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Apple's 2013 Macs rumored to include 802.11ac 'Gigabit Wi-Fi' - Page 2

post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

I said that 802.11 a is on IOS devices, it is not on Mac devices, it probably will be on Mac in 2013, but jumping to 802.11 ac would be hard for it, both types of devices(Mac and IOS) might not see it until 2014. But this ac could be seen in 2013.
Was that enough English.(my main language)
post #42 of 57
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post
I said that 802.11 a is on IOS devices, it is not on Mac devices, it probably will be on Mac in 2013…

 

I don't think you understand what 802.11a is. Macs have ALWAYS had it. It was the first Wi-Fi.

 

1000

 

802.11ac is likely this year for Macs. iDevices will get it later, just like n.

Originally posted by Relic

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post #43 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

I said that 802.11 a is on IOS devices, it is not on Mac devices, it probably will be on Mac in 2013, but jumping to 802.11 ac would be hard for it, both types of devices(Mac and IOS) might not see it until 2014. But this ac could be seen in 2013.

1) It's one thing to not know better but to keep spelling it as '802.11 a' is annoying. It certainly doesn't help help express any level of comprehension on the matter, especially on a tech forum.

2) All Macs have 802.11a. It's been included since as long as they've had the 5GHz band.

3) It's odd that you'd think the HW is in PMPs and handsets but not PCs. This makes me wonder about your critical thinking as well as your ability to do any research before drawing a conclusion. It's not like you didn't have plenty of time to question your preconceived notions before responding.

4) You have no basis for 802.11ac being hard to implement on Macs regardless of whether it currently has 802.11a or not. 802.11ac is not some addendum to 802.11a. 'a' is the first of the 802.11 protocols whilst 'ac' comes after 'a' through 'z' have been exhausted and and they start again with a second letter. It's BASE-26 which means the letter has barring on whether the protocol can be added to future devices or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

Was that enough English.(my main language)

No, not really. See above.
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/4/13 at 11:01am

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #44 of 57

While I'm crossing my fingers for 811 ac, if you want a $0 approach to improving your WiFi network performance, I just made one of these "ghetto Wi-Fi boosters" tonight out of a soda can and got two more bars of signal strength from one end of my house to the other:


http://www.tvkim.com/watch/1417/kim-on-komand-beer-can-helps-increase-wi-fi-coverage
 

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post #45 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I don't think you understand what 802.11a is. Macs have ALWAYS had it. It was the first Wi-Fi.

1000


802.11ac is likely this year for Macs. iDevices will get it later, just like n.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) It's one thing to not know better but to keep spelling it as '802.11 a' is annoying. It certainly doesn't help help express any level of comprehension on the matter, especially on a tech forum.
2) All Macs have 802.11a. It's been included since as long as they've had the 5GHz band.
3) It's odd that you'd think the HW is in PMPs and handsets but not PCs. This makes me wonder about your critical thinking as well as your ability to do any research before drawing a conclusion. It's not like you didn't have plenty of time to question your preconceived notions before responding.
4) You have no basis for 802.11ac being hard to implement on Macs regardless of whether it currently has 802.11a or not. 802.11ac is not some addendum to 802.11a. 'a' is the first of the 802.11 protocols whilst 'ac' comes after 'a' through 'z' have been exhausted and and they start again with a second letter. It's BASE-26 which means the letter has barring on whether the protocol can be added to future devices or not.
No, not really. See above.
Sorry, I always figured 802.11 a, would've the last one before 802.11 ac, apparently not.
I have always thought there would be more mention if 802.11 a on a Mac, I believed it hit IOS first because they are updated well more (6-18 months vs 12- so many years[excluding iPod touch], it was weird it did not be on 2012 macs but I thought hay IOS sells a lot quicker.
The 802.11 ac I hoped for 2013, I just thought that it would come after 802.11 not with but I stand corrected it is already in macs, as said I believe IOS would get it quickly after Mac since in a huge market. And we'll there is your English, that is what was needed.
post #46 of 57
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post
Sorry, I always figured 802.11 a, would've the last one before 802.11 ac, apparently not.

 

They're wrapping around with letters, treating them as numbers. Think of it like a spreadsheet: when you hit column Z and want to add another one, it adds column AA. The bold A is in the "tens" place. When you hit AZ, it "increments" to BA.


I have always thought there would be more mention if 802.11 a on a Mac, I believed it hit IOS first because they are updated well more (6-18 months vs 12- so many years[excluding iPod touch], it was weird it did not be on 2012 macs but I thought hay IOS sells a lot quicker.

 

I was hoping for ac by now, too (you meant ac here, right?), but new tech like this is always going to debut on Macs first because of the changes in power draw required. 802.11n was on Macs for… two(?) years before it hit iOS devices, and that gave the chips time to shrink and use less power. The same will be true of 802.11ac and beyond.

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post #47 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

They're wrapping around with letters, treating them as numbers. Think of it like a spreadsheet: when you hit column Z and want to add another one, it adds column AA. The bold A is in the "tens" place. When you hit AZ, it "increments" to BA.

I was hoping for ac by now, too (you meant ac here, right?), but new tech like this is always going to debut on Macs first because of the changes in power draw required. 802.11n was on Macs for… two(?) years before it hit iOS devices, and that gave the chips time to shrink and use less power. The same will be true of 802.11ac and beyond.
Ok that makes sense the order now, I till now figured the letters stood for something like b=bypassed or something, a=accelerated, ac=accelerated ,c=(type of bandwidth). But it apparently does not.
Ok that makes sense, but hopefully we will see ac, on all wifi apple devices by January 1, 2015.obviously reduced to a year or so. But how come 802.11 a is only on iPhone 5 as stated here.It sounds like it has been on macs for years.http://www.apple.com/iphone/compare-iphones/
post #48 of 57
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post
But how come 802.11 a is only on iPhone 5 as stated here.It sounds like it has been on macs for years.http://www.apple.com/iphone/compare-iphones/

 

OH! I see. I'd say its because the iPhone 5 has a new chip in it? A different one from the other models that also includes 802.11a by happy chance. 

 

I can see how that'd be confusing now. But no one uses a anymore. Or if they do, they're somewhere that they're not gonna have iPhones in the first place.

 

Yeah, if you look at, like, third party routers and what have you, you'll even see 802.11a omitted these days, and that's just due to age.

Originally posted by Relic

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Originally posted by Relic

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post #49 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

Ok that makes sense the order now, I till now figured the letters stood for something like b=bypassed or something, a=accelerated, ac=accelerated ,c=(type of bandwidth). But it apparently does not.
Ok that makes sense, but hopefully we will see ac, on all wifi apple devices by January 1, 2015.obviously reduced to a year or so. But how come 802.11 a is only on iPhone 5 as stated here.It sounds like it has been on macs for years.http://www.apple.com/iphone/compare-iphones/

All this bellyaching and you never once looked up what you were complaining about? If this was a class room I'd have to give you an F, which comes after A, B, C, and D. You're still choosing not to spell it correctly for some reason. It's like you're going out of your way to be thick.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #50 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

OH! I see. I'd say its because the iPhone 5 has a new chip in it? A different one from the other models that also includes 802.11a by happy chance. 

I can see how that'd be confusing now. But no one uses a anymore. Or if they do, they're somewhere that they're not gonna have iPhones in the first place.

Yeah, if you look at, like, third party routers and what have you, you'll even see 802.11a omitted these days, and that's just due to age.

That is actually a technical question but it's also one I answered previously. The reason 802.11a is now on the iPhone is because the iPhone now includes the 5GHz band, which also now allows for 802.11n at both 2.4 and 5GHz.

Let me reiterate a 3rd time since my words are apparently now being understood by some. 802.11b/g/n are on the 2.4GHz band and the 802.11a/n are on the 5GHz band. In other words, if you don't have the 5GHz band in your wireless chip you can't possibly have 802.11a.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #51 of 57

Now I'm jumping completely away; my response below is not to be construed with applying to any user here.

 

Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
All this bellyaching and you never once looked up what you were complaining about? If this was a class room I'd have to give you an F…

 

You can't do that anymore. People have to be handheld. You cannot expect them to do any work on their own. You are an idiot for suggesting this.

 

Not sarcasm; that's the reality in which I (at least) live. And I fight it tooth and nail. 

Originally posted by Relic

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Originally posted by Relic

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post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

Ok that makes sense the order now, I till now figured the letters stood for something like b=bypassed or something, a=accelerated, ac=accelerated ,c=(type of bandwidth). But it apparently does not.
Ok that makes sense, but hopefully we will see ac, on all wifi apple devices by January 1, 2015.obviously reduced to a year or so. But how come 802.11 a is only on iPhone 5 as stated here.It sounds like it has been on macs for years.http://www.apple.com/iphone/compare-iphones/

The numbers and letters stand for the IEEE task group that did the work. Cool naming is done by marketing, not engineering teams. Cool naming also only serves to confuse - 2G, 3G, 4G, 4G LTE, WTH? - you get the idea; probably by design.
post #53 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

OH! I see. I'd say its because the iPhone 5 has a new chip in it? A different one from the other models that also includes 802.11a by happy chance. 

I can see how that'd be confusing now. But no one uses a anymore. Or if they do, they're somewhere that they're not gonna have iPhones in the first place.

Yeah, if you look at, like, third party routers and what have you, you'll even see 802.11a omitted these days, and that's just due to age.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That is actually a technical question but it's also one I answered previously. The reason 802.11a is now on the iPhone is because the iPhone now includes the 5GHz band, which also now allows for 802.11n at both 2.4 and 5GHz.
Let me reiterate a 3rd time since my words are apparently now being understood by some. 802.11b/g/n are on the 2.4GHz band and the 802.11a/n are on the 5GHz band. In other words, if you don't have the 5GHz band in your wireless chip you can't possibly have 802.11a.
That makes total sense about it, I was assuming off.
post #54 of 57
what routers support this? So im guessing if the chips are still in development then the routers arent out yet? So if we want faster speeds we will need a new mac and a new router
post #55 of 57
Originally Posted by tkrunner1738 View Post
what routers support this? So im guessing if the chips are still in development then the routers arent out yet?

 

No, there are some, what Logitech? routers that already have 802.11ac.


So if we want faster speeds we will need a new mac and a new router

 

Well, yeah.

Originally posted by Relic

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Originally posted by Relic

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post #56 of 57
I wish Apple would update the firmware of the Time Capsule to have Cloud capabilities. I want to be able to utilize it not only for back ups but for file storage so i can stream stuff to my iOS devices. The firmware should also allow you to allocate the space you want to set aside on the HD for the back up and not just have the entire volume used for that purpose. I only need to have 1 most recent copy of my laptop backed up. I don't need multiple versions of the files backed up.
post #57 of 57

Imagine 10 Gbps internet over Thunderbolt 😻

 

 


Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

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Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

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