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Updated FTC laws require parental OK for apps to collect children's personal info

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced on Wednesday changes to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act that aim to protect personal information about children, with liability extending to mobile applications, but not entire platforms like Apple's iOS App Store.

FTC


The adopted amendments to COPPA are designed to strengthen privacy protections for minors and will also give parents greater control over personal information that websites and online services can collect from children under 13.

The changes were made as a result of a review initiated by the FTC in 2010 to ensure that COPPA keeps up with evolving technology and changes in the way children use the Internet. In particular, the FTC was interested in how increased use of mobile devices and social networking can affect children.

The list of personal information that cannot be collected from children under 13 now includes geolocation information, photos and videos. Companies have also been offered a streamlined, voluntary and transparent approval process for new ways of getting parental consent.

The updated law also notes that Apple's App Store and Google Play for Android are not defined as "operators," meaning the new rules do not require Apple or Google to police their own storefronts for potential violations. The FTC said the App Store and Google play are exempt because they "merely offer the public access to child-directed apps."

However, the FTC did say in a statement issued last week that both Apple and Google need to take responsibility for enhanced transparency on their mobile application stores. The FTC feels there is little to no information available to parents regarding the collection and transmission of data from applications targeted at children.

In a statement issued Wednesday, FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz said the commission will continue to prioritize children's online privacy in an "ever-changing technological landscape.

"I am confident that the amendments to the COPPA Rule strike the right balance between protecting innovation that will provide rich and engaging content for children, and ensuring that parents are informed and involved in their children's online activities," Leibowitz said.
post #2 of 8

Awesome. This is just good stuff.

 

Now how about a law that requires our OK for Google to collect anyone's info? 

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #3 of 8
I think it's great that they are putting liability in the hands of the developers not the stores. However it's too easy for kids to lie so perhaps the law needs to be that any application labeled as suitable for ages under 13 simply can't access or ask for said info. And all apps must state in their store info what personal information they need/want

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #4 of 8

Only Congress can change COPPA.  The FTC can change rules that fall within the scope of that law.

post #5 of 8
This is awesome!

I also agree that a full block on data collection for apps aimed at children 13 and under is the best solution.
post #6 of 8
I don't understand how this will suddenly be a great news. Really? How many children use iPhones that are passed on to them by their parents and have accounts that aren't technically those of the children? I mean, how does the FTC think the whole thing would really work?
post #7 of 8
Originally Posted by dpnorton82 View Post

This is awesome!
I also agree that a full block on data collection for apps aimed at children 13 and under is the best solution.

 

The problem with this is that app makers can just say their apps are NOT aimed at children, even if they are.  Remember Joe Camel?

Wikipedia Quote:
In 1991, the Journal of the American Medical Association published a study showing that by age six nearly as many children could correctly respond that "Joe Camel" was associated with cigarettes as could respond that the Disney Channel logo was associated with Mickey Mouse, and alleged that the "Joe Camel" campaign was targeting children,[2] despite R. J. Reynolds' contention that the campaign had been researched only among adults and was directed only at the smokers of other brands.

 

 

 

Originally Posted by jpadhiyar View Post

I don't understand how this will suddenly be a great news. Really? How many children use iPhones that are passed on to them by their parents and have accounts that aren't technically those of the children? I mean, how does the FTC think the whole thing would really work?

 

LOTS of children use iPhones passed down to them from their parents.  Your last question is a good one, but I think TS's post (quoted below) hints at the reason this is a good law.  It at least starts pushing at the edges.  What we need are COPPA-ish laws for everyone!  The amount of personal data gathered every day by Google (and it's not just Google) is staggering, and most of it is done without the consent, or even understanding of the users/victims.  It needs to stop.

 


Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Awesome. This is just good stuff.

 

Now how about a law that requires our OK for Google to collect anyone's info? 

No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #8 of 8

Haven't y'all ever gone to your Google Dashboard and/or Ad Preferences Manager to see and control what info they store about you?

 

You can turn storage off, modify settings, and even edit what your ad profile is.  

 

For example, I just removed "watercraft" from my preferred interest categories,  and corrected my age group (they guessed younger).    

 

A while back, I noticed that they had a lot of personal voiceprints stored from my previous Google Voice Searches, and after some thought, decided to leave them stored, because it helps Google recognize my voice so well.

 

We seem to have more control over the details of what Google stores about us, than what Apple stores.   Does Apple have a control dashboard where we can fine tune and/or edit what they know or have guessed about us?


Edited by KDarling - 12/24/12 at 7:54pm
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