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US MacBook sales drop 6% over 2012 holidays, NPD says

post #1 of 90
Thread Starter 
In spite of discounts on Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and even Thanksgiving Day, Apple's MacBook line of computers saw a 6 percent decrease in U.S. sales over the five-week-long 2012 holiday sales period.

NPD Group?s Weekly Tracking Service revealed on Friday that Apple?s MacBook sales from Nov. 18 through Dec. 22 were lower than the same period in 2011. Despite slower sales, the average selling price of MacBooks was up nearly $100 from a year prior to $1,419.

MacBooks


The decline in domestic MacBook sales could be explained at least in part by the fact that the only new portable Mac released by Apple ahead of the holiday shopping season was the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display. The rest of Apple's MacBook lineup received updates over the summer, while the company's fall refresh focused on desktops, with a redesigned iMac and updated Mac mini.

In contrast, Apple issued minor updates to the entire MacBook Pro lineup in late 2011, featuring slightly faster Intel CPUs, new graphics processors, and larger hard drives.

While Apple saw a domestic decline with its notebook lineup, MacBooks did not see as significant of a decline as Windows PCs during the same period. Sales of notebooks running Microsoft Windows were down 11 percent year over year, even with the much hyped launch of the new Windows 8 operating system.

The average selling price of Windows notebooks increased $2 to $420. Touchscreen notebooks with Windows 8 had an average price of $700 and accounted for 4.5 percent of all Windows notebook sales.

The biggest hit for PCs came in the low-end market ? a segment where Apple?s iPad has had the greatest effect. Sales of sub-$500 PCs were off 16 percent year over year, according to NPD.

Windows 8


In all, American consumer electronics sales were off 3.7 percent in the 2012 holiday season when compared to 2011. Overall electronics sales worsened as the holiday season went on, as the last three weeks before Christmas saw sales fall 11 percent.

Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis at NPD, blamed what he called a ?weak product cycle? in the consumer electronics industry. Bright spots he cited were soundbars, headphones with microphones, interchangeable lens cameras, cellular accessories, and tablets.

NPD


"For the third consecutive year sales trends worsened in the later part of the holiday season,? Baker said. "The hyped-up promotion of Black Friday, Cyber Monday and now Thanksgiving Day has proven remarkably effective in moving sales into the early part of the holiday season. Trends like online shopping and self-gifting have intensified the focus on the more event-driven early part of the holiday season."

Market watchers have forecast that Apple will see an overall decline in Mac sales during the 2012 holiday quarter, given that the bulk of the company's sales are of notebooks, and the redesigned iMac saw limited availability before Christmas. The 2011 holiday shopping season was a record setting quarter for the Mac, as Apple sold a best-ever 5.2 million units.
post #2 of 90
A cheaper, lighter, longer-battery, arm-based notebook would destroy PC sales. Throw in LTE FTW
post #3 of 90
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post
A cheaper, lighter, longer-battery, arm-based notebook would destroy PC sales. Throw in LTE FTW

 

Why? A traditional laptop with no software, a gimped OS, no Thunderbolt, and based on a mobile architecture would do better than the regular MacBook line, all of which would be vastly more capable? I mean, we've seen how well Surface RT did.

 

And again, they tried cellular telephony in a laptop. They decided against it.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #4 of 90

The decline is due to the iPad. 

 

The "notebook" paradigm is over 30 years old.

 

You can also argue a little more reluctance in consumer spending, but not much else. 

 

Apple's quarterly report will tell the actual tale, where we'll see actual YoY numbers. 

post #5 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

A cheaper, lighter, longer-battery, arm-based notebook would destroy PC sales. Throw in LTE FTW

I believe it's called a "netbook". Perhaps you heard of it? It's the cheaper-than-dirt notebooks that were supposed to decimate the PC (and Apple) and has just recently been been declared dead.

Apparently even consumers realized just how bad those pieces of junk actually were.
post #6 of 90
Even a two year old can find an Elmo app on an iPad. A two year old toddler would pop all the keys on a laptop/netbook and put them in his mouth.
post #7 of 90
No DVD on the new model.........
post #8 of 90
Originally Posted by deepriver View Post
No DVD on the new model.........

 

Is this your actual answer? Do you honestly think for one second that this has anything to do with it? No.

It has been SIX MONTHS since the retina models were released. Notice also that they released another new model, based on the old design, that DOES have have an ODD. This has nothing to do with the sales.


Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post
A two year old toddler would pop all the keys on a laptop/netbook and put them in his mouth.
 

That's one impressive kid, being able to get laptop keys off! lol.gif

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #9 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...
The decline in domestic MacBook sales could be explained at least in part by the fact that the only new portable Mac released by Apple ahead of the holiday shopping season was the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display. The rest of Apple's MacBook lineup received updates over the summer, while the company's fall refresh focused on desktops, with a redesigned iMac and updated Mac mini.
In contrast, Apple issued minor updates to the entire MacBook Pro lineup in late 2011, featuring slightly faster Intel CPUs, new graphics processors, and larger hard drives. ...

 

Assuming NPD's numbers are correct, I think that explains it almost entirely.

 

Another, minor at this time, factor is that I think notebook sales are at, or close to, their peak. As tablets become ubiquitous, and more than capable to handle the mobile needs of the vast majority of users, I think a lot of sales are going to switch back to desktops. Notebooks as a primary computer have always been a compromise solution -- relatively heavy to carry around, and cramped by relatively tiny screens -- as well as overkill for what most people need to do away from home or the office. With the advent of useable tablets -- i.e., iPads -- more and more people are likely to opt for more of a no-compromise approach to computing, picking the devices that work the best for what they are used for and where they are used. Even a 21" iMac is better and more productive than a 15" MacBook for stationary use. An iPad or iPhone is much easier to carry around for mobile use, with all the functionality that most users need. Most people don't have to compromise any longer, and they aren't going to want to.

 

Notebooks have also been sort of a "fashion" trend for the last decade, with people buying them even when they don't need to carry them around. Now it's much cooler to be seen with an iPad than even a MacBook Air. So the "fashion" aspect of choices will also fuel this trend. For those who really do need a "full computer" on the go -- and that's really a relatively small number of people -- MacBook Airs with Retina displays will be the standard hardware in a couple of years as the MBP line will gradually be phased out in its favor.

 

It will be interesting to see what Apple does with its desktop line over the next several years as the expected uptick in desktop sales takes off. I'm skeptical that we'll ever see the xMac, but perhaps another 1 or 2 iMac options, or more variation in the Mini line.

post #10 of 90

I'm overdue for a new MacBook Pro, but I want a Retina model, and I'm putting off getting one until their external monitor is Retina.

 

I dropped a SSD into my 3.5 year old 17-inch MBP, and it feels like a new machine.

 

 

 
post #11 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

A cheaper, lighter, longer-battery, arm-based notebook would destroy PC sales. Throw in LTE FTW

Isn't that what those Chromebook things are supposed to be?

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The decline is due to the iPad. 

 

The "notebook" paradigm is over 30 years old.

 
It is due to the iPad.
The paradigm can be 75 years old, many things will never be easier by touch input. 
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post #12 of 90
No 17 inch (our company would have purchased 3 of them if they were sill available) and no optical drive (necessary for our video productions and file distribution to customers). Yep... that's pretty much 6%. But I guess Apple doesn't need us.
post #13 of 90

How does the NPD get word of how many MacBooks Apple has sold when Apple hasn't released any numbers?  How does that "happen"?

post #14 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The decline is due to the iPad. 

 

The "notebook" paradigm is over 30 years old.

 

You can also argue a little more reluctance in consumer spending, but not much else. 

 

Apple's quarterly report will tell the actual tale, where we'll see actual YoY numbers. 

I suspect the iPad is a big reason why a lot of consumers choose not to buy a laptop. With the advent of the iPad I suspect a lot of consumers question what they hell they have been buying a fully featured laptop for when all they do is browse and email. Now they also FaceTime, chat, play games and listen to music, etc on a much more user friendly device. In other words, a lot of people have smartened up. Is my guess. 

post #15 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The decline is due to the iPad. 

 

The "notebook" paradigm is over 30 years old.

 

You can also argue a little more reluctance in consumer spending, but not much else. 

 

Apple's quarterly report will tell the actual tale, where we'll see actual YoY numbers. 

 

I agree.  Notebooks are still essential for anyone who needs to get "serious" work done on the road, but there's another group who just wants portable access to information, picture sharing, online shopping, email, etc. For these people, an iPad more than satisfies.  I have a MacBook Pro and love it, but these days I travel with my iPad a lot more often than I do the MacBook.  If I don't need to work while I'm on the road, I prefer the convenience of the iPad.  My next Mac might very well be a desktop again.

post #16 of 90
Apple MUST introduce touch screens to ALL their laptops. As an avid iPad user, I am constantly swiping up and down the screen on my MacBook Air 13" after using my iPad. It is the most intuitive and speedy way to scroll up and down a web page or document, and pinch to zoom is the most intuitive manner in which to, well, zoom in or out or or scale an item. (Grafio on iOS uses pinch to zoom to scale objects - and once you have tried it, there is no going back to slower less precise methods.)
 
Consumers are going to get used to touch screens thanks to tablets/phones and want laptops that do the same, as are creative pros like myself. Those who claim touch screens are tiring are wrong, what IS tiring is performing gestures in the air, but that is not the same.
 
If the 2013 MacBook Airs don't do touch, their sales will fall as people migrate to increasingly powerful Android or Windows transportables, where apps will appear in parallel with the increased sales rendering Apple's current value proposition (superior apps) redundant.
 
(Sorry if this appears twice, I didn't login before and not sure if prior post was accepted.)
post #17 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Apple MUST introduce touch screens to ALL their laptops. As an avid iPad user, I am constantly swiping up and down the screen on my MacBook Air 13" after using my iPad. It is the most intuitive and speedy way to scroll up and down a web page or document, and pinch to zoom is the most intuitive manner in which to, well, zoom in or out or or scale an item. (Grafio on iOS uses pinch to zoom to scale objects - and once you have tried it, there is no going back to slower less precise methods.)
 
Consumers are going to get used to touch screens thanks to tablets/phones and want laptops that do the same, as are creative pros like myself. Those who claim touch screens are tiring are wrong, what IS tiring is performing gestures in the air, but that is not the same.
 
If the 2013 MacBook Airs don't do touch, their sales will fall as people migrate to increasingly powerful Android or Windows transportables, where apps will appear in parallel with the increased sales rendering Apple's current value proposition (superior apps) redundant.
 
(Sorry if this appears twice, I didn't login before and not sure if prior post was accepted.)

 

The decision of adding touch screens to ALL their laptops because of a few folks with Alzheimer's + can't discern a laptop from a tablet is just a recipe for disaster.

post #18 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Consumers are going to get used to touch screens thanks to tablets/phones and want laptops that do the same, as are creative pros like myself. Those who claim touch screens are tiring are wrong, what IS tiring is performing gestures in the air, but that is not the same.

It doesn't matter of your finger is touching air or a display, I'd your arms are outstretched in front of you for extended times you'll get gorilla arm.

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post #19 of 90

stock getting crushed again today on seemingly endless bad news.  so much for tax selling... where is the news on further cuts and drop in production??  should be front and center, no?

post #20 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

Apple MUST introduce touch screens to ALL their laptops. As an avid iPad user, I am constantly swiping up and down the screen on my MacBook Air 13" after using my iPad. It is the most intuitive and speedy way to scroll up and down a web page or document, and pinch to zoom is the most intuitive manner in which to, well, zoom in or out or or scale an item. (Grafio on iOS uses pinch to zoom to scale objects - and once you have tried it, there is no going back to slower less precise methods.)
 
Consumers are going to get used to touch screens thanks to tablets/phones and want laptops that do the same, as are creative pros like myself. Those who claim touch screens are tiring are wrong, what IS tiring is performing gestures in the air, but that is not the same.

 

Explain how software development (a large portion of the professional market) works on a touchscreen computer?  Lots of typing (many characters require holding the shift key), often need precise control over where the cursor is placed (a pain on a touchscreen because a fingertip is not accurate enough for fast cursor placement), use of hotkeys, often switching between many documents, etc.

 

Obviously a combination of physical keyboard and touchscreen is a possibility, but it's still slower to go back and forth from keyboard to touchscreen than to just use keyboard and mouse.

 

Any tasks which require large amounts of text input/editing don't benefit from a touchscreen.

 
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post #21 of 90
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post
Apple MUST introduce touch screens to ALL their laptops.

 

No. Period. Apple will kill laptops entirely, replacing them with the iPad (9.7", 11", 13.3", and a 15" once the weight can go down enough). They are NOT going to make laptops with touchscreens!


As an avid iPad user, I am constantly swiping up and down the screen on my MacBook Air 13" after using my iPad.

 

So am I. That's the idea! Wait, no, I'm not touching my screens. But I'm desiring to. And that's Apple's game. 

 

OS X is being made more "touchy", but it's not going to accept touches. It's not made for it, it never was, it never will be. As many times as I've wanted to touch a UI element in the newest OS X's, I've been glad that I am still forced to use a mouse. Because it's just not ready. 

 

Yet.

 

But when the transition comes, when laptops are killed off and the iMac is given a multitouch redesign, when Apple sells a 27" (and 40") Multitouch Display for their professional Mac and Mac Mini, we'll have been begging them for it. The people that hate OS X now? The ones that think it's becoming "too iPady"? Don't get it. Rather, they DO get it. They get exactly what Apple is doing, they just don't see why. 

 

Apple can't drop a Mac 128k on the world anymore. Too many people own computers now. We have to be weaned toward it, and that's what OS X is now. When the day comes, we'll ask why it took so long. But it needed to take that long.


Those who claim touch screens are tiring are wrong, what IS tiring is performing gestures in the air, but that is not the same.

 

It is when the touchscreen is vertical, which isn't what Apple would give us.

 

If the 2013 MacBook Airs don't do touch, their sales will fall…

 

No.

 

…as people migrate to increasingly powerful Android or Windows transportables…

 

*snort* You've seen Windows 8, right? lol.gif

 

…apps will appear in parallel with the increased sales rendering Apple's current value proposition (superior apps) redundant.

 

What?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #22 of 90

I think behind all the hype, Apple has disappointed with the retina Macbook Pros.  The 13" model is the worst of the set.   The Macbook Pro Retina with 13" screen, 128GB SSD, and 8GB RAM has a value NO WHERE EVEN CLOSE to $1699 + Tax.  They even have a 13" retina MBP configuration at $2700 + Tax.   It is downright laughable.     The icing on the cake is that they are using proprietary SSD blades, soldering the RAM to the $1200 logic board and virtually making the thing non-upgradeable and non-user serviceable.    So you spend $1800-$2900 on a 13" laptop that has an shorter than normal lifespan due to technology advances and the fact that you can't upgrade normal basic components.

 

No need to bring out the haters.    I own 2 iMacs, 2 MBPs, 3 iPads, 3 iPods, 3iPhones in my family.  I love Apple Products which is why I spend more to buy them than I would have to if I bought PC, but if Apple thinks this year they are going to slim down to Macbook Airs and Macbook Pro Retinas, neither are serviceable by a user, I will be done with Apple Laptops and will need to find another.   Nice to offer the Retinas to those that have the money to blow on them, but if you want a common user group, you will need to maintain some type of reasonable line of laptops.

 

IMHO :-)

post #23 of 90

Well, can't blame me for the decline.  I bought a 13" MBP of the holidays.

Granted I bought an iPad Mini (pre-order at launch) but I don't think that quite cancels each other out 1tongue.gif

post #24 of 90
OK. Let's get this straight:

Sales of Apple laptops are down 6%in spite of lack of new products. Sales of WIndows laptops are down 11% even with the much-hyped WIndows 8 launch.

ASP for Apple laptops is up $100. ASP for Windows laptops is up $2 (considerably less than inflation).

And somehow, this is bad news for Apple, but it's great news for Microsoft (at least, not as bad news for Microsoft - or you'd think so considering the way the market is reacting)?
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #25 of 90
ARM processors for laptops, unless they are dealing in arrays of them won't touch a present generation Intel or AMD CPU, not by a long shot. Neither will the ImgTec GPGPUs.
post #26 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post

I think behind all the hype, Apple has disappointed with the retina Macbook Pros.  The 13" model is the worst of the set.   The Macbook Pro Retina with 13" screen, 128GB SSD, and 8GB RAM has a value NO WHERE EVEN CLOSE to $1699 + Tax.  They even have a 13" retina MBP configuration at $2700 + Tax.   It is downright laughable.     The icing on the cake is that they are using proprietary SSD blades, soldering the RAM to the $1200 logic board and virtually making the thing non-upgradeable and non-user serviceable.    So you spend $1800-$2900 on a 13" laptop that has an shorter than normal lifespan due to technology advances and the fact that you can't upgrade normal basic components.

No need to bring out the haters.    I own 2 iMacs, 2 MBPs, 3 iPads, 3 iPods, 3iPhones in my family.  I love Apple Products which is why I spend more to buy them than I would have to if I bought PC, but if Apple thinks this year they are going to slim down to Macbook Airs and Macbook Pro Retinas, neither are serviceable by a user, I will be done with Apple Laptops and will need to find another.   Nice to offer the Retinas to those that have the money to blow on them, but if you want a common user group, you will need to maintain some type of reasonable line of laptops.

IMHO :-)

Then don't buy one and quityerbitchin.

In spite of all your complaints, Apple was down 6% - or half the decline that Windows laptops had. Apple's average selling price is up 50 times the amount of Windows laptops.

Obvously, someone doesn't agree with you. In particular, the market apparently doesn't care about expandability - so few people expand their laptops that it's just not an issue.
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post #27 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No. Period. Apple will kill laptops entirely, replacing them with the iPad (9.7", 11", 13.3", and a 15" once the weight can go down enough). They are NOT going to make laptops with touchscreens!

Most would agree that laptops with touchscreens is not really necessary, especially due to the iPad product line.

However, it does beg the question (and I'm serious about this question for which I do not have the answer, but believe it often impacts computer purchases)... how important is MS Office for computer shoppers?...because iOS doesn't do MS Office.  Or is MS Office a non-issue?

post #28 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Why? A traditional laptop with no software, a gimped OS, no Thunderbolt, and based on a mobile architecture would do better than the regular MacBook line, all of which would be vastly more capable? I mean, we've seen how well Surface RT did.

And again, they tried cellular telephony in a laptop. They decided against it.
ARM chips are improving in performance faster than intel is improving power management. Recompiling an app that runs on intel to run on arm is trivial
post #29 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macboy Pro View Post

I think behind all the hype, Apple has disappointed with the retina Macbook Pros.  The 13" model is the worst of the set.   The Macbook Pro Retina with 13" screen, 128GB SSD, and 8GB RAM has a value NO WHERE EVEN CLOSE to $1699 + Tax.  They even have a 13" retina MBP configuration at $2700 + Tax.   It is downright laughable.     The icing on the cake is that they are using proprietary SSD blades, soldering the RAM to the $1200 logic board and virtually making the thing non-upgradeable and non-user serviceable.    So you spend $1800-$2900 on a 13" laptop that has an shorter than normal lifespan due to technology advances and the fact that you can't upgrade normal basic components.

I agree with you, as you'll see in my last comment, I chose the same model as the 13" retina, minus the drawbacks.  The Standard MBP is a great machine and an even better value not that they offer the 2012 (fully upgraded, saved for HDD) as a refurbished...which is what I got.  I got the 2.9 Ghtz i7, 750 GB HDD (user-upgradable to SSD, or even drop the DVD for a combo "Fusion Drive Setup), 8 GB RAM (user-upgradable to 16 GB), all for $1,269 + tax!

 

It doesn't bother me one bit that it's not retina, nor is it a pound lighter.  I debated long and hard between that and the refurb 13" 2012 MBA, but for $600 less, I got a much more capable and upgradable machine.

 

The Retina MBP is nice, it may be the latest in tech, but for most (non-gamers and non-pro-sumers), the Air and the Standar Pro is more than you'll ever need...

 

Edit/Add: I also don't see the standard MBPs going away this year either.  They might even do what a lot of people like me are doing, Dropping the DVD drive in favor of a SDD/Fusion Dirve setup.  They kind of did something like this in the Mac Mini, but why they didn't place a fusion drive in the updated 2012 model is kind of a missed opportunity IMO.


Edited by antkm1 - 1/4/13 at 11:09am
post #30 of 90
Originally Posted by drewys808 View Post
However, it does beg the question (and I'm serious about this question for which I do not have the answer, but believe it often impacts computer purchases)... how important is MS Office for computer shoppers?...because iOS doesn't do MS Office.  Or is MS Office a non-issue?

 

I'd say roughly zero percent. The iPad isn't suffering for lack thereof; it has iWork. The Surface isn't succeeding (by anyone's definition!) because it has Office; it's just terrible.

 

And if you're talking all iOS devices, that's even more readily apparent. All Windows Phone 7 and Windows Phone (is it still phone when phone, or is it just "Windows") 8 devices never took off, despite having access to Office. 

 

I mean, iWork exports to DOC. Even in environments where Office still has a greater presence than iWork, that exporting is apparently all that is needed.

 

One of my biggest dreams right now is that the DOC format is dead in the first world by January 1, 2020. By extension, all of Microsoft Office. That'll require a push by Apple on two fronts: first into business as a whole and second to make iOS iWork and OS X (XI) iWork have absolute feature parity. They'll need to be identical applications, simply with different UI and UX.


Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post
ARM chips are improving in performance faster than intel is improving power management.
 

Sure, and I see that. Intel sees that. I know a guy there in chip design; he said ARM's their biggest worry. 


Thing is, X86 still affords far more than ARM on every front, and it will for quite some time. Most of them visible to all, but some of the most important aren't readily apparent. I forget, uh, what was it, "ARM's just not ready to be a professional chip" or something… 

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #31 of 90
I don't understand why these groups can keep such good track of Apple computer sales, but they can't ever find out about Kindle Fire sales. Wouldn't Amazon investors want to know how well or how poorly Amazon's tablet sales are doing? These groups are always so quick to jump on how poorly Apple product sales are doing. I'm sure many of not most companies will have lower sales than last year due to the poor economy, not just Apple.
post #32 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I believe it's called a "netbook". Perhaps you heard of it? It's the cheaper-than-dirt notebooks that were supposed to decimate the PC (and Apple) and has just recently been been declared dead.
Apparently even consumers realized just how bad those pieces of junk actually were.
I never suggested any thing like a netbook, I am only saying that intel never really figured how to optimize their chips for power management.
post #33 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepriver View Post

No DVD on the new model.........

Funny, I burn DVDs with my MacBook Air all the time. Guess some people are easily stumped by simple problems.

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post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

One of my biggest dreams right now is that the DOC format is dead in the first world by January 1, 2020. By extension, all of Microsoft Office. That'll require a push by Apple on two fronts: first into business as a whole and second to make iOS iWork and OS X (XI) iWork have absolute feature parity. They'll need to be identical applications, simply with different UI and UX.

That might happen, but I doubt it.  Unless Apple can make their current iWork Suite of Apps just as capable as Office Apps, it will still be around for another 7 years or more.

 

The current complaint i hear A LOT is that iWork is just not as capable as Office.  Sure Pages reads and writes to .doc format (i might also mention the current standard, post-Office 2010 is .docx) but iWork Apps often have issues in the translations and compatibilities.  I'm going to give iWork a chance to be my home/personal use Apps, but the world of business would never (right now or in the near future) rely 100% on it.  Office is a much better Suite of programs than most Mac Users realize. Sure it's highly complex suite of Apps, but they need to be for business to function.

post #35 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

I don't understand why these groups can keep such good track of Apple computer sales, but they can't ever find out about Kindle Fire sales. Wouldn't Amazon investors want to know how well or how poorly Amazon's tablet sales are doing? These groups are always so quick to jump on how poorly Apple product sales are doing. I'm sure many of not most companies will have lower sales than last year due to the poor economy, not just Apple.

It's how Amazon keeps its stock price up there.

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post #36 of 90

Arrrgh. 

Apple portables down 6% (in article title.)

Windows down 11%. (buried in article.)

 

How about a more accurate "iPads eating PC market for everyone"?

 

Apple still comes out on top. 

post #37 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

A cheaper, lighter, longer-battery, arm-based notebook would destroy PC sales. Throw in LTE FTW

Would be an interesting product. Not sure how much lighter you can get than a MBA, but maybe longer battery life even though its already quite long.

post #38 of 90
Overall retail sales in the US disappointed this holiday season. If this report is accurate, Apple actually outperformed considering that they dropped only 6% vs. 11% for Windows PC manufacturers, and managed a larger increase in average selling price. My guess is that the 13" rMBP is a bit pricey for a Christmas gift for most (the one I bought on 12/26/12 apparently was 4 days too late for NPD).
post #39 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oflife View Post

...as are creative pros like myself. Those who claim touch screens are tiring are wrong, what IS tiring is performing gestures in the air, but that is not the same.
 

I'm sure you're a 'creative type' (however self-proclaimed.)

But I'm a 'creative type' too. Want to know how much my creative output has gone up now that I have an intuitive way to do music, recording and even painting since I got my iPad?

To me, using a mouse designed for selecting text to do anything truly 'creative' is ridiculous.

 

The balance in advantage between tablet and old keyboard-based computing is just about at the tipping point.

post #40 of 90

On the whole, I agree, and wasn't praising Windows 8, as a UX designer myself, it is a disaster, but then so has every build of Windows and yet it owns 95% of the market as of Friday January 4 2013.

 

Further, I was not advocating a switch away from keyboards and mice - choice is better. My best ever phone was the Sony Ericsson P9XX series, because you could choose between:

 

1. Stylus

2. Touch

3. On screen keyboard

4. Mechanical keyboard

 

And the OS (Symbian) was far more intelligent than anything today. For example, to create an entry on the calendar, you just hold down over the appropriate day - little touches like that are priceless.

 

As I think most are hinting at, Apple need to release transportables, IE, a MacBook Air formfactor with a display that snaps off (using magnets perhaps?) and can be positioned either upside down on top of the keyboard, or even function on it's own with the battery in the display - NOT the keyboard.

 

Me thinks Apple will do this. If not, there are other contenders waiting in the wings...

 

;)

 

See what Fujitsu, HP and Toshiba have done in this space over the last 15 years, some hardware quite innovative, just let down by rubbish software.

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