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post #161 of 199
Thread Starter 
hmm - The SSD for me was a lot more difficult to replace because I couldn't get it to fit correctly. I did get it to attach to the SATA port but not to fit in just right.
post #162 of 199
Thread Starter 
WWDC - What do we see? Thoughts?
post #163 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

WWDC - What do we see? Thoughts?

Lots of new software! That of course is obvious. The obvious being the two operating systems but I'm hoping for iWork updates. Why iWork updates. Well simple the software needs it badly, so some of the iWork issues:
  1. The integration between the iOS and Mac versions must improve with the elimination of the file conversions.
  2. Apple needs a new scripting solution that gets that uses a modern language that is consistent on both iOS and Mac OS. Frankly I don't care if it is targeted at iWork only or is a more system wide scripting solution. The goal again is that one file will work correctly on both platforms.
  3. Numbers get vastly improved functionality, with more built in functions and features. Numbers needs to turn into a tool that can solve any mathematical need from engineering, to fianace, to biology to whatever. It needs to become the no excuses spreadsheet.
  4. Numbers is improved so that it is a quality graphing app, that can produce very fine technical graphs. If not maybe Apple produces a standalone graphing app.
  5. iBooks becomes part of iWork and morphs into a more general publishing tool.

Well that is some of the larger ideas for iWork. System software needs lots of improvement with a stress on feature parity. It is really frustrating that a new version of notes on the Mac actually has more features than the iOS version of the app that has been around longer.

As to hardware, probably what you are thinking about, I see a mixed bag with maybe fewer bits of hardware debuting than in the past.. Here is a list of possibilities:
  1. New networking hardware to support the emerging standards for higher speed WiFi. There may be more built in functionality in even the smallest of these.
  2. The new Mac Pro is announced! Actually the timing seems to be about right for a pre announcement and WWDC would be the place to do that if it brings significantly new technology to us. I'm more or less betting that the new iMac will be a big departure from previous machines thus requiring a debut at WWDC to introduce those technologies.
  3. iPhones
  4. Tablets are a possibility.
  5. XMac! I can't give up on this one. Apple simply needs a more balanced desktop that isn't a Mac Pro super computer. This could be a Mini replacement or a device that sits in the lineup just above the Mini. It is not a headless iMac though as it would be easy to service and have some expansion capability.
  6. Note that with the iMac, Mini, Mac Pro or XMac there should be an announcement that one or more of them will start production in the USA. I'm leaning towards either the Mac Pro or the XMac. WWDC would be the place to announce a machine going into production in the USA as we haven't heard anything since the last public comment sometime last year. I'm leaning towards what would be the lower volume machines, however there is a remote possibility that a redesigned Mini will be the "it" model. A Mini built in the USA would require a highly automated factory though, since we have heard nothing about that I suspect that the machine will be a Mac Pro class machine.
  7. New displays.
  8. Co-announcements of new TB based docks or announcements of shipping products.
  9. Partnership announcements with respect to the New Mac Pro. This is extremely likely if the new model is a major departure from previous models. Disk arrays come to mind here.
  10. An iPad/iPhone announcement might reveal new directions in "A" processor technology. I'm really thinking about 64 bit here but we might also see Apple pulling an AMD here and designing the next A series processor with a tightly integrated GPU. That is a GPU that works through the same memory addressing arrangement as the CPU to deliver heterogeneous computing on a chip. In other words the GPU and the CPU have equal ability to access RAM. It might get to the point that one won't even be able to recognize the GPU and the CPU on the chip as distinct features. 2013 might be a little early for this but I think it is coming.
  11. In more general terms expect to see more of Apples A series chips in places you haven't seen them before. For example the network hubs mentioned above or the new TB monitors.
  12. We may see evidence that Apple is licensed to use TB with non Intel CPUs. I honestly can not see Apple adopting TB in partnership with Intel and not assuring that capability.
  13. We may see a doubling or more of flash storage capacities on all devices.
  14. I'd love to hear an announcement that iPhones and iPads will move to 2GB of RAM.
  15. All Mac Minis become quad core machines. The problem here is that it might be a bit to early for some announcements at WWDC. The problem is that Intel seems to be confused about the what's and when's when it comes to Haswell. Further at this point Apple would be wise to trim the Mini lineup to two models with more flexible build to order solutions. Apples marketing Wisdom with respect to the Mini perplexes me so I'm not sure what is up with the model, one thing is obvious they need to stimulate sales somehow.
  16. New Haswell based iMacs announced with shipping to happen in a month. These will be nothing more than a processor bump.

Not much in the way of hardware 😜after all this is a software forum. Ha ha ha.

As an interesting side note, the fact that WWDC sold out in 2 minutes highlights some issues Apple will be having in the future managing and communicating with the developer community. The developer community is currently growing rapidly as such that will likely change the nature of WWDC. Apple has already announced traveling tech for umps to better communicate with the developer community. I'm expecting this sort of thing to expand significantly in the coming years. It just isn't possible for everybody to be served properly at WWDC anymore so the regional conferences will be far more important. Major announcements will likely remain with WWDC but nuts and bolts sessions will likely be repeated many times across the country.

Interesting times are ahead.
post #164 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
  1. The integration between the iOS and Mac versions must improve with the elimination of the file conversions.
  2. Apple needs a new scripting solution that gets that uses a modern language that is consistent on both iOS and Mac OS. Frankly I don't care if it is targeted at iWork only or is a more system wide scripting solution. The goal again is that one file will work correctly on both platforms.
  3. Numbers get vastly improved functionality, with more built in functions and features. Numbers needs to turn into a tool that can solve any mathematical need from engineering, to fianace, to biology to whatever. It needs to become the no excuses spreadsheet.
  4. Numbers is improved so that it is a quality graphing app, that can produce very fine technical graphs. If not maybe Apple produces a standalone graphing app.
  5. iBooks becomes part of iWork and morphs into a more general publishing tool.

  1. New networking hardware to support the emerging standards for higher speed WiFi. There may be more built in functionality in even the smallest of these.
  2. The new Mac Pro is announced! Actually the timing seems to be about right for a pre announcement and WWDC would be the place to do that if it brings significantly new technology to us. I'm more or less betting that the new iMac will be a big departure from previous machines thus requiring a debut at WWDC to introduce those technologies.
  3. iPhones
  4. Tablets are a possibility.
  5. XMac! I can't give up on this one. Apple simply needs a more balanced desktop that isn't a Mac Pro super computer. This could be a Mini replacement or a device that sits in the lineup just above the Mini. It is not a headless iMac though as it would be easy to service and have some expansion capability.
  6. Note that with the iMac, Mini, Mac Pro or XMac there should be an announcement that one or more of them will start production in the USA. I'm leaning towards either the Mac Pro or the XMac. WWDC would be the place to announce a machine going into production in the USA as we haven't heard anything since the last public comment sometime last year. I'm leaning towards what would be the lower volume machines, however there is a remote possibility that a redesigned Mini will be the "it" model. A Mini built in the USA would require a highly automated factory though, since we have heard nothing about that I suspect that the machine will be a Mac Pro class machine.
  7. New displays.
  8. Co-announcements of new TB based docks or announcements of shipping products.
  9. Partnership announcements with respect to the New Mac Pro. This is extremely likely if the new model is a major departure from previous models. Disk arrays come to mind here.
  10. An iPad/iPhone announcement might reveal new directions in "A" processor technology. I'm really thinking about 64 bit here but we might also see Apple pulling an AMD here and designing the next A series processor with a tightly integrated GPU. That is a GPU that works through the same memory addressing arrangement as the CPU to deliver heterogeneous computing on a chip. In other words the GPU and the CPU have equal ability to access RAM. It might get to the point that one won't even be able to recognize the GPU and the CPU on the chip as distinct features. 2013 might be a little early for this but I think it is coming.
  11. In more general terms expect to see more of Apples A series chips in places you haven't seen them before. For example the network hubs mentioned above or the new TB monitors.
  12. We may see evidence that Apple is licensed to use TB with non Intel CPUs. I honestly can not see Apple adopting TB in partnership with Intel and not assuring that capability.
  13. We may see a doubling or more of flash storage capacities on all devices.
  14. I'd love to hear an announcement that iPhones and iPads will move to 2GB of RAM.
  15. All Mac Minis become quad core machines. The problem here is that it might be a bit to early for some announcements at WWDC. The problem is that Intel seems to be confused about the what's and when's when it comes to Haswell. Further at this point Apple would be wise to trim the Mini lineup to two models with more flexible build to order solutions. Apples marketing Wisdom with respect to the Mini perplexes me so I'm not sure what is up with the model, one thing is obvious they need to stimulate sales somehow.
  16. New Haswell based iMacs announced with shipping to happen in a month. These will be nothing more than a processor bump.

Not much in the way of hardware 😜after all this is a software forum. Ha ha ha.

As an interesting side note, the fact that WWDC sold out in 2 minutes highlights some issues Apple will be having in the future managing and communicating with the developer community. The developer community is currently growing rapidly as such that will likely change the nature of WWDC. Apple has already announced traveling tech for umps to better communicate with the developer community. I'm expecting this sort of thing to expand significantly in the coming years. It just isn't possible for everybody to be served properly at WWDC anymore so the regional conferences will be far more important. Major announcements will likely remain with WWDC but nuts and bolts sessions will likely be repeated many times across the country.

Interesting times are ahead.

 

I'm floored. I would love if every single thing on both these lists happened and think they could very plausibly…

 


XMac! I can't give up on this one. Apple simply needs a more balanced desktop that isn't a Mac Pro super computer. This could be a Mini replacement or a device that sits in the lineup just above the Mini. It is not a headless iMac though as it would be easy to service and have some expansion capability.

 

You had to throw something implausible in there, huh? lol.gif

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #165 of 199
Thread Starter 
If Apple did make an xMac type machine it would not be called the xMac and frankly I think that would be a silly name. I would probably just go with a smaller Mac Pro and keep that for now.
post #166 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I'm floored. I would love if every single thing on both these lists happened and think they could very plausibly…
I think some of these are very likely! They won't all happen at WWDC at the same time of course.
Quote:

You had to throw something implausible in there, huh? lol.gif

Maybe not an XMac but Apple is designing a machine to be built in the USA. I could see the Mini getting dropped to be replace by a new machine designed for automated production in the USA. The greatest likely hood is that the Mac Pro will be manufactured in the USA but you never know.

The interesting thing is that my curiosity is being heightened about what the actual machine will be that is assembled here. There are a couple of possibilities, it will be interesting to see which way apple goes.
post #167 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

If Apple did make an xMac type machine it would not be called the xMac and frankly I think that would be a silly name. I would probably just go with a smaller Mac Pro and keep that for now.

Of course not, XMac is just a term used here to designate a desktop design that fits between the Mini and the Mac Pro in Apples line up. You can't take discussions about non existent hardware to literally. After all each of us has a different image of what an XMac should be in his mind.

Now what we need is a few leaks spilling out of the supply chain about the new desktops.
post #168 of 199
Thread Starter 
I would be more in favor of better graphics on a Mac if the PC game industry catered more to RPGs and action-RPGs. Perhaps I don't look hard enough though you won't find me playing Portal, Crysis, or Battlefield. If I was into those games, I would have bought a gaming PC or possibly a gaming laptop though more the former in order to stay below $1,000.

Having said that, I do wish the best for Intel because they need to step it up in the GPU arena.

Criticizing the xMac name, I have to really think about what I would call a more powerful headless mini. Nothing comes to mind except for a smaller Mac Pro. It would probably weigh about 10 pounds, have a discrete graphics card that is better than the 21.5" iMac but less than the ultimate 27" iMac, SSD, and mobile quad-core processor.
post #169 of 199
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
Maybe not an XMac but Apple is designing a machine to be built in the USA.

 

Didn't we already see that the new iMac was that machine? And I'm pretty sure my Mac Pro says "Assembled in USA" on it, at least… Maybe that's not what they meant.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #170 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Didn't we already see that the new iMac was that machine? And I'm pretty sure my Mac Pro says "Assembled in USA" on it, at least… Maybe that's not what they meant.
That is a really good question, if that was said I missed it. Last i knew the iMac was still made in CHina.

The way I look at it, if Apple had a US based manufacturing line up and running in the USA right now they would be making a big deal over it. It would certainly be a motivation for many customers. In any event I would expect a machine that could easily be adapted to automation, the Mini or a replacement for the Mini seems like the rational machine to do US based manufacturing on.

As for you iMac give it a once over as it should say on it where it was built. Also was it a build to order machine? Usually it goes something like designed in California built in China.
post #171 of 199
Thread Starter 
SemiAccurate looked to have an exclusive on what GPU the Haswell MacBook Pro was going to use though of course it was to paid subscribers only. It would appear they are using AMD's Sea Islands GPUs at least in the 15". Did the info leak anywhere?
post #172 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

SemiAccurate looked to have an exclusive on what GPU the Haswell MacBook Pro was going to use though of course it was to paid subscribers only. It would appear they are using AMD's Sea Islands GPUs at least in the 15". Did the info leak anywhere?

I haven't seen nor heard anything but frankly I'm not surprised, going NVidia was a mistake in my mind. Neither GPU maker is introducing new architectures this year but AMD is tweaking the current design a bit more that NVidia appears to be doing. Beyond that AMD is all in with respect to heterogeneous computing which ties well with Apples approach to software.
post #173 of 199
Thread Starter 
I have no interest in paying for a Semiaccurate subscription. It's $1,000 a year for a full subscription and when I check the site, half of the preview articles I am not interested in anyway.

Haswell graphics should prove to be good on the integrated side and Maxwell (and whatever AMD has next year) should prove to be interesting on the discrete side.
post #174 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Haswell graphics should prove to be good on the integrated side and Maxwell (and whatever AMD has next year) should prove to be interesting on the discrete side.

If they went NVidia, it would probably be the 750M and for AMD, they could go with the 8790M, which should be around the same performance as the 750M:

http://techreport.com/review/24086/a-first-look-at-amd-radeon-hd-8790m/6

For some reason, AMD is much better than NVidia when it comes to OpenCL:

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/153467-amd-destroys-nvidia-bitcoin-mining

so it would be a plus on that side to use AMD. A lot of software developers still use CUDA though so it would mean huge losses for those cases. I think the NVidia 600 series was a good choice as they run cool and have lots of software support and features like FXAA (very fast anti-aliasing). Apple has been doing a strange thing where they switch NVidia/AMD every other year. If they keep it up, it will be all AMD this year and then back to Maxwell next year. Kind of annoying habit but I suppose it keeps it fair.
post #175 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I have no interest in paying for a Semiaccurate subscription. It's $1,000 a year for a full subscription and when I check the site, half of the preview articles I am not interested in anyway.
Come on you have deep pockets!
Quote:
Haswell graphics should prove to be good on the integrated side and Maxwell (and whatever AMD has next year) should prove to be interesting on the discrete side.

Never trust Intel or its lackeys like Anandtech. When the hardware arrives we will hopefully see what real world behavior is like. Especially with the drivers Apple ships.
post #176 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

If they went NVidia, it would probably be the 750M and for AMD, they could go with the 8790M, which should be around the same performance as the 750M:

http://techreport.com/review/24086/a-first-look-at-amd-radeon-hd-8790m/6

For some reason, AMD is much better than NVidia when it comes to OpenCL:

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/153467-amd-destroys-nvidia-bitcoin-mining
I don't know about that specific benchmark but NVidia is absolutely terrible at double precision.
Quote:
so it would be a plus on that side to use AMD. A lot of software developers still use CUDA though so it would mean huge losses for those cases.
True but CUDA is dying in the vine. The trend is to open solutions that are hardware agnostic.
Quote:
I think the NVidia 600 series was a good choice as they run cool and have lots of software support and features like FXAA (very fast anti-aliasing). Apple has been doing a strange thing where they switch NVidia/AMD every other year. If they keep it up, it will be all AMD this year and then back to Maxwell next year. Kind of annoying habit but I suppose it keeps it fair.
Extremely annoying if you ask me.
post #177 of 199
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Come on you have deep pockets! Never trust Intel or its lackeys like Anandtech. When the hardware arrives we will hopefully see what real world behavior is like. Especially with the drivers Apple ships.

But I have to save for next Mac. : (

I like Anandtech but I don't treat it as gospel and for someone like me I think the Haswell graphics should run the one game I want just fine. If I wanted to game more and there was more variety, I would buy something with a discrete graphics card Mac or otherwise.
post #178 of 199

Hope Apple bring back the big boy MBP 17" for audio visual pros. Interesting how since they stopped servicing the high end in favor of students and no doubt at the behest of Cook and his bean counting mediocrity, Apple showed the first decline in profits in 10 years, stock price down 50%, and losing market share in a major way to Samsung and Android. Maybe just one big coincidence.

post #179 of 199

Anybody know when are the new MBPs coming out? I went into an Apple store today and they were all out of the 15" non-Retnia displays with the anti-glare screen and the salesperson told me that if I wanted one, I'd have to order it through Apple from now on.

post #180 of 199
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajan Long View Post

Hope Apple bring back the big boy MBP 17" for audio visual pros. Interesting how since they stopped servicing the high end in favor of students and no doubt at the behest of Cook and his bean counting mediocrity, Apple showed the first decline in profits in 10 years, stock price down 50%, and losing market share in a major way to Samsung and Android. Maybe just one big coincidence.

Tim Cook is very monotone and doesn't deal with the reality distortion field. Phil Schiller is more to the point when he delivers his part of the keynote because he gets right to the core with the tech specs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sc_markt View Post

Anybody know when are the new MBPs coming out? I went into an Apple store today and they were all out of the 15" non-Retnia displays with the anti-glare screen and the salesperson told me that if I wanted one, I'd have to order it through Apple from now on.

Rumored for WWDC 2013.
post #181 of 199

It is about time Apple starts building their machines in the states.Not dam China!
 

post #182 of 199
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

It is about time Apple starts building their machines in the states.Not dam China!

I am not a fan of the working conditions with Foxconn but here's the problem. Apple can make the aluminum chassis in the United States but what about the display, CPU, GPU, memory, etc.

If you want a truly American made machine, then everything should be made there, no?

Computers are one of those things where it is what it is in terms of not being made in America. Thankfully you can find tools, clothes, etc. still made here in the USA.

Moving on... I'm kind of happy they aren't getting rid of the classic unibody MacBook Pro yet, I still like it and think the retina has a bit of a ways to go.
post #183 of 199

I heard the Apple will be making perhaps the mac mini in the states and all the parts will come from there also. Hopefully no more getting parts from China! I really hope Apple follows through with this and more employment will happen also.
 

post #184 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I am not a fan of the working conditions with Foxconn but here's the problem.
Constantly repeating something does make it true. Beyond that what makes you think that American viewpoints and policies are the correct one. For example what is with the idea that one has to be 18 to work in a factory?

I only ask that one because I was 17 when I graduated from high school.
Quote:
Apple can make the aluminum chassis in the United States but what about the display, CPU, GPU, memory, etc.
So where does the Aluminum ore come from? You can take this to great lengths for no reason.
Quote:
If you want a truly American made machine, then everything should be made there, no?
No because that is seldom the case and is not the norm for our country.
Quote:
Computers are one of those things where it is what it is in terms of not being made in America. Thankfully you can find tools, clothes, etc. still made here in the USA.
Yes but is every part of that tool produced or sourced in the USA. Maybe the steel is but what about the chrome, the forging press to shape the metal or the hundreds of other things that go into the making of a tool.
Quote:
Moving on... I'm kind of happy they aren't getting rid of the classic unibody MacBook Pro yet, I still like it and think the retina has a bit of a ways to go.

I actually like the retina machine except for the lack of secondary storage.
post #185 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

I heard the Apple will be making perhaps the mac mini in the states and all the parts will come from there also.
Which machine gets produced here isn't certain yet, some of use are leaning Mac Pro. Tim Cook has commented publicly on this, but I highly doubt all of the parts will come from the USA. The reality is that some of this stuff simply isn't made here.
Quote:
Hopefully no more getting parts from China!
They have to come from someplace.
Quote:
I really hope Apple follows through with this and more employment will happen also.

Don't hold your breath about employment. The factory is likely to be highly automated. The sub contractors may simply pick up the work with existing staff. It would be nice to see an explosion in employment but nothing about this project promises that. Hopefully Apple is underplaying the extent of the project and thus the spin off in economic benefit. At this time there is a limit to what Apple can say and no give away to much info to the competition.
post #186 of 199
Thread Starter 
wizard69 - What I basically mean is that what Apple is doing is a step in the right direction.

Computers are one of those things like cars where not everything can come from one single place nor should they have to. Simpler things however such as clothes and tools are different though.

This year should be good as the cards will be a bit faster than the 650M and then Maxwell will be a huge improvement from there. After that, it's all smooth sailing.
post #187 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

wizard69 - What I basically mean is that what Apple is doing is a step in the right direction.
Only time will tell. I can tell you right now getting qualified people, willing to work, is not an easy task in the USA right now. The welfare state has destroyed the work ethic of a good portion of our population. If Apple really wants this program to be successful they should be demanding a massive cut in welfare benefits. It is interesting that many of the states Cook mention are not part of the leftist east. Maybe Cooks politics aren't as dangerous as some suspect.
Quote:
Computers are one of those things like cars where not everything can come from one single place nor should they have to. Simpler things however such as clothes and tools are different though.
What people forget is that there are many other economies on this planet beyond the borders of the USA. They have a right to take part in the worlds economy. Demanding made in the USA products is often short sighted. Manufacturing is certainly important but so is being a good neighbor.
Quote:
This year should be good as the cards will be a bit faster than the 650M and then Maxwell will be a huge improvement from there. After that, it's all smooth sailing.
I don't buy this idea of clean sailing because it implies that computers are fast enough that one more rev is all we need. In my mind that is garbage, we have a very long way to go. Ultimately the Mac OS needs to evolve to the point where a user interacts with an AI at the highest level. We aren't even close yet.
post #188 of 199
Thread Starter 
Oh no! Not at all fast enough! No, no, no, and hell no!

I mean with Maxwell that the retina MacBook Pro will hit its stride and only get better.

When the back to the Mac event was held in 2010, I felt that's when the MacBook Air hit its stride and from there it has only gotten better.

Once the MacBook Pro went to the aluminum unibody construction in 2008, that was it!

As for made in the USA products, first off I am aware there are sweatshops in the US. Having said that, look at the three incidents involving clothing factories in the Middle East.

1. April 2013 (or so), factory in Bangladesh collapses and at least 800 people (probably more) died.

2. November 2012 - Factory in Bangladesh catches fire, 200+ people perish

3. Septemeber 2012 - Factory in Pakistan catches fire, 200+ people perish

This is inexcusable and I do not want to buy clothes from a countries that hate us, that treat their workers like pieces of trash, that use child labor, and so on and so forth.

PM me wizard, because we have much to discuss.

There are places out there in America where quality products are made by workers for a fair wage and they are not overly expensive even in this economy. Do they cost more than you would pay at Wal Mart? Of course. But are they priced out of reach. No they are not.
post #189 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Only time will tell. I can tell you right now getting qualified people, willing to work, is not an easy task in the USA right now. The welfare state has destroyed the work ethic of a good portion of our population. If Apple really wants this program to be successful they should be demanding a massive cut in welfare benefits. It is interesting that many of the states Cook mention are not part of the leftist east. Maybe Cooks politics aren't as dangerous as some suspect.
What people forget is that there are many other economies on this planet beyond the borders of the USA. They have a right to take part in the worlds economy. Demanding made in the USA products is often short sighted. Manufacturing is certainly important but so is being a good neighbor.
I don't buy this idea of clean sailing because it implies that computers are fast enough that one more rev is all we need. In my mind that is garbage, we have a very long way to go. Ultimately the Mac OS needs to evolve to the point where a user interacts with an AI at the highest level. We aren't even close yet.
100% right!!!!!!! The demands of future programs will increase exponentially. To exploit these new capabilities will require ever more powerful hardware. This is why I have kept harping on the high end (Mac Pro and 17" MBP) and how important it is for Apple not to exit that market. As General Patton said so eloquently in WW2: I don't want to have to capture the same ground twice. Also the high end tends to sell regardless of the macro economy, either because those buyers use it for a living, or they are rich and just want the best. 
post #190 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Oh no! Not at all fast enough! No, no, no, and hell no!

I mean with Maxwell that the retina MacBook Pro will hit its stride and only get better.

When the back to the Mac event was held in 2010, I felt that's when the MacBook Air hit its stride and from there it has only gotten better.
Mac Book AIR is an interesting machine if you follow its genesis and maturation into what it is today. Originally it was just another overly high priced Apple excutive toy. Apparently somebody at Apple recognized that they where onto something and did a 180 marketing wise targeting a completely different market with the machine. It has become one of Apples bigger success stories.

You may call it hitting its stride or I might call it a correction to the original phony marketing plans. Either way it shows that Apple is sometimes on top of the ball game. I'm just interested in seeing them make the same smart moves with the desktop machines.
Quote:
Once the MacBook Pro went to the aluminum unibody construction in 2008, that was it!

As for made in the USA products, first off I am aware there are sweatshops in the US. Having said that, look at the three incidents involving clothing factories in the Middle East.
Some people call them sweat shops and it is a fitting term. However some industries are inherently dangerous which people in the US don't seem to understand anymore.
Quote:
1. April 2013 (or so), factory in Bangladesh collapses and at least 800 people (probably more) died.

2. November 2012 - Factory in Bangladesh catches fire, 200+ people perish

3. Septemeber 2012 - Factory in Pakistan catches fire, 200+ people perish
Which has nothing to do with China. Bringing up these countries is like blaming the USA for something that happened in Canada. The problem with dealing with China, is that China is on an expansionist bing and we are basically fueling their military.
Quote:
This is inexcusable and I do not want to buy clothes from a countries that hate us, that treat their workers like pieces of trash, that use child labor, and so on and so forth.
Again China is Bangladesh and this discussion isn't about clothes. Everybody, for whatever reason wants to believe that the workers in China are treated especially bad but that isn't the truth at all. Effectively worker treatment is as variable there as it is here.
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PM me wizard, because we have much to discuss.
Not really.
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There are places out there in America where quality products are made by workers for a fair wage and they are not overly expensive even in this economy. Do they cost more than you would pay at Wal Mart? Of course. But are they priced out of reach. No they are not.
The problem is getting people to actually pay the asking price. It is a lot harder than you might think as most Americans are hell bent on the lowest prices possible. Except of course when they feel like something trendy or brand name.

Just look at what happened to JC Penny when the marketing excutive from Apple took over. The customer base of that company had the idea of shopping for sales engrained into their mentality so deep they still can't grasp the fact that they where often paying more for sale items than they where worth. In fact Apple is rather unique in their ability to generate customers without resorting to discounting and other phony techniques to draw customers. I mean really when was the last time you saw Apple raise the list price on something just so they could sell it for 30% off the next week? In many sectors the buying public has been so conditioned that a retailer can't even compete without resorting to discounting, cheap products or imports.

It is really sad but ask your self this how many people even look at the labels? How many are even remotely aware if what is happening in these countries? How many of those that do look bring up their concerns with store management?
post #191 of 199
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
Another duplicate post! Is AI on the blink?

 

No, you're just not used to seeing them because I always deleted them almost immediately. This is how it has always been.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #192 of 199
Thread Starter 
wizard69 - Yeah the oil industry for one thing is very dangerous and Americans don't get that.

And yes I agree about us fueling China's military though there are companies that use China for clothes, toys (that ended up having lead paint), dog food (which also ended up having lead in it.

Oh and worse, I read somewhere that some places in China were using cadmium over lead and cadmium is 5x more toxic.
post #193 of 199
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


I don't buy this idea of clean sailing because it implies that computers are fast enough that one more rev is all we need. In my mind that is garbage, we have a very long way to go. Ultimately the Mac OS needs to evolve to the point where a user interacts with an AI at the highest level. We aren't even close yet.

 

OEMs are often looking at year to year changes in supporting technology. Intel's year over year X86 changes aren't likely to change the way most people accomplish their tasks at the moment. In spite of it still being minimal, things like GPGPU represent an entirely different potential. Anything with the potential for exponential performance gains means it may change what is feasible at the personal electronics level. When it's just 10 or 15% in a given annual cycle, interest shifts to other areas of improvement. That may offer some help in certain areas, but for the most part if one machine is inadequate to run a set of tasks, adding 10-15% on paper isn't going to suddenly make it tolerable. X86 hardware has just been a little slow on gains lately.

post #194 of 199
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, you're just not used to seeing them because I always deleted them almost immediately. This is how it has always been.
I don't know I've never had this many duplicates on AI site. Not from my postings anyways. The site was real sluggish at the time.
post #195 of 199
Thread Starter 
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I don't know I've never had this many duplicates on AI site. Not from my postings anyways. The site was real sluggish at the time.

I have seen triple posts from you. Give the site a second to load! lol.gif

Anyway, not sure if I mentioned this already but here's hoping LG fixed their display issues this time around. That would suck if the Rev. B rMBP had the same ghosting issues as Rev. A
post #196 of 199
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Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I have seen triple posts from you. Give the site a second to load! lol.gif

Anyway, not sure if I mentioned this already but here's hoping LG fixed their display issues this time around. That would suck if the Rev. B rMBP had the same ghosting issues as Rev. A

We could see entirely new display technology this time around. That is if Sharps IGZO tech is truly ready to go. Of course new technology means new characteristics. We are a long way from perfection in LCD displays.
post #197 of 199
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


We could see entirely new display technology this time around. That is if Sharps IGZO tech is truly ready to go. Of course new technology means new characteristics. We are a long way from perfection in LCD displays.


In certain specific aspects they're just leveling off when comparing to CRTs that sold into similar price ranges. An example would be controllable contrast. Ideally you would have one of high bit depth to proof corrections for other device ranges. Some of the display manufacturers have tried this. Prior to that black and white points shifted simultaneously as a display was dialed up or down, which is still the case with almost all of them. Getting away from the backlit concept in general would be a big help. It would eliminate backlight bleed which is often solved by spreading out whatever can't be directly blocked (especially around corners) and using secondary panel blocking to capture some of the remainder. It's not very cost effective, and I don't think Apple does anything like that. Some of the imac photos I've seen have looked kind of bad in this regard, but it's difficult to determine accurately. When things are photographed to where the black now looks whatever off shade of dark grey, things are not really as you would see them sitting in front of the display.

 

Just hunting down whatever is causing the current image persistence should be sufficient for the rmbp. Imacs have used LG panels for many years. The last ones to show significant image persistence in typically in the second year or beyond were the 24" models, or at least that hardware era. I haven't seen image persistence on other display brands in years. It's just a revival of an old problem that has been solved before on similar technology..

post #198 of 199
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Originally Posted by hmm View Post


In certain specific aspects they're just leveling off when comparing to CRTs that sold into similar price ranges.
This is true but LCDs have one big advantage, that maddening flicker is gone. Maybe I'm more sensitive than others but my first LCD screen was a massive relief. Frankly that old LCD was rather pathetic compared to what is available today. The thing is before the LCD I thought the low resolution was causing me the problems with the CRT.
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An example would be controllable contrast. Ideally you would have one of high bit depth to proof corrections for other device ranges. Some of the display manufacturers have tried this. Prior to that black and white points shifted simultaneously as a display was dialed up or down, which is still the case with almost all of them. Getting away from the backlit concept in general would be a big help. It would eliminate backlight bleed which is often solved by spreading out whatever can't be directly blocked (especially around corners) and using secondary panel blocking to capture some of the remainder. It's not very cost effective, and I don't think Apple does anything like that. Some of the imac photos I've seen have looked kind of bad in this regard, but it's difficult to determine accurately. When things are photographed to where the black now looks whatever off shade of dark grey, things are not really as you would see them sitting in front of the display.
Speaking of CRTs, do you know how hard it is to even find black and white CRT based video monitors these days? An application in the plant requires the operating features of a CRT tube and you just can't find them any more. At least not in the quality required.
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Just hunting down whatever is causing the current image persistence should be sufficient for the rmbp. Imacs have used LG panels for many years. The last ones to show significant image persistence in typically in the second year or beyond were the 24" models, or at least that hardware era. I haven't seen image persistence on other display brands in years. It's just a revival of an old problem that has been solved before on similar technology..
True again but Sharps screens would offer other advantages for any portable device especially for power savings.
post #199 of 199
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


This is true but LCDs have one big advantage, that maddening flicker is gone. Maybe I'm more sensitive than others but my first LCD screen was a massive relief. Frankly that old LCD was rather pathetic compared to what is available today. The thing is before the LCD I thought the low resolution was causing me the problems with the CRT.

I hated that stupid flicker, although quality ones were better than cheap ones. Some of the early LCD displays gave me headaches. The early Cinema displays Apple used performed poorly at low brightness settings, and the high brightness settings were ridiculous in a moderately lit environment. The other thing I disliked was the resolution of older ones. At that time just a 1600x1200 display was still extremely expensive.

 

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Speaking of CRTs, do you know how hard it is to even find black and white CRT based video monitors these days? An application in the plant requires the operating features of a CRT tube and you just can't find them any more. At least not in the quality required.


I would guess that whatever businesses needed them stockpiled as many as possible. Even specialty hardware, which tends to be extremely conservative, switched a few years ago. I mean things like dicom conformant (medical use) displays are lcds. Broadcast monitors switched over. Adoption is typically slower in those areas due to extreme cost and lower quality for early adopters. Some of the earlier broadcast quality lcds started in the $10k range. Much of the higher end reference hardware like Barco has been out of production for a number of years, so I am unsurprised you would have trouble locating one new or at least within spec.

 

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True again but Sharps screens would offer other advantages for any portable device especially for power savings.

 

It reminds me of thunderbolt when it was still called Lightpeak in that when something isn't in current use on a familiar product, it gets hyped a lot. Sharp has shown off IGZO hardware at a lot of trade shows. It looks impressive, but I have yet to see it show up in anything. I don't know the advantages or disadvantages compared to what is already on the market, and trade show offerings tend to involve favorable reference implementations. If the power savings is really there, it could be useful beyond just notebooks. Heat is a major factor in color stability of lcds. I knew a couple white papers on the topic, but they don't seem to be there anymore. Anyway the power savings is huge in a lot of areas beyond just notebooks. It would be great if they live up to the hype.

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