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Microsoft scoops up home automation company before Apple - Page 3

post #81 of 94
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post
I seem to recall you saying there was no need for it and even that it wouldn't sell.

 

Even the Microsoft Surface has sold units. Obviously everyone was wrong about it¡

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #82 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Even the Microsoft Surface has sold units. Obviously everyone was wrong about it¡

 

I still don't get what you're saying. You seem to be evading the point that you specifically declared there would be no iPad mini or, if there was, it wouldn't sell. This appears to be plainly quite wrong.

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post #83 of 94
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post
This appears to be plainly quite wrong.

 

I'm sorry that you can't understand what I've just said above. You didn't understand the benefits of further home automation, either. 

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #84 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I'm sorry that you can't understand what I've just said above. You didn't understand the benefits of further home automation, either. 

 

How sweet.

 

I could say what I should...but then you're a moderator, so that would work out badly for me.

 

1rolleyes.gif

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post #85 of 94
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post
I could say what I should...but then you're a moderator, so that would work out badly for me.

 

No, please do. I've always considered myself an outlet for that. Say to me that which you can't to others, because our rules disallow.

 

But I'm right about home automation. Just like I'm right about the iPad mini. It's conditioning, and it's conditioning in the wrong direction. So when the time comes to actually make the jump to the third personal computing revolution, people will whine that their half-tabs (the ones that can only do a quarter of what proper tablet computers will) are what they "really wanted".

 

You don't haul gravel in a Mini Cooper. 

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #86 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

But I'm right about home automation.

 

Possibly. Don't get me wrong. I absolutely believe that new and greatly improved technologies will continue to make out lives better (even in our homes.) I'm just skeptical of this overall, broad and somewhat ambiguous "home automation" bit. I predict more point solutions some of which might talk to each other, but I'm skeptical of an overall network of devices that work together in some kind of gadget symphony.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Just like I'm right about the iPad mini.

 

Perhaps you can clarify what your claim about the iPad mini is/was. I seem to recall it being that there wouldn't be one and, if there was, it wouldn't sell. Also that there's no need for one. If these were not your claims, I apologize. If they were (in essence) your claims, you do appear to be wrong on all of them.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It's conditioning, and it's conditioning in the wrong direction.

 

What is?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So when the time comes to actually make the jump to the third personal computing revolution, people will whine that their half-tabs (the ones that can only do a quarter of what proper tablet computers will) are what they "really wanted".

 

Possibly. Or it will be a device that meets a different mix of needs and desires. You car example actually (ironically) plays to this point exactly.


Edited by MJ1970 - 1/5/13 at 7:22pm

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post #87 of 94

msft & W8 are DOA

post #88 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

Quite true. I agree. And I may well be wrong about "home automation." I accept that possibility. You'll note that I even accepted some of the suggestions offered by some posters as possibly legitimate use cases.



Except that in these examples you point to the real and tangible benefits of these innovations (be able to watch a TV program at a different time than broadcast...adjust the HVAC settings without manually doing them.) So your examples seem to be poor ones because the benefits are rather obvious. The broader and more vague "home automation" "solution" is much less clear.



I'm fully aware of this. I've never claimed differently and I hope you're not implying that I have. But the point here is exactly that...what are the new time and work saving conveniences in the home that are still be tackled? I'll go further...beyond just time and work saving stuff...we probably have most of that tackled (though, granted, government regulations on things like shower heads, toilets, washing machines and dishwashers is causing us to do MORE work)...it might even be pleasure and leisure enhancements? What are these that demand a broad "home automation" infrastructure?

I can see TVs that are better.

I can see music players that are smarter.

I can see thermostats that are smarter.

I can even see the vision that some (including Mr. Skil) have described. I just wonder how many people really want or need such things.



I hope you're not implying that I'm a Luddite. You'd be quite wrong. I get that some people don't understand the point of new technologies.



Possibly you're right. Possibly. Though evidence of your claim would be helpful here. Until then I'll assume it's just your best guess.

There are no benefits to watching a program at another time that is all that important. We survived quite well before. It's just convenience, nothing more. The same thing for almost every other automated technology. It's just a matter of whether that convenience is worthwhile to you. Is it worthwhile for your home to recognize you when you reach your front door so that it could unlock it for you so that you don't have to go fumbling around for keys on a cold winter night? We can unlock a car with a smartphone, is that much better? But it's getting pretty popular.

How about when your automatic garage door opener opens the door when your car gets in the driveway? That's done now as well. How about automatic sprinklers for your lawn? Lights going off and on when you're out of the house? Coffee being made at just the right time in the morning? All of this is being done now, and the products are pretty popular.

This, and more, instead of being done with many different systems, would be controlled by a central computer, in a smart home. I have neighbors whose driveway gates roll open when their car turns into the driveway. Pretty nice during a snowy day.

I think you're not giving this any real thought. People like convenience, and they're willing to pay for it. A lot of people would just love to be able to tell the house to turn the temperature up a couple of degrees, rather than have to get up, go to a different floor, and adjust the thermostat themselves.

There are quite a few things that could easily be done once a computer is controlling it. You don't have to think that people don't want it. You may not. But when you look at all the convenience factors in modern living, you must understand that it's what people do want. And the easier it is to do, the more people will want it. One reason the VCR died out was because the DVR was so much easier to use, even though you no longer could own the recordings. Convenience won out there too. It will always win out.
post #89 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It's logical. Microsoft is unable to innovate, so they have no choice but to buy companies. Apple, OTOH, is clearly able to innovate, so they don't NEED to buy companies for ideas.
Who do you think is going to win the bidding wars when both companies are involved?

Wait what, Apple was one of the companies who was bidding for this company and they buy other firms all the time.

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post #90 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Suozzi View Post

msft & W8 are DOA

I think they'll do just fine, they just signed a 618 million dollar contract with the DOD. Plus Win 8 on tablets make for a pretty good mobile office device, we will have to wait and see though. I hope the iPad gets MS Office to.

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post #91 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

I think they'll do just fine, they just signed a 618 million dollar contract with the DOD. Plus Win 8 on tablets make for a pretty good mobile office device, we will have to wait and see though. I hope the iPad gets MS Office to.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57562241-75/windows-laptop-sales-sink-but-thats-just-part-of-the-problem/

melior diabolus quem scies
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post #92 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


You might as well ask that of every technology that's made life easier. The VCR and DVR, for example. Do we really need to record shows when we aren't home? Are they that important? Not really, but hundreds of millions, if not billions do this. Do we need a thermostat? No, we can adjust the temperature by hand, manually. Do we want to? No. There are many time and work saving conveniences we all use, including you. There will always be some Luddites out there who don't understand the point to some new technologies. But there will be many more who want them. Products aren't made only if everyone wants it. There will be millions of people who do want this, even early on. Eventually, most homes will come with it. You may not understand the appeal, but I assure you, it is there.

Don't need most of that but I would love for my refrigerator to tell me what I have in it so while I'm shopping I know what to get.My husband and I love our Sonos which is now in every room of the house and it would be nice to have one display unit that can operate everything that was mentioned including lights and alarm system.. 

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post #93 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

There are no benefits to watching a program at another time that is all that important. We survived quite well before. It's just convenience, nothing more.

 

Of course there are. Don't be silly.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The same thing for almost every other automated technology. It's just a matter of whether that convenience is worthwhile to you.

 

I understand that.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Is it worthwhile for your home to recognize you when you reach your front door so that it could unlock it for you so that you don't have to go fumbling around for keys on a cold winter night?

 

I would think so, yes.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

How about when your automatic garage door opener opens the door when your car gets in the driveway? That's done now as well. How about automatic sprinklers for your lawn? Lights going off and on when you're out of the house? Coffee being made at just the right time in the morning? All of this is being done now, and the products are pretty popular.

 

I get that and I agree.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

This, and more, instead of being done with many different systems, would be controlled by a central computer, in a smart home.

 

Possibly. But I'm failing to see what additional benefit this complete, centralized, integrated computer system for the home brings. At least in relation to the additional complexity and cost.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I think you're not giving this any real thought.

 

Thanks for telling me what you think I'm thinking.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

People like convenience, and they're willing to pay for it.

 

I understand this and have never claimed differently. Of course they also weigh the benefits against the cost. It certainly isn't a "convenience and automation at any cost" kind of thing.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

A lot of people would just love to be able to tell the house to turn the temperature up a couple of degrees, rather than have to get up, go to a different floor, and adjust the thermostat themselves.

 

Possibly, yes.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

But when you look at all the convenience factors in modern living, you must understand that it's what people do want. And the easier it is to do, the more people will want it. One reason the VCR died out was because the DVR was so much easier to use, even though you no longer could own the recordings. Convenience won out there too. It will always win out.

 

I totally understand this and have never denied it. It seems you're arguing against a straw man here. You're arguing against something I have not claimed. My question is what additional benefit (given the costs and complexities) a whole, integrated, centralized home automation system brings over the variety of point solutions we already have (and which are improving.)

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post #94 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Don't need most of that but I would love for my refrigerator to tell me what I have in it so while I'm shopping I know what to get.

 

You've given me an idea.  I think I'll snap a quick reference photo of the inside of the refrigerator, before leaving for the grocery from now on.

 

I can't count the number of times I've passed by the milk aisle or something else, thinking "Oh I'm pretty sure we have enough at home".   Ha.  Nope.

 

Being able to look might mean we don't need RFID tags, etc.   Perhaps inside-the-fridge and pantry web cams would work just as well instead  1biggrin.gif

 

Damn.  Better patent this quick.

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