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Apple says New Year's 'Do Not Disturb' bug will fix itself Jan. 7

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
Apple has posted a support document on its website, informing users that a bug with the "Do Not Disturb" feature in iOS 6 will automatically be resolved after Jan. 7.

The document, published on Wednesday, acknowledges the "symptom" of the problem, in which the Do Not Disturb mode stays on past its scheduled end time. The bug went into effect with the start of the new year on Tuesday.

"Do Not Disturb scheduling feature will resume normal functionality after January 7, 2013," Apple's document reads. "Before this date, you should manually turn the Do Not Disturb feature on or off."



Users can manually switch the automatic feature of Do Not Disturb on or off by opening the iOS Settings application, choosing "Notifications," then "Do Not Disturb," and switching "Scheduled." Until next Monday, Jan. 7, the feature will not auto-enable or disable as it has done since the launch of iOS 6 in September.

The timing of the bug is noteworthy as Apple released an ad on New Years Day to tout the Do Not Disturb function as a key feature of the iPhone 5. The ad features tennis players Venus and Serena Williams playing ping-pong in a dream against a narrator, voiced by actor Jeff Daniels.

The iPhone has a history of New Year's bugs, with another issue arising at the start of 2011 that prevented non-repeating alarms from ringing. When the bug became known, Apple suggested that users set recurring alarms until Jan. 3 of that year, when the alarms automatically began working again properly.
post #2 of 46
"Do Not Disturb" scheduler is probably taking a new years vacation. Give him a break!
post #3 of 46
It should be Jeff Goldblum. Remember those ads?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #4 of 46
I wonder what causes this bug.

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post #5 of 46
so will it appear next new year's if you don't upgrade?

Sounds like 'DO NOT DISTURB -GATE' to me. 1smile.gif
post #6 of 46
Sounds so strange haha
post #7 of 46
Why does technology have so much trouble with our arbitrary and inconsistent manner of defining time?
post #8 of 46
I'm surprised that the statement from Apple wasn't something more like "this is a bug that will fix itself on January 7 and we will be fixing it as quickly as possible with our next software update as well." Just saying that the problem will go away on its own on the seventh kind of implies that they don't think it's a huge issue and they're not immediately working on a fix, which I'm sure they are, but they really should make that clear.
post #9 of 46

"NotAlertedWhenGirlfriendIsAngryAndIsAboutToKillYouGate"

post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by einsteinbqat View Post

I wonder what causes this bug.
If (date < jan-07 && date > dec-31)
{ fail; }

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Why does technology have so much trouble with our arbitrary and inconsistent manner of defining time?

 

I imagine that this was meant tongue-in-cheek, but the fact is that robust date libraries are readily available and, no doubt, used by other portions of iOS.

 

The common cause of these issues are new/naive coders who aren't aware of the libraries they should be using, and thus try to do the calculations themselves (and, almost universally, incorrectly).

post #12 of 46

Does this mean iOS 6.1 around the corner?

post #13 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by einsteinbqat View Post

I wonder what causes this bug.

 

Poor coding and testing.

 

-kpluck

Do you use MagicJack?

The default settings will automatically charge your credit card each year for service renewal. You will not be notified or warned in anyway. You can turn auto renewal off.

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Do you use MagicJack?

The default settings will automatically charge your credit card each year for service renewal. You will not be notified or warned in anyway. You can turn auto renewal off.

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post #14 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

I imagine that this was meant tongue-in-cheek, but the fact is that robust date libraries

The common cause of these issues are new/naive coders who aren't aware of the libraries they should be using, and thus try to do the calculations themselves (and, almost universally, incorrectly).

Hm. Does this point to sloppy work on SE level? I would expect this to be caught here.
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #15 of 46

This is a non-issue, people complaining are whiners.

 

Do Not Disturb being on doesn't mean you can't use your phone.

 

It works fine for me.

 

Fandroids trashing Apple over this should go away.

 

This is another media sensation just because it's Apple, it's a manufactured issue created to get more traffic and ad clicks.

 

People who claim they are experiencing this are lying and should go away and buy another crappy Android phone.

 

Well, that about covers the issue here on this site.

post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by techguy911 View Post

This is a non-issue, people complaining are whiners.

Do Not Disturb being on doesn't mean you can't use your phone.

It works fine for me.

Fandroids trashing Apple over this should go away.

This is another media sensation just because it's Apple, it's a manufactured issue created to get more traffic and ad clicks.

People who claim they are experiencing this are lying and should go away and buy another crappy Android phone.

Well, that about covers the issue here on this site.

You joking?

It's a stupid bug. I can't even think how it could happen. I mean I know why someone could mess up a transition to daylight saving, still a bug but its possible to use the non-dsl date in code ( useful sometimes). This makes no sense unless a disgruntled programmer deliberately programmed it.
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

I'm surprised that the statement from Apple wasn't something more like "this is a bug that will fix itself on January 7 and we will be fixing it as quickly as possible with our next software update as well." Just saying that the problem will go away on its own on the seventh kind of implies that they don't think it's a huge issue and they're not immediately working on a fix, which I'm sure they are, but they really should make that clear.

No it pretty much implies that it'll go away on it's on and doesn't need to be fixed (until Jan 1-6 2013 happens again).  Does make you wonder how this particular bug was introduced.

post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

 

Poor coding and testing.

 

-kpluck

 

Like you could do better.

post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Like you could do better.

Most coders could do better.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


You joking?
It's a stupid bug. I can't even think how it could happen. I mean I know why someone could mess up a transition to daylight saving, still a bug but its possible to use the non-dsl date in code ( useful sometimes). This makes no sense unless a disgruntled programmer deliberately programmed it.

 

If a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazon could it cause rain in Africa? One bit or stack modified way over there could start the dominoes falling. Why do you think it takes so long for some bug fixes to be released? Fix a bug over here and it causes another bug over there sometimes. 

post #21 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


Most coders could do better.

 

I sincerely doubt it.

post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

I sincerely doubt it.

Well you don't know much. The low level API handle this, the bug is very very odd.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

If a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazon could it cause rain in Africa? One bit or stack modified way over there could start the dominoes falling. Why do you think it takes so long for some bug fixes to be released? Fix a bug over here and it causes another bug over there sometimes. 

Software engineering isn't chaotic in the mathematical sense, and a bug in a higher level component does not propagate to other higher level components. If the Apple API ( NSDate) is faulty then it would manifest in other components and higher level functions like the clock and reminders etc.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #24 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


Well you don't know much. The low level API handle this, the bug is very very odd.

 

Like you know anything about it. Stop pretending you know what you are talking about.

post #25 of 46
I wonder how it's gonna fix itself on 7-th of January. But what if it won't, what then Apple is going to say?
post #26 of 46

We measure a "year" according to the duration of the earth making a complete orbit of the sun and that duration is slowing down (albeit minutely), therefore we measure that duration in "days." However, "days" are measured by the duration of the earth making one complete rotation on its axis and that rotation is slowing down as well. Therefore we measure our days in seconds. We have been adding "leap seconds" and "leap days" when required to keep our measurement of time in allignment with the position of the earth in relation to the sun (while largely neglecting lunar events at all).

 

All this adjustment is really to keep the peasants (read: all of us) happy and not confuse us about what "time" it is. I wish we could move off the current calendar that was inspired in BCE and move to a more accurate and modern device.

 

I feel bad for the software engineers that have to write code that recalls all the colloquial names we have for the time we keep.

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When a company stops chasing profit and start chasing the betterment of their products, services, workforce, and customers, that will be the most valuable company in the world.
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post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by greybeard View Post

I wonder how it's gonna fix itself on 7-th of January. But what if it won't, what then Apple is going to say?

 

Obviously, they know exactly what's causing it, and they know it's going to stop being a problem on that date.

post #28 of 46
I blame Forstall.
post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


Software engineering isn't chaotic in the mathematical sense, and a bug in a higher level component does not propagate to other higher level components. If the Apple API ( NSDate) is faulty then it would manifest in other components and higher level functions like the clock and reminders etc.

 

NSDate is pretty archaic in its logic but I've never experienced any bugs with it. I agree with you - why is only Apple experiencing yearly date bugs and not third party developers?

 

It's an odd situation.

post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Like you know anything about it. Stop pretending you know what you are talking about.

i do know the API - the API is public. And I know more than you.

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post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by greybeard View Post

I wonder how it's gonna fix itself on 7-th of January. But what if it won't, what then Apple is going to say?

 

Obviously, they know exactly what's causing it, and they know it's going to stop being a problem on that date.

 

It's easy to test by putting the phone into airplane mode and manually setting the time, and Apple appear to be correct. Up until Monday, Jan 7 2013 the do not disturb mode does not switch off at the scheduled time, but starting on Jan 7 it begins to behave correctly again.

 

However, next year the bug reappears, and corrects on Monday, Jan 6, 2014. Must be something to do with the first Monday in January. Presumably they expect to fix it with an update before then.

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by einsteinbqat View Post

I wonder what causes this bug.

To the best of my understand this bug is caused by 2012 being a leap year.

Basically how many pieces of software keep track of daily schedules is by knowing what week of the year it is. So since we had a leap year we had an extra day which meant on Monday technically it was week 53 of 2012. And Tuesday was week 0 of 2013.

Next Monday would start a new week thus having an actual week number and fixing the issue.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadrian View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by einsteinbqat View Post

I wonder what causes this bug.

To the best of my understand this bug is caused by 2012 being a leap year.

Basically how many pieces of software keep track of daily schedules is by knowing what week of the year it is. So since we had a leap year we had an extra day which meant on Monday technically it was week 53 of 2012. And Tuesday was week 0 of 2013.

Next Monday would start a new week thus having an actual week number and fixing the issue.

 

Except that doesn't explain why it reappears in 2014. And when it is based on time of day, why does it care about the week number?

post #34 of 46
But why does it seems like it is only Apple that is having new year bug?
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadrian View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by einsteinbqat View Post

I wonder what causes this bug.

To the best of my understand this bug is caused by 2012 being a leap year.

Basically how many pieces of software keep track of daily schedules is by knowing what week of the year it is. So since we had a leap year we had an extra day which meant on Monday technically it was week 53 of 2012. And Tuesday was week 0 of 2013.

Next Monday would start a new week thus having an actual week number and fixing the issue.

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iMac mid 2011 • 27 in • 3,4 GHz Core i7 • 32 GB RAM • AMD Radeon HD 6970M 2GB VRAM

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post #35 of 46
Oh here we go A new feature in IOS 6 is not functioning right. This feature seems like a improved silent switch.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

 

I imagine that this was meant tongue-in-cheek, but the fact is that robust date libraries are readily available and, no doubt, used by other portions of iOS.

 

The common cause of these issues are new/naive coders who aren't aware of the libraries they should be using, and thus try to do the calculations themselves (and, almost universally, incorrectly).

 

You don't think that all code changes are vetted by at least two programmers and testing is done? You seem to have a negative view on programmers in general.

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

 

If a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazon could it cause rain in Africa? One bit or stack modified way over there could start the dominoes falling. Why do you think it takes so long for some bug fixes to be released? Fix a bug over here and it causes another bug over there sometimes. 

UNIT. TESTING.

post #38 of 46

more like:

 

if(week > 52){

exit;

}

post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

You saw their code? So, no, you don't know any more than I do. Less actually, since I at least know you have no idea what you are talking about and you don't.

 

A developer can take an educated guess at how the functionality is implemented. A lot of software problems have a single sensible solution (and that's why software patents are bad). Either Apple has used NSDate (as stated - a public and widely used API) or has reinvented in the wheel. The former seems more likely, though the latter would explain why Apple has been the victim of so many end-of-year bugs.

post #40 of 46

wonder if its anything along the lines of Decimal 31 (Dec-31) is equal to Octal 37. Extra 6 units there, so the fix is on the 7th day 

 

or maybe not... long shot

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