contract they come out at much “nicer” prices. In many places in Europe (dare I say most) the telecom subsidy represents 30 to 50 USD less which in 1000 bucks is peanuts! Maybe that’s why the iphone has such a market penetration in the US than in the rest of the world.

 

As for the apps, come on… most of the ones that matter are already on Google Play.  

 

 

I sometime wonder how many people here have actually used a recent Andoind phone. Judging by the comments I don’t think there are many. 

post #102 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Not really, given that people consider their Android devices to have far less worth after only one year of use. By the time your two year contract is up, it's completely worthless. 

Not so with an iPhone. 


That's for sure. I'm looking for a used iPhone for my daughter and even 4S / 16 GB models are well over $300-400 in many cases. Heck, even broken ones are well over $200 a lot of times. I had hoped to find a broken one for $50 or so and then pay Apple the $200 replacement fee, but that doesn't seem possible.

OTOH, when she lost her Android phone, I looked on the Internet and could have bought a replacement for under $50.
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

And some former iPhone users are getting Samsungs because they're not that bad. Where I work the iPhone is still the dominant device, but a few people have switched. I haven't spoken to any of them about it at length yet, but their reasons for switching included things like preferring the bigger screen, liking how Android lets you customize things like "shortcuts" on the home screen that iOS doesn't, and the contract they wanted was not offered with the iPhone.

"a few" is the key phrase. Another report on this site shows that well over 90% of iPhone users stay with the iPhone - an incredible retention rate and far above anyone else out there.
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post #103 of 176

Does anyone take into consideration how many androids are given away?

A couple weeks back Verizon was giving away 2 for 1 family plan startup.

Apple sells every single iPhone on its market.

Seems like a false lead.

post #104 of 176
hmmm, I thought I was perma-banned...

yay
post #105 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

And some former iPhone users are getting Samsungs because they're not that bad. Where I work the iPhone is still the dominant device, but a few people have switched. I haven't spoken to any of them about it at length yet, but their reasons for switching included things like preferring the bigger screen, liking how Android lets you customize things like "shortcuts" on the home screen that iOS doesn't, and the contract they wanted was not offered with the iPhone.

 

My daughter has a Galaxy and it's a perfectly good smartphone. The screen looks fine, and the battery life is comparable to my iPhone 4.

According to Apple]['s post earlier your daughter and my parents are low-income trash...

post #106 of 176
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post
hmmm, I thought I was perma-banned...
yay

 

Fixed.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #107 of 176

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 3/15/13 at 9:53am
post #108 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


Swapping "Apple" and "Android" there it reads with equal truth.

 

The bottom line is that both are here to stay. 

 

No matter how many fans make angry posts in obscure corners of the 'net like this one, any single vendor will sell fewer units than multiple vendors.  We saw this with Macs vs PCs, and we're seeing it again with iPhone vs Android.  Nothing anyone writes here will change this fundamental dynamic.

 

More importantly, it doesn't matter.  Apple has carved out for itself the high-end demographic, fulfilling the plan Jobs hinted for the company even while he was still at NeXT.

 

Apple's doing fine.  Android's doing fine.

 

The only people who aren't doing fine are those who don't want consumers to have a choice.  But fortunately for everyone else, that ain't

happening.

 

True, so true!!!

post #109 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by brantdevlin View Post

Does anyone take into consideration how many androids are given away?

A couple weeks back Verizon was giving away 2 for 1 family plan startup.

Apple sells every single iPhone on its market.

 

So what? What difference does it make how users get their phones? It's a good way to gain a larger base of users, from which Google gathers larger pools of data that they leverage into more money from advertising and usage reports.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by brantdevlin View Post

Seems like a false lead.

 

I dunno, seems like a working plan to me.

post #110 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by brantdevlin View Post

Does anyone take into consideration how many androids are given away?

A couple weeks back Verizon was giving away 2 for 1 family plan startup.

Apple sells every single iPhone on its market.

Seems like a false lead.

They're not given away any more than iPhones are given away. The service providers pay for them, and bury the costs in the contract.

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post #111 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

No matter how many fans make angry posts in obscure corners of the 'net like this one, any single vendor will sell fewer units than multiple vendors.  We saw this with Macs vs PCs

 

...and VHS vs. Beta before that. That particular market force killed the technically-superior Beta format while VHS thrived, and we almost lost the Mac in the '90s. One dismisses the risk of lost market share at their own peril.

post #112 of 176

The Android market share numbers are not really cause for concern. Outside of the 1st world, Android sale are largely irrelevant. In the 1st World, they mostly represent new smartphone users who don't understand what they are getting into, don't realize there are real differences between phones, and get Android phones pushed on them by fast talking carrier sale people. (Sure, there are a few tech geeks who are rabidly into Android, but their actual numbers are so tiny as to be of no consequence.) In tablets, Android isn't even a significant player, so irrelevant.

 

These people do not get invested in the Google/Android ecosystem in any significant way that hinders their switching, and in large numbers they are switching, as their contracts come up for renewal, to iPhone. This is happening with every Android user I know but for a tiny handful of geeks who think they are cool rooting their phones. Just today, I found out another one I know switched. A person who always talked about how great their Android phone was. (Confirmation bias, obviously.) And not only did they buy an iPhone, they bought an iPad mini at the same time. Now they talk like they always had an iPhone, about how great it is to Face Time with their niece.

 

It may come as a surprise to many of you, but I don't go around trying to convert these people to Apple users. I just observe what they are using and how they use it. Although, pretty soon it seems, if I don't significantly expand the circle of my acquaintance, I'm not going to know any Android users.

 

Android may well find it's ascendancy ephemeral because the platform just doesn't seem to be able to hold users.

post #113 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Yet, how do you explain that far fewer developers have apps for Android?

Standard Fandroid answer: "Users probably change the user agent on their browsers!"

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #114 of 176
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
Standard Fandroid answer: "Users probably change the user agent on their browsers!"

 

Dang, I just saw a neat one yesterday and was going to screenshot it, but I can't find it anymore.

 

It was something like "Mozilla/5.1 (DDDDDDDDDD DDD DDDDDDDDD) DDDDDDD; DDDDD D DD DDDDDDDD".

 

Wasn't a spambot; they're not smart enough to do that. lol.gif

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #115 of 176

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 3/15/13 at 10:03am
post #116 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

I love this forum.  [a lot of stuff entirely irrelevant to the point]

 

Besides not believing your tablet numbers (and it's kind of funny because, in other threads, the iOS web usage advantage is explained away by Apple's tablet dominance, so here we see them arguing both sides), nothing in your post addressed the issue that people just don't stick to Android, and, thus, their sales growth is likely to collapse as people try it for their first smartphone, after being talked into it by the carrier, and then increasingly reject it for their next.

post #117 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Besides not believing your tablet numbers (and it's kind of funny because, in other threads, the iOS web usage advantage is explained away by Apple's tablet dominance, so here we see them arguing both sides), nothing in your post addressed the issue that people just don't stick to Android, and, thus, their sales growth is likely to collapse as people try it for their first smartphone, after being talked into it by the carrier, and then increasingly reject it for their next.

You won't believe his numbers and then you make a claim without even providing any numbers at all. That's about part for the course I'd say.

Regarding the claim of user retention,do you have any evidence of that? The only numbers I've seen that are even remotely applicable are user satisfaction surveys but that doesn't equate to user retention for the entire platform.
post #118 of 176

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 3/15/13 at 10:03am
post #119 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post


You won't believe his numbers and then you make a claim without even providing any numbers at all. That's about part for the course I'd say.
Regarding the claim of user retention,do you have any evidence of that? The only numbers I've seen that are even remotely applicable are user satisfaction surveys but that doesn't equate to user retention for the entire platform.

 

You need to actually, you know, read the thread, then you won't be asking silly questions like your second paragraph.

 

I don't believe his numbers because they're at odds with any meaningful measure that could verify them. They claim to be ownership numbers, but they are contradicted by web usage stats, and no I don't believe every Android user changes their user agent (yeah, right). They might possibly be in line with "shipped numbers" but we know there's a lot of channel stuffing in the Android channels and the actual sales are quite smooth. I also just don't see anyone in the wild with Android tablets, and, frankly, I wouldn't be surprised to find that the Kindle Fire outsells all Android tablets combined. So, no, I don't believe the numbers he posted are accurate. If you think they are, feel free to provide a defense of them.

post #120 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

...except that its market share keeps growing.

 

Because lots of people are still buying their first smartphone. Android's troubles begin when all those users have been churned through. Apple's sales keep growing too, so it's not like people have stopped buying iPhones. The point is that, from what I've seen, Android is simply unable to retain users, and, "its market share keeps growing," doesn't address that issue.

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