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Apple applies for iOS 'Notification Center' patent years after Google's 'Notification Bar'

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
A filing published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday reveals that Apple is looking to patent the iOS Notification Center, a feature similar to Google's Notification Bar which allows mobile device users to keep tabs on a multitude of apps from a central hub.

Notification Center
Source: USPTO


Apple's application, titled "Systems and methods for displaying notification received from multiple applications," offers an outline of a system that can receive and aggregate "notifications" or alerts from a number of apps within iOS.

As with many other operations level iOS features, Notification Center is the result of an ongoing effort to create a more inviting and intuitive experience for the end user. In this case, however, many believe that Apple cribbed the functionality from Google's Android OS which implemented a very similar notification system before Notification Center was introduced in iOS 5. The internet search giant actually filed its own patent application for what it calls "Notification Bar" in 2009, some two years prior to Apple's "Notification Center" filing.

Most recently, Samsung sued Apple in South Korea, alleging the iOS Notification Center infringes on active patents. Not much information has been made available in the reported suit, though the "active patent" is believed to be related to Google's Notification Bar.

Google's Notification Bar
Illustration from Google's Notification Bar patent application.


Before iOS 5, Apple's mobile operating system had no "central hub" to which apps could send messages and notifications. Examples would be push notifications from messaging apps, new emails and alerts from reminder apps, all of which would have to be found by the user through a manual search of the graphical user interface.

From the application's background:

Because electronic devices can contain many applications, the potential for application-based notifications can become numerous and unwieldy, particularly if a user is required to access each application individually in order to view application-specific notifications. Accordingly, what is needed is a more efficient and intuitive approach for organizing notifications and providing users with instant access to these notifications.


In Apple's solution, a central "notification module" can interface with a plurality of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) while the device is either locked or unlocked and present the messages or alerts to the user according to a customizable display scheme. As seen in the current iteration of Notification Center, users can select which apps are granted access, the amount of notifications that are displayed and how they are presented on screen.

For example, notifications from an instant messaging app can be displayed in a pop-up window that requires user intervention to dismiss, or banner that temporarily takes over the top of the screen and disappears within a few seconds. The system can be further refined to present a set number of messages as well as where those messages appear in the Notification Center's hierarchy.

Banners
Illustration of banner notifications.


The Notification Center window is a scrollable list that sections alerts from multiple apps into panes, a number of which can be made into permanent "widgets" that display data from Apple's weather and stock apps. Users can access the centralized hub at anytime, even if the device is running another app.

Widgets
Example of static weather widget (608) and stock stock widget (610).


Other notable assets are badge app icons relating to the number of notifications sent by a given app, the ability to interact with alerts while the phone is locked and context-sensitive slider functions which bring a user directly to a notifying app from the lock screen.

Slide to Unlock
"Slide to Unlock" alternatives as seen in lock screen.


Apple's patent application was first filed in June 2012 and claims the benefit of a provisional application from June 2011, both of which credit Imran A. Chaudhri and Eliza Block as its inventors. The patent application was cross-filed with the World Intellectual Property Organization in 2012.
post #2 of 56

It's all about implementation.

post #3 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

It's all about implementation.


So you're arguing Android doesn't infringe on anything Apple, due to being a different implementation? Good :D

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

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post #4 of 56
To all the people who claim Apple cribbed Android's Notification Bar: WebOS had it first, and Apple hired WebOS's notification engineer. Moreover, you can't get in trouble for taking somebody's work if that work was a derivative of your own copyrighted work. Go ask the guy who wrote an unsolicited screenplay for Rocky 4 and sent it to Stallone in an attempt to get hired. Stallone just took it, made the movie, and didn't pay the guy. The guy sued and the Court ruled that because the guy's work was a derivative of Stallone's work(e.g. Based on character's Stallone created), the guy had no case.
post #5 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post


So you're arguing Android doesn't infringe on anything Apple, due to being a different implementation? Good :D

It's not so simple. Patents are very specific. You have to read the claims to know what the patent protects.

post #6 of 56

Let's be real. If it was the other way around and iOS had the notification center years before Android did, people here would be talking sh-- left and right about Android stealing that idea.

LOL people should just enjoy whatever phone they prefer and stop being d-bags about other phones they don't use. Fanboys are pathetic, regardless of whether they are Android or Apple ones.
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LOL people should just enjoy whatever phone they prefer and stop being d-bags about other phones they don't use. Fanboys are pathetic, regardless of whether they are Android or Apple ones.
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post #7 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuddyRevell View Post

Let's be real. If it was the other way around and iOS had the notification center years before Android did, people here would be talking sh-- left and right about Android stealing that idea.


Not at all.

It's really funny how all the Android shills have no concept of intellectual property. I guess that's why they think it's OK to steal IP so blatantly (look at the Tab which was so close to the iPad in appearance that even Samsung's attorneys couldn't tell the difference).

Here's the way it works:
A patent is not about an idea. Simply saying that two companies have notification devices patented tells you nothing at all about whether one stole from the other. Read the patent - in particular, the claims. The claims will spell out in detail what is being patented. If that patent is awarded, then no one else can practice what is disclosed in the claims of the patent.

Now, Apple has a history of using good ideas. They do NOT, however, have a history of slimy companies like Samsung who infringe patents left and right - and seem to think that other companies' patents are their best source of R&D.

If you have evidence that Apple has infringed a patent, turn it over to the patent owner. And, yes, Apple has lost a few cases like that. But trying to put Apple in the same category as Samsung and Google is absurd. Their entire business models seem to be built on taking others' IP.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #8 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post


So you're arguing Android doesn't infringe on anything Apple, due to being a different implementation? Good :D

 

You know, you aren't doing your cause any favors when you make it so obvious you have no understanding.

post #9 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

To all the people who claim Apple cribbed Android's Notification Bar: WebOS had it first, and Apple hired WebOS's notification engineer. Moreover, you can't get in trouble for taking somebody's work if that work was a derivative of your own copyrighted work. 

WebOS's notification system was(is?) quite intuitive, and at the time still a ways different from how Android handled the pull down shade. Apple may have hired an engineer but Google hired Duarte who was really responsible for and designed the majority of WebOS which clearly shows in the evolution of the Android UI the last year or so. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Not at all.
It's really funny how all the Android shills have no concept of intellectual property. I guess that's why they think it's OK to steal IP so blatantly (look at the Tab which was so close to the iPad in appearance that even Samsung's attorneys couldn't tell the difference).

Relevant to the notification topic how? Oh right, not. Definition of Straw man.  Next.

Quote:
Now, Apple has a history of using good ideas. They do NOT, however, have a history of slimy companies like Samsung who infringe patents left and right - and seem to think that other companies' patents are their best source of R&D.

They certainly don't have a history of willfully infringing no, but they are 'shameless at stealing good ideas'. You're craftily trying to divert attention away from the issue here. iOS had nothing like a notification center before Android exploded, and then suddenly a very similar system, one closer to Android than WebOS. Coincidence I think not. They still are different implementations, and Android's IMO is still much more intuitive. Expandable and swipable notifications, 'clear all', and  no nagging notifications after the app is opened are much easier than that tiny x I have to hit twice and constantly open the weather instead. I wish I had a dollar for every time that happened. Hopefully it improves.

I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
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I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
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post #10 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by chabig View Post

It's not so simple. Patents are very specific. You have to read the claims to know what the patent protects.

Agreed. That's pretty much why I found mdriftmeyer's comment slightly too short to be sensical, and pointed it out.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

You know, you aren't doing your cause any favors when you make it so obvious you have no understanding.

I probably have as good an understanding of the issue as you do. But feel free to behave as conceited and arrogant as you wish, you'll make it obvious you have complete understanding of everything under the sun and beyond, and do a lot of good to your cause.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #11 of 56

Mmm, AppleInsider reckons that Google filed their patent in 2009

 

But Apple filed a notification bar patent on September 11 2008

 

So, I imagine that it really is all down to the implementation.

post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

... but they are 'shameless at stealing good ideas'. 

 

I don't think you know what you are trying to paraphrase means.

post #13 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

... I probably have as good an understanding of the issue as you do. But feel free to behave as conceited and arrogant as you wish, you'll make it obvious you have complete understanding of everything under the sun and beyond, and do a lot of good to your cause.

 

So, you understand it, you were just posting as though you didn't? Ok, glad we cleared that up about you.

post #14 of 56
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post
I don't think you know what you are trying to paraphrase means.

 

Don't bother thinking: he doesn't have the first clue what that means.

post #15 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Don't bother thinking: he doesn't have the first clue what that means.

 

Well, yes, but that's what he wants us to do, not think.

post #16 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

They certainly don't have a history of willfully infringing no, but they are 'shameless at stealing good ideas'.

OK. So you're obviously intent on proving that you don't have any idea how IP works.

Ideas are not protectable. One can't get a patent or a trademark on an idea. One gets a patent on a specific implementation of an idea.

Since ideas are not protectable, they can't really be stolen, anyway.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #17 of 56
Quote: View Post

 

 

WebOS's notification system was(is?) quite intuitive, and at the time still a ways different from how Android handled the pull down shade. Apple may have hired an engineer but Google hired Duarte who was really responsible for and designed the majority of WebOS which clearly shows in the evolution of the Android UI the last year or so. 

 

 

Duarte might have headed up WebOS, but Rich Dellinger was the designer responsible for WebOS's Notification System design. He is at Apple. Apple also hired Peter Hajas, a person who created the popular MobileNotifier program available on Cydia. Apple's Newton Message Pad also had notifications. The issue is more complex than some would lead you to believe. Apple also had a much slower development cycle than Google out of the gate. So it is impossible to know what Apple was working on when Google released its product.

 

Even if Apple did borrow some of Android's ideas, is it really wrong to steal from somebody you think stole from you? Robin Hood is the hero after all. 

post #18 of 56

This patent is obvious. Looking at the notification bar patented by Google, this goes just a little further. Putting all settings on the same page? That's trivial. They won't get this one.

Imagine if everybody patented every invention when computers first appeared...

post #19 of 56
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post
Imagine if everybody patented every invention when computers first appeared...

 

Yeah? What? Are you pretending that would have had some sort of detrimental effect?

post #20 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Yeah? What? Are you pretending that would have had some sort of detrimental effect?

 

It's hard to imagine that it wouldn't have changed things. If Xerox had been more aggressively litigious, Apple might've been in trouble! Xerox certainly had far, far deeper pockets back in the 80s and early 90s.

post #21 of 56
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post
If Xerox had been more aggressively litigious, Apple might've been in trouble! Xerox certainly had far, far deeper pockets back in the 80s and early 90s.

 

Apple bought their tech from Xerox, period. They DID sue and the DID lose. Because Apple did nothing illegal.

post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

Imagine if everybody patented every invention when computers first appeared...

 

Ok, I'm imagining it. I imagine there would have been a lot more innovation a lot faster if it weren't possible to just copy what others had done. 

post #23 of 56

Apple attempts to patent anything and everything they can get their hands on. Since Day 1. It's their policy, and it's very smart. 

post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


OK. So you're obviously intent on proving that you don't have any idea how IP works.
Ideas are not protectable. One can't get a patent or a trademark on an idea. One gets a patent on a specific implementation of an idea.
Since ideas are not protectable, they can't really be stolen, anyway.

Using your reasoning wouldn't that put Android clear of "copying" iOS then? After all the two implementations are hardly the same, tho the ideas behind some of it may be.

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #25 of 56

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/16/13 at 12:12pm
post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

Mmm, AppleInsider reckons that Google filed their patent in 2009

 

But Apple filed a notification bar patent on September 11 2008

 

So, I imagine that it really is all down to the implementation.

Please read the patent - 

"Portable Multifunction Device, Method, and Graphical User Interface for Managing Communications Received While in a Locked State". 

This has nothing to do with notification center. 

post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Not at all.
It's really funny how all the Android shills have no concept of intellectual property. I guess that's why they think it's OK to steal IP so blatantly (look at the Tab which was so close to the iPad in appearance that even Samsung's attorneys couldn't tell the difference).
Here's the way it works:
A patent is not about an idea. Simply saying that two companies have notification devices patented tells you nothing at all about whether one stole from the other. Read the patent - in particular, the claims. The claims will spell out in detail what is being patented. If that patent is awarded, then no one else can practice what is disclosed in the claims of the patent.
Now, Apple has a history of using good ideas. They do NOT, however, have a history of slimy companies like Samsung who infringe patents left and right - and seem to think that other companies' patents are their best source of R&D.
If you have evidence that Apple has infringed a patent, turn it over to the patent owner. And, yes, Apple has lost a few cases like that. But trying to put Apple in the same category as Samsung and Google is absurd. Their entire business models seem to be built on taking others' IP.

 

BS

 

And you know it.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Apple attempts to patent anything and everything they can get their hands on. Since Day 1. It's their policy, and it's very smart. 

Not so smart if you are using the legal system as a base for protection.

 

How about innovating instead of litigating?

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Some here keep writing that Microsoft stole from Apple, but like the case you noted the court favored the defendant:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_vs_microsoft#Court_case

 

The brick wall your argument comes up against is that the fact that Apple didn't steal anything from Xerox doesn't depend on the outcome of a court case, it's based on the fact that they compensated Xerox as part of an agreement approved by both companies. The truth of whether Microsoft stole from Apple, or Google stole from Apple, and they both have, also doesn't depend on a court case. The outcome of the case you mention doesn't show that they didn't steal, it shows they got away with it. Stealing is part of Microsoft's DNA. It's what they've always done, and they've gotten away with it pretty often. It's ironic that, at least early in its life, Google positioned itself as the anti-Microsoft, don't be evil and all that, yet, at core, both companies exhibit pretty much the same values, or lack thereof, depending on how you look at it.

post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

Not so smart if you are using the legal system as a base for protection.

 

How about innovating instead of litigating?

 

How about having a meaningful thought instead of constantly spewing angry cliches?

post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Using your reasoning wouldn't that put Android clear of "copying" iOS then? After all the two implementations are hardly the same, tho the ideas behind some of it may be.

 

As you well know, that depends on exactly what is implemented, not necessarily the code behind it. But nice attempt at obfuscation by conflating those things. Unfortunately for you, your spin just isn't that good.

post #32 of 56

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/16/13 at 12:12pm
post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

To all the people who claim Apple cribbed Android's Notification Bar: WebOS had it first, and Apple hired WebOS's notification engineer. 

 

Can you explain how WebOS had first when Android had it in the SDK on February 2.008 and WebOS was presented on January 2.009?

 

By the way, regarding the notifications, WebOS didn't copy Android and Apple didn't copy Android

post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

 

Can you explain how WebOS had first when Android had it in the SDK on February 2.008 and WebOS was presented on January 2.009?

 

By the way, regarding the notifications, WebOS didn't copy Android and Apple didn't copy Android

 

Don't waste your breath. It's not worth it. Don't you know Steve Jobs thought of it 30 years ago?! Android notification bar is still superior.

post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Stealing is a specific legal allegation, so the court is quite relevant.  Moreover, the outcomes were similar in Apple v MS for similar reasons, because Apple licensed much of their OS to MS, just as Xerox had licensed much of their design to Apple.

 

If you prefer a world where instead of actual definitions we just use whatever definition any of us prefer at a given moment, knock yourself out.

 

There is no point in this post where you are correct.

post #36 of 56

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/16/13 at 12:11pm
post #37 of 56

If this patent is granted an immediate investigation of fraud in the US Patent office would be necessary......

post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post


From the the article I linked to:

If you feel this is incorrect you can apply to edit that page with what you feel are more appropriate citations than the court record, which the article cites as its source.

Irrelevant, because the evidence of your misunderstanding is in the quote you cite. The court looked around and saw that 'everyone' was doing 'it', and therefore Apple's Mac System OS was not an original implementation. Basically they determined that Apple's efforts to make a GUI usable did not demonstrate sufficient innovation, and that anyone else could easily have produced the same result, such as Microsoft Windows 95 which was "almost as good as the Macintosh but even better (paraphrase)".

 

Cheers

post #39 of 56
Before Android or iOS had a notification centre, a jailbreak on iOS had this functionality. Android surely wasn't first to implement the concept.

Google should have kept their original Android concept: http://gizmodo.com/334909/google-android-prototype-in-the-wild?tag=gadgetsandroidhardwareinthewild

Or is that a Blackberry?
post #40 of 56

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 5/16/13 at 12:14pm
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