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Apple's 9.7-inch iPad to get boost from increased enterprise tablet adoption in 2013

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
While many recent reports have focused on Apple's new iPad mini, one market analyst says an uptick in expected enterprise tablet purchases will allow the full-size iPad to continue its domination of the market.

2013 CIO Survey
Source: Piper Jaffray


In a note to investors on Monday, Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster said a recent survey of 59 chief information officers over 12 different industries points to continued growth for Apple's 9.7-inch iPad, which is reportedly better suited for business operations than the iPad mini.

The investment firm's annual CIO survey suggests that 57 percent of organizations plan to deploy tablets to workers in 2013, compared to 46 percent in 2012. Of the CIOs who said their companies would participate in device rollouts, 15 percent have plans for "broad deployments," almost four times as many as last year's 4 percent. This compares to the 34 percent of respondents who expect to increase investments in PCs.

"We view the greater deployment of tablets as a positive for AAPL given that we believe the iPad has over 60% global tablet share and likely a higher share among enterprises," Munster wrote. "We believe continued growth in enterprise tablet deployment will help drive continued growth in the full sized iPad segment given the larger iPads are better for content creation."

The analyst went on to say that "broad" enterprise deployments are expected to increase rapidly in the next 3-5 years.

Also of note is a decrease in the number of companies that do not have any deployment plans, which fell from 54 percent in 2012 to 42 percent in 2013. Only 5 percent of respondents expected to decrease spending in tablets for the coming year while 20 percent plan to make funding cuts for PCs.

Spending Areas


In addition to the increased tablet adoption, the survey found storage and security remain the top two least discretionary items for the year with 64 percent and 63 percent of respondents saying they expect to increase spending in those areas, respectively. Overall, 76 percent of the CIOs polled said they planned to increase spending in 2013, slightly down from 90 percent in 2012.

Piper Jaffray reiterates an overweight rating for AAPL stock, with a target price of $900.
post #2 of 39

Sorry to add MicroSoft to this, but for them to compete they will need to sell office for the ipad. MicroSoft said they will offer office for the pad, but knowing them it will be a watered down version and always "to be delivered later this year". lol

post #3 of 39
I said this when the iPad first came out. I could see this being a superb sales tool. For example, when you're at a trade show, you could have all your literature and promotional videos on the iPad and easily show information to prospective customers. Laptops are far clumsier for this purpose.

Data gathering is, of course, another very useful application.

And then, of course, you have the "all your technical data and repair manuals in one place" application - like the airlines are starting to do to eliminate 40 pounds of paper manuals per flight.
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post #4 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's 9.7-inch iPad, which is reportedly better suited for business operations than the iPad mini.

Didn't a lot of people here say the Mini would be better for a lot of businesses because of its portability?

Funny that businesses still gravitate to the full size original.
post #5 of 39
Interestingly, this doesn't take into account how users feel about iPad Mini. Since the iPad Mini is more or less equivalent to the larger iPad, I feel that a lot of companies would choose the mini %u2013 sacrificing the larger screen to be able to cut costs. Still, Apple wins.
post #6 of 39
IMO I believe lots of people look at the iPad mini for play and casual use. Even the few people I know have bought the mini for their kids and wives to play around with. It seems that business people and power users (including myself) will always prefer the larger iPad especially with the upcoming future upgrades and designs.
post #7 of 39
An so this is why Apple's stock was down $15 on Friday and is set to open down again this morning. 1biggrin.gif
post #8 of 39

Of course as soon as the bean counters in the corporation realize that the Mini is less expensive, the 9.7" will be history....

 

I used my original 9.7" iPad Daily since it was releases.  However, I find that my new iPad Mini is just as good at business related tasks as the larger iPads.  I do NOT miss the larger iPad in my work or play....

post #9 of 39
I suspect that in enterprise, in addition to the display size advantage, the Retina-quality display of the 9.7 iPad has a tremendous advantage over the display of the iPad mini.
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post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Didn't a lot of people here say the Mini would be better for a lot of businesses because of its portability?
Funny that businesses still gravitate to the full size original.

I don't know who said that. I would never have expected the Mini to be preferred in business.

The Mini is bought by people who want extra portability and/or lower cost. Cost is less of an issue with business. If I'm attending a trade show and want to present information to customers, the larger (and better) screen of the 9.7 more than makes up for the greater cost - especially since the trade show probably already cost $10 K or more. And extra portability is a minor issue. The people who are likely to use this are probably used to carrying a laptop and/or other devices and the few ounce difference is insignificant. The larger size more than makes up for the extra weight.

I'd expect the Mini to be used by people as the family's second iPad or as an entry level iPad. Not primarily as a business tool.
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post #11 of 39

Size?  It's not size.

 

The key things for the iPad in _ENTERPRISE_ business has been 

1) the difficulty in jailbreaking them and their implicit encrypted and sandboxed data and memory management systems.

2) the ability to do enterprise software distributions

3) the existence of enterprise management software (Enterprise IT can audit the things and quickly isolate those 

4) Apple licensing ActiveSync for Exchange

 

The last 2, replace RIMMs BES, which pretty much locked Blackberries into the enterprise for the last 10 years.  The iPad has very little barrier of entry in the field, and I think with the Surface/Win8 device effectively not a Win7 experience, I see Enterprise IT having no better answer than to adopt iPad support for business use.

post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post


Didn't a lot of people here say the Mini would be better for a lot of businesses because of its portability?
Funny that businesses still gravitate to the full size original.

 

Give it time.

 

It's probably taken two years to convince the head duck to allow iPads. Once he/she learns that there is a cheaper version (as someone else noted) then we'll see how the larger iPad fares... but that might take another 2 years.

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post #13 of 39

For one of my companies (I work for multiple), we are adopting tablets this year. The original plan called for iPads with RP. But that was before the launch of Mini and even before the Nexus 7. We have been testing both and found them to meet our needs better than the iPad because of portability. What's funny is that the weight and size of the iPad were not considered a big deal until we had the smaller devices in hand. Suddenly, everyone found the iPad awkward to take from room to room. Users tend to travel between 3 or 4 rooms, checking in/out inventory and running instruments/machinery. We want them to track their activities as well as use of inventory. So, mobility and portability are important.

 

The choice between Mini and Nexus 7 is not easy. We have engineers in both camps (more for iOS). So what we will likely end up doing is to deploy HTML5 web apps rather than dedicated iOS or Android apps. This has the additional advantage that not all employees will need a tablet. Some of them already have iPhones or Android phones, and can use either to access our HTML5 apps.

 

Upshot - iPad (2,, 3 or 4) is no longer under consideration.

post #14 of 39
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post
Funny that businesses still gravitate to the full size original.

 

Common sense is funny now?


Originally Posted by island hermit View Post
It's probably taken two years to convince the head duck to allow iPads. Once he/she learns that there is a cheaper version (as someone else noted) then we'll see how the larger iPad fares... but that might take another 2 years.

 

Or five seconds, since they're both visible on the website when the IT department goes to make the company order.

post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

For one of my companies (I work for multiple), we are adopting tablets this year. The original plan called for iPads with RP. But that was before the launch of Mini and even before the Nexus 7. We have been testing both and found them to meet our needs better than the iPad because of portability. What's funny is that the weight and size of the iPad were not considered a big deal until we had the smaller devices in hand. Suddenly, everyone found the iPad awkward to take from room to room. Users tend to travel between 3 or 4 rooms, checking in/out inventory and running instruments/machinery. We want them to track their activities as well as use of inventory. So, mobility and portability are important.

 

The choice between Mini and Nexus 7 is not easy. We have engineers in both camps (more for iOS). So what we will likely end up doing is to deploy HTML5 web apps rather than dedicated iOS or Android apps. This has the additional advantage that not all employees will need a tablet. Some of them already have iPhones or Android phones, and can use either to access our HTML5 apps.

 

Upshot - iPad (2,, 3 or 4) is no longer under consideration.

 

It sound like we do some of the same things with a Tablet.  We are using ACP Thin Manager clients to display HMI screens for machinery on the iPads.  The light weight and size of the Mini makes it a better tablet in my opinion for just about everything.  If I can see it fine with my 48 year old eyes it should work for most people...

 

We also have 20 outside sale people.  We are evaluating differnet CRM packages.  The Mini is so much more portable, I think it will become the standard in sales....

post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carthusia View Post

I suspect that in enterprise, in addition to the display size advantage, the Retina-quality display of the 9.7 iPad has a tremendous advantage over the display of the iPad mini.

 

I suspect that enterprise doesn't give a crap about Retina. It does nothing to increase the utility of the device. To see how much corporations care about pretty pictures, take a look at the monitors they dish out with user workstations.

 

Besides, even the non-retina screens look so much better than the average desktop display that I doubt anyone would complain.

post #17 of 39
Yep, I for one said that and I suspect that, that will be the case into the future. Remember there is always a lag when it comes to corporations adopting new technology and the Mini hasn't been out that long. Given that, at places where bring your own is practiced I've already seen some influx of iPad Minis. The almost universal reason is that the device is smaller.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Didn't a lot of people here say the Mini would be better for a lot of businesses because of its portability?
Funny that businesses still gravitate to the full size original.

It isn't funny it is the way businesses work. You won't see huge corporations buying new hardware on day one of its debut for mass distribution to its employees. It has taken the iPad a relatively long time to achieve its level of adoption relative to the consummer models and even so adoption was comparatively fast for the corporate world. You have to realize that iPad 1 was basically worthless for many corporate uses as it was extremely limited due to memory constraints and a number of software issues. These issues are basically gone in iPad 3 & 4.

I still see iPad 1 as Apples proof of concept machine. It validated the UI with the public on a performance constrained machine. IPad 3 really made the transition to a corporate worthy machine. The extra RAM makes a huge difference in functionality and is far more important to the corporate world than the retina display. IPad Mini might not be a proof of concept machine like iPad 1, but it will take awhile for the corporate world to digest its features. Thus, at best, reports like this one are at best uninformed and demonstrate a lack of understanding of the corporate IT world.
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sranger View Post

 

If I can see it fine with my 48 year old eyes it should work for most people...

 

 

The lower resolution of the Mini (compared to iPad 3/4 and Nexus 7) is only an issue in cases where iPhone apps are scaled up directly. Otherwise, it is not much of an issue.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sranger View Post

 

It sound like we do some of the same things with a Tablet.  We are using ACP Thin Manager clients to display HMI screens for machinery on the iPads.  The light weight and size of the Mini makes it a better tablet in my opinion for just about everything. 

 

I mostly agree because portability trumps the larger screen. Contrary to some the opinions expounded here, the Mini is quite well suited for enterprise/business apps precisely because portability is a bigger issue than most realize. As mentioned before, we didn't think the iPad was large or heavy until we held the Mini and Nexus7.

post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I don't know who said that. I would never have expected the Mini to be preferred in business.
I'm one of those that said that and frankly I still believe it will become true.
Quote:
The Mini is bought by people who want extra portability and/or lower cost.
Part of the problem here is that people often have a narrow definition of what business use is. If you are a sales rep I can see the original iPad being in your hand for years to come, but that is a small portion of a businesses portability needs. For many users extra portability is a huge factor especially if you are on your feet constantly.
Quote:
Cost is less of an issue with business.
That is totally a 180 out of alignment with reality, given an organization made up of more than a few people cost is always an issue.
Quote:
If I'm attending a trade show and want to present information to customers, the larger (and better) screen of the 9.7 more than makes up for the greater cost - especially since the trade show probably already cost $10 K or more. And extra portability is a minor issue.
True but again your view of the corporate world is extremely narrow. For one thing many businesses have a large number of employees that never come in contact with customers.
Quote:
The people who are likely to use this are probably used to carrying a laptop and/or other devices and the few ounce difference is insignificant. The larger size more than makes up for the extra weight.
I'd expect the Mini to be used by people as the family's second iPad or as an entry level iPad. Not primarily as a business tool.

I think you will find your expectations are wrong. You really need to look at the large array of people that are employed by today's businesses where the size of a tablet is everything. Effectively the tablet becomes a tool not a marketing device. As such tools are usually scaled for usability. Another way to look at this what the corporate world looked like before the advent of electronics. Back in the day aids like Daytimers and other organizational devices where very common and where effectively Mini notebooks. IPhone has effectively replaced these organizers in many cases but there is still a group that would benefit from a slightly larger device that doesn't become an anchor throughout the day.
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I'm one of those that said that and frankly I still believe it will become true.
Part of the problem here is that people often have a narrow definition of what business use is. If you are a sales rep I can see the original iPad being in your hand for years to come, but that is a small portion of a businesses portability needs. For many users extra portability is a huge factor especially if you are on your feet constantly.
That is totally a 180 out of alignment with reality, given an organization made up of more than a few people cost is always an issue.
True but again your view of the corporate world is extremely narrow. For one thing many businesses have a large number of employees that never come in contact with customers.
I think you will find your expectations are wrong. You really need to look at the large array of people that are employed by today's businesses where the size of a tablet is everything. Effectively the tablet becomes a tool not a marketing device. As such tools are usually scaled for usability. Another way to look at this what the corporate world looked like before the advent of electronics. Back in the day aids like Daytimers and other organizational devices where very common and where effectively Mini notebooks. IPhone has effectively replaced these organizers in many cases but there is still a group that would benefit from a slightly larger device that doesn't become an anchor throughout the day.

I'm talking about today's business. Companies are not likely to start equipping production people or non-customer contact people with iPads any time soon. Who's getting iPads in business today?
- Executives for whom it's a status symbol
- Sales people where the larger iPad is clearly advantageous
- Service people who will store all their technical details on the iPad - and for whom the larger screen is clearly advantageous.

The $70 to go from an iPad Mini to an iPad 2 (or even the $170 to go from the Mini to the iPad 4) is insignificant for those applications. And I say that based on my experience of running multimillion dollar companies.

Some day, tablets might be ubiquitous enough in business that every employee has one - in which case the Mini might find some target audience. But for now, the groups above aren't going to use it.
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post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Give it time.
Yep, the whole premise of the article is asinine as things take time in the business world. The Mini is only a couple of months old now and revision one thus no valid projection can be made.
Quote:
It's probably taken two years to convince the head duck to allow iPads. Once he/she learns that there is a cheaper version (as someone else noted) then we'll see how the larger iPad fares... but that might take another 2 years.

It isn't the convincing it is in the demonstrating of valid use cases and the devices suitability for those cases. For example the original iPad was useless for many corporate uses due to its inability to handle large PDFs. It even had issues with many web sites. However that doesn't mean that the device wasn't being investigated for many uses in business. It just takes a long time and by the time iPad 3 came out the hardware and software had matured to the point that many points of resistance had faded away.

IPad Mini doesn't suffer from many of those growing pains as the software has already matured and the hardware isn't bad. I can see the adoption curve being quicker for this device. Still you have the reality of budgeting and roll outs in the corporate world so that uptick will take awhile.
post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I'm talking about today's business. Companies are not likely to start equipping production people or non-customer contact people with iPads any time soon. Who's getting iPads in business today?
- Executives for whom it's a status symbol
- Sales people where the larger iPad is clearly advantageous
- Service people who will store all their technical details on the iPad - and for whom the larger screen is clearly advantageous.

 

I'm with ya, except for the Service People part, where I think the Mini makes more sense.

 

I've spent the past 15 or so years doing mobile field apps, and we've found over and over again, that people prefer pocketable devices.   No one likes lugging a laptop or even a large tablet around.   Everyone loves a device that fits in a pocket or holster.

 

I can't count the number of times that we found field personnel leaving their larger devices behind in their truck all day.   The most popular versions we made were for phones... even though the input screens were of course much smaller views at a time.

 

Something in between phone and tablet (yes, phablets) are probably the best overall choice.

 

However, often the device choice is made by someone behind a desk, who almost always goes for the big screen.   Sigh.

post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I'm talking about today's business. Companies are not likely to start equipping production people or non-customer contact people with iPads any time soon. Who's getting iPads in business today?
- Executives for whom it's a status symbol
I'm not too sure that most executives would see such a device as a status symbol. In many cases iPads are seen as tools to be carried around by mid level managers, supervisors and technicians. Any status that could be inferred from using an iPad quickly died with iPads extremely rapid run up in sales.
Quote:
- Sales people where the larger iPad is clearly advantageous
In the case of sales you are absolutely right, the large iPad is a huge advantage.
Quote:
- Service people who will store all their technical details on the iPad - and for whom the larger screen is clearly advantageous.
This is highly debatable. For many of these people physical size becomes a problem, especially if iPad is one of maybe a half dozen devices that you need to carry around.
Quote:
The $70 to go from an iPad Mini to an iPad 2 (or even the $170 to go from the Mini to the iPad 4) is insignificant for those applications. And I say that based on my experience of running multimillion dollar companies.
Not all companies are run the same way. I've seen companies that argue over the cost of a (single) drill bit for one project. We are talking the difference between $2.99 and $3.99. No maybe that is the result of ignorance but I see the same mentality applied to IT. For example corporate IT purchasing Windows PCs with barely enough RAM to run the operating system and then expecting the departments to upgrade their machines to usable state. This all in an effort to make budgets or projects look good.
Quote:
Some day, tablets might be ubiquitous enough in business that every employee has one - in which case the Mini might find some target audience. But for now, the groups above aren't going to use it.

You are assuming the groups you have identified above represent the common. I don't see this as the case at all. Now there is the obvious issue of software, if the app doesn't exist for a specific need, iPads won't be implemented. However adoption is far wider than you might first think.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Or five seconds, since they're both visible on the website when the IT department goes to make the company order.

 

I've never seen the IT department sign the checks and I've never seen an executive team move fast on anything other than pay increases.

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post #25 of 39
lol island hermit
+1
post #26 of 39
Gene Munster.......mr Apple, once again coming out with facts which are worthless. While I believe he might have asked CEO s of small companies these are not LARGE companies with thousands of people. Stands to reason that the CEO of Boeing, IBM, or JPMorgan would not even see Munster. If zmunster had any credibility he would state how mAny people work for these companies
Take anything Munster says with a grain of salt Rumor had it that SEC is investigating him for 'market manipulation'
post #27 of 39
what is the secret as to why Apple owns the iPod and iPad market that they revolutionized, but has so much competition in the iPhone market they also revolutionized?
post #28 of 39
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
what is the secret as to why Apple owns the iPod and iPad market that they revolutionized, but has so much competition in the iPhone market they also revolutionized?

 

Samsung wasn't stupid enough to pirate ideas back then, but they are now? 

 

Decades-old phone companies resent an industry startup being smarter, better, and more desired than any of their idiotic ideas?

I dunno.

post #29 of 39
IPads could be most wanted on medical field IF they have IR port to scan labels. There are cases iPad with IR port on em but they are costly and also new lightning connector was big screw up for this market. As far mini vs maxi, my wife (ARNP) says most of their staff switched to mini due to size that fits lab coat's pocket. We have one of those and I found it adorable. Overall I believe that devices with 7" will be more popular due to price/mobility reason.
post #30 of 39
Tallest, it's funny how you always switch subject on Samsung. So much hate. Who's maker of your home TV? Sony? 1smile.gif))
post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

IPads could be most wanted on medical field IF they have IR port to scan labels. There are cases iPad with IR port on em but they are costly and also new lightning connector was big screw up for this market. As far mini vs maxi, my wife (ARNP) says most of their staff switched to mini due to size that fits lab coat's pocket. We have one of those and I found it adorable. Overall I believe that devices with 7" will be more popular due to price/mobility reason.

 

7"? Pfft ...

 

We are talking 7.85".

post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

You are assuming the groups you have identified above represent the common. .

I'm not assuming any such thing.

I'm saying that the groups I cited represent the people who are buying iPads for business. And, based on everything I've seen, I'm confident that my statement is correct.

iPads in business are mostly purchased by executives, sales people, or service people. Who do you think buys them? Receptionists and janitors?
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post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

7"? Pfft ...

We are talking 7.85".

Dude, please turn on imagination. I was referring to 7" and 10" markets.
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post


Dude, please turn on imagination. I was referring to 7" and 10" markets.


Dude, please turn on your sense of humor. Who really cares about 0.85"?

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


Dude, please turn on your sense of humor. Who really cares about 0.85"?

 

My Wife.

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post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

 

My Wife.


Really? If my wife catches me cashing her in for cheap laughs ...

 

But then, I was talking with Audrey, wasn't I?

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


Dude, please turn on your sense of humor. Who really cares about 0.85"?

Lol, indeed.
post #38 of 39

I don't see the appeal of using a iPad for corporate usage. Don't get wrong I really enjoy my iPad but for end user purposes, the music creation apps, games, reading literature and so on are all quite top notch. In a corporate environment though the iPad falls pretty flat. One example is the lack of a file-manager. Sorry but this is a big one in most company’s especially mine. Although I have been out of the office due to my struggle with breast cancer I still work from home and one of my responsibilities is the approval of new technologies for our employees usage. Take for example a top tier Android tablet like the Samsung Galaxy Tab Note and Nexus 10/7, there is a program available called FX File-manager that can log into our SAMBA, Exchange and Cloud servers simultaneously. All from one program, you can also assign programs to a per file instance instead grouping all file extension to one program. Sand-Boxing is/might be a good thing but it defiantly hinders programs from talking to each other, for instance many of the office clone programs can access FX directly to retrieve your documents. Not to mention syncing of your network home directory to your tablet is a big, big convenience.

 

There is also a new multi-user function available in Android 4.2.1, yes I'm fully aware that this version is only available for the Nexus 10 and 7 but the ability to separate your business world from your home life is a big advantage. Let's even forget Android as this is a sore subject around here, the new Windows 8 tablets like the Lenovo ThinkPad II or Asus 810c with it's 18 hour battery life are a much better fit in a corporate environment. Even the price,The iPad with 64GB costs 700 dollars where as the Lenovo costs 650, you also get an SD Card slot which I know a lot of you are so adamant that it is not needed but is still used extensively with large multimedia projects plus a built in HDMI. You also get the advantage of having a full version of Office at your disposal not to mention any other Windows programs that are used on a daily basis.

 

We are a trading company and most of our in house programs are written in Java, a big problem with the iPad but with Android we have exported the code to Darvik which is very easy and with Windows 8 well it's a no brainer.

 

I fully understand that there are industries like photography or art that can benefit from an iPad but most really should pass and by no means am I demeaning the iPad, I love mine. It's a consumer product though not a business one and for those who force it to be will have one tough time.

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post #39 of 39
@Relic.

WebMD on iPad mini is very handy. Also all kind of client-server apps have good usage on tablet platform. Imagine phlebotomist going from room to room in a hospital, collecting specimens, scanning labels and posting on his iPad/Nexus. Don't forget about Cisco VPN client and Citrix for iOS/Android so you can access corporate environment from outside and run apps on Citrix farm.
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