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Judge agrees to add newly released Apple and Samsung devices to upcoming trial

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
A California federal judge on Wendesday agreed with additional stipulations filed jointly by Apple and Samsung in which each party sought to supplement its case in an upcoming trial slated to begin in 2014.

Galaxy S III mini
Samsung's Galaxy S III mini has been dropped from Apple's suit. | Source: Samsung


The order on the parties' amended joint stipulations, handed down by Magistrate Judge Paul Grewal, adds a number of new devices to the case and withdraws one as a result of court filings from November 2012. The filing is part of Apple's Galaxy Nexus case and is not to be confused with the Apple v. Samsung court trial which ended in August.

As stated in the stipulation, Apple adds the Galaxy Note II, Galaxy S III with Android 4.1, Rugby Pro, Galaxy Tab 8.9 Wi-Fi and Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 to the case while Samsung tacks on the iPhone 5. The Galaxy S III mini was on the list of devices alleged to have infringed Apple's utility patents, but assertions against the device were dropped after Samsung reported that it was not actively importing or selling the handset in the U.S.

With the Galaxy Nexus trial so far out -- currently scheduled to begin on March 31, 2014 -- there will likely be more devices added and further disputes filed before the fact discovery process is completed in July of this year.

post #2 of 28
I will freely admit Samsung did not copy from Apple the ability to transfer files by touching two phones together. Not surprisingly, no one has ever done that other than the people in the commercial.
post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I will freely admit Samsung did not copy from Apple the ability to transfer files by touching two phones together. Not surprisingly, no one has ever done that other than the people in the commercial.

It's a dumb thing to do. With omni-directional wireless tech it simply makes no sense to have that extra action to move files from one device to another.

Recently my parents visited and I watched them point and air-jab the car's remote control lock in the direction of the car to lock it. I wondered if the generation has been born yet that will not grow up thinking in terms of a physical object or line-of-sight wireless like with IR.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I will freely admit Samsung did not copy from Apple the ability to transfer files by touching two phones together. Not surprisingly, no one has ever done that other than the people in the commercial.

 

New to smartphones?

 

Palm users were beaming (that's even the word they used) apps and files between each other for years before the iPhone or Galaxies were a twinkle in their companies' eyes.

 

As for today's method, I do it all the time when my son-in-law is in town.  We touch to transfer photos, addresses, contacts, websites, apps, directions, you name it.   For ease of doing all those things when you're sitting next to each other, it's unbeatable.

 

Obviously if you're not next to each other, then you must use other methods that require extra action.


Edited by KDarling - 1/16/13 at 8:34pm
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

New to smartphones?

Palm users were beaming (that's even the word they used) apps and files between each other for years before the iPhone or Galaxies were a twinkle in their companies' eyes.

As for today's method, I do it all the time when my son-in-law is in town.  We touch to transfer photos, addresses, contacts, apps, directions, you name it.   Beats the heck out of any other method.

This is a stupid physical bump which uses the accelerometer to indicate the action has been accepted.

I just remembered this existed as an iPhone app 3 years ago: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bump/id305479724?mt=8

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I will freely admit Samsung did not copy from Apple the ability to transfer files by touching two phones together. Not surprisingly, no one has ever done that other than the people in the commercial.

Anyone remember Bump?

Edit: OMG... you beat me by a minute Solip!
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Edit: OMG... you beat me by a minute Solip!
(link)

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #8 of 28
Perhaps touching is faster than selecting a recipient from a list or telling Siri, but only in the case where you are actually physically close. What if I am upstairs and want to send a photo, do I run downstairs and give the recipient the digital high-five. Of course not!
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

This is a stupid physical bump which uses the accelerometer to indicate the action has been accepted.

 

No sir, it's NFC.  No bump required.   Heck, you don't even have to touch, but it's easier to get close enough to trigger the transfer, if you do gently place their backs together.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

Perhaps touching is faster than selecting a recipient from a list or telling Siri, but only in the case where you are actually physically close. 

 

Right.  That's what I said.  When you're physically close, it's unbeatable.  Otherwise, not.

 

It's just like saying that if you have WiFi available, it's cheaper than using your data plan.   Of course, if WIFi isn't available, then you must use the data plan.

post #10 of 28
The bump had this well before NFC, guess what? Nobody used it
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

The bump had this well before NFC, guess what? Nobody used it

 

It was less useful, too.  Bump only transferred files, and later photos.

 

As I said, beaming transfers files, photos, contacts, websites, maps, appstore refs, and other things.

 

For example, we use it when taking multiple cars to a new destination.  One person pulls up directions for Google Nav, and we all touch phones, which instantly transfers the same navigation info to each.

 

It's amazing how people will diss functionality that they don't have and/or have never used.

post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

This is a stupid physical bump which uses the accelerometer to indicate the action has been accepted.

I just remembered this existed as an iPhone app 3 years ago: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bump/id305479724?mt=8

Doing this as a reply instead of an edit. S Beam in the Samsung Galaxy S III appears to use NFC, not WiFi or BT that is activated by the accelerometer. This means that it doesn't necessarily have to bump but they do have to be close enough to work and then hold that position long enough to complete.

Here are the instructions I found on a site pimping the feature.
Quote:
S Beam

This nifty feature uses Near Field Communication (NFC) technology to get past the Bluetooth pairing process. Basically, you can share content with another Galaxy S III user by gently bumping the backs of the phones together. Once you’ve activated S Beam, you can take a photo of an event or whatever and share that photo with a colleague later by simply bumping S III backs together.

Here’s how to enable this feature:

Tap the menu button
Tap Settings
Tap More Settings
Tap S Beam
Slide the On/Off slider to the right to switch it on
Now, to beam a specific photo, open the photo in the Gallery app, and then bump the back of your S III against the back of your colleague’s S III.

This seems like a huge hassle to me. A contact might be feasible compared to linking with BT but a photo will take too long. NFC only has a 20cm max range and 13 to 53KBps data rate. Think slower than dialup and imagine trying to move one photo from your 8Mpx camera. In reality if you want to send even something as simple as a Contact you'd likely just type in their phone number into Messages to send the vCard.

I have to say that Samsung almost had me fooled with this one.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Doing this as a reply instead of an edit. S Beam in the Samsung Galaxy S III appears to use NFC, not WiFi or BT that is activated by the accelerometer. This means that it doesn't necessarily have to bump but they do have to be close enough to work and then hold that position long enough to complete.

 

Nope, you don't have to hold them together to complete.  NFC is merely used to kick off the comm setup.   Bluetooth or WiFi is then used for the actual transfer for speed and distance.

 

Quote:

Here are the instructions I found on a site pimping the feature.  (...)

 

You printed the instructions for turning on the feature to begin with.  You only have to do that once, ever.

 

After that, it's as easy and quick as it looks in the ads.   Just put the phones close together, touch the screen to okay the transfer, and you can move away while it completes the transfer (which is often done before you do move away).


Edited by KDarling - 1/16/13 at 8:57pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Nope, you don't have to hold them together to complete.  NFC is merely used to kick off the comm setup.   Bluetooth or WiFi is then used for the actual transfer for speed and distance.

You printed the instructions for turning on the feature to begin with.  You only have to do that once, ever.

After that, it's as easy as it looks in the ads.   Just touch backs, touch the screen to okay the transfer, and you're done.

1) So it kicks you off WiFi to do this transfer?

2) I am not a fan of having an NFC-based authentication that is always on and ready to receive data even after you'd moved away from the device that initiated it. Surely there is some security that has been stated. You have to okay the transfer on screen but what about after that?


edit: OK, so S Beam is an extension of Android Beam. S Beam uses NFC to setup the connection, as you state, to setup a WiFi Direct connection. I see no evidence of BT as an option. At least WiFi Direct means it's the fastest P2P option. Android Beam just uses NFC.

Here is a video of the app in use. This is not as simple and smooth as in the Samsung ad. It looks like you have to affirm the link whilst still making the NFC link which you'll see is not user friendly. I can't imagine using that over sending an iMessage, email or using Dropbox.


Edited by SolipsismX - 1/16/13 at 9:05pm

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) So it kicks you off WiFi to do this transfer?

 

Kicks off?  No.  Temporarily using peer-to-peer WiFi is invisible to you.  If you're using WiFi for web surfing, for example, you go back to it seamlessly.

 

2) I am not a fan of having an NFC-based authentication that is always on and ready to receive data even after you'd moved away from the device that initiated it. Surely there is some security that has been stated. You have to okay the transfer on screen but what about after that?
 

It's only good for one transfer each time.

 

Since you seem to be a pretty intelligent and nice person, let me explain NFC initiated transfers.  It's pretty cool, really.

 

There's a common NFC message protocol that sends a MIME type or URL to the other device.   That's all it does, is say "Hey I have this type of thing for you."   What the other device does with that information is up to that phone and/or what you've told it to do with that type of info.

 

For example, if presented with a website URL, the receiving phone will usually open a web browser to display that URL, since that's why you initiated the transfer.   It's not required, but it makes the most sense.

 

Likewise, many phones will see a video MIME type, set up a wireless file transfer, and then play the video, because that makes sense to the user.  Of course, with Android, you can set up different default apps, so you could instead have incoming videos open in a video editor.  All sorts of possibilities.

 

Btw, this NFC message protocol is common to all phones that have NFC.   All that's needed is for the receiving phone to know what to do with the incoming request.   For example, you should be able to initiate file transfers between NFC equipped Blackberry and Android devices in just the same way as above.   Unfortunately, BB's don't support a lot of file types, so NFC beaming is more limited with them, but this could be improved as time goes by.


Edited by KDarling - 1/16/13 at 9:20pm
post #16 of 28
The reason that Samsung markets it is because it is extremely simple. Simply tap to phones together to share something. They are not marketing this for the ability to share stuff by tapping stuff back to back samsung is marketing this to share the stuff easily. Can you simply tap any iphone together to share? (without an extra app?)
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Kicks off?  No.  Temporarily using peer-to-peer WiFi is invisible to you.  If you're using WiFi for web surfing, for example, you go back to it seamlessly.

Yeah, kicks off unless they have some service like AirDrop where it can maintain two separate wireless connections but I'm not aware of that being available for phone WiFI.

On a phone it's really a big deal because you'd automatically be pushed back to cellular but let's say Aple had this feature in iOS. What would happen if you had 50MB of photos to transfer from an iPod Touch to an iPad with WiFi. No internet during the transfer unless it had the AirDrop capable HW but that's another issue since AirDrop has been excruciatingly slow my testing.

I'm still not seeing how this is a good feature since you have to initiate the transfer within the NFC loop. Having two devices being held up and then pressing a button on screen. I find this to be a chore to do that with the virtual button for taking a photo with my phone and that doesn't have to be proximal to another device.

I thought S Beam was a better feature before this thread. Now I think it's just a hooky feature that has a very small window of utility compared to other transfer methods.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Here is a video of the app in use. This is not as simple and smooth as in the Samsung ad. It looks like you have to affirm the link whilst still making the NFC link which you'll see is not user friendly. I can't imagine using that over sending an iMessage, email or using Dropbox.

 

Did you watch that video?    Did you see her do the YouTube transfer?

 

All she does is hold up the phone to the other phone and tap the screen with your finger to okay the transfer.  Done.

 

So I'm not sure what you're talking about.   It's just that simple and smooth.

 

It's handy when you're with family, buddies, your wife.   Plus it has another advantage over using email or IM... it's totally anonymous!   You could be in a group of new friends and need to give someone a map, but you don't want to give away your phone number or email address.   No problem, just touch and transfer.  No personal info required.

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Did you watch that video?    Did you see her do the YouTube transfer?

All she does is hold up the phone to the other phone and tap the screen with your finger to okay the transfer.  Done.

So I'm not sure what you're talking about.   It's just that simple and smooth.

It's handy when you're with family, buddies, your wife.   Plus it has another advantage over using email or IM... it's totally anonymous!   You could be in a group of new friends and need to give someone a map, but you don't want to give away your phone number or email address.   No problem, just touch and transfer.  No personal info required.

That was not simple and smooth. It wasn't comfortable or natural to watch her try to tap the screen whilst holding up the device. Also, it looks like they transferred a URL in each case. One for YouTube and one for CNET. At the very least it's sloppy reporting on their part to say it was a video.

You make be able to make a case where you want to create a connection to transfer stuff to some anonymous person like some 70's key party but I can't think of s a single time where I wanted to do that. Anonymity means I don't transfer anything with you. Zip, zero, zilch. If we're gonna touch phones you can damn well bet we know each other.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #20 of 28
Quote:

Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

 

Android Beam just uses NFC.
 

Android Beam uses wifi after the NFC connection

post #21 of 28

Offtopic, but pertinent to readability of headlines:

 

This has been bugging me for 2 weeks now.

 

 

 

Can someone check the document processing structure to see if there is an open tag or a missing semicolon on a class or id attribute?

post #22 of 28

Looks like the fandroids have hijacked yet another AI forum thread. This is getting monotonous. I hope they get laid soon, then maybe their egos will be satisfied enough to forget about trolling Apple forums. Sad, pathetic people you are.

 

Maybe they should go "bump" something with one another.

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You make be able to make a case where you want to create a connection to transfer stuff to some anonymous person like some 70's key party but I can't think of s a single time where I wanted to do that. Anonymity means I don't transfer anything with you. Zip, zero, zilch. If we're gonna touch phones you can damn well bet we know each other.

 

A bit paranoid, but okay.  Each to their own.  I live on a side road near a park, where people often get lost and ask for directions.   It's easier for me to beam them a map than to explain it.

 

By anonymous, I also don't necessarily mean strangers.  I believe I even mentioned "new friends".   A good example was over Christmas when my wife invited a dozen cousins who drove up to a hundred miles to come.  We rented a party room at the lake and had a good time.  Anyway, some had Android phones and we exchanged photos and contacts without first having to type in a new email address or other id.  Very handy.

 

The party had to break up early because of the blizzard that stormed through, and in a matter of minutes, two of the three routes from our little town to main highways were cut off.   Instead of having to explain how to get out the final (and unknown to the cousins) way, I was able to instantly give Google Navigation directions to them.   Without even knowing their email address.

 

All of this, btw, has nothing to do with the thread title.  Someone else hijacked it.   In a while, I'll post details of this trial for anyone who's interested.

post #24 of 28
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post
A bit paranoid, but okay.  Each to their own.  I live on a side road near a park, where people often get lost and ask for directions.   It's easier for me to beam them a map than to explain it.

 

If you can "beam it", they're already not lost, because they have a similar phone with its own maps and GPS.

 

1+1 is equalling 17 here.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I will freely admit Samsung did not copy from Apple the ability to transfer files by touching two phones together. Not surprisingly, no one has ever done that other than the people in the commercial.

 

Bump, which was the one billionth download from the App store, so yes Samsung did copy that functionality using a different method.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

If you can "beam it", they're already not lost, because they have a similar phone with its own maps and GPS.

 

1+1 is equalling 17 here.

 

It's so hard to open the navigation App of your choice and hit "home" in your saved locations.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

If you can "beam it", they're already not lost, because they have a similar phone with its own maps and GPS.

 

That doesn't help.  We live in the hills near Skylands Manor, which is a mansion / park that people come from several states to hike in.   However, there are two entrances, one main and one hidden near us.   Sometimes only one is open, and GPS's direct people to the other one and they get lost trying to find the second entrance ... which is nowhere near the first one.  

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

It's so hard to open the navigation App of your choice and hit "home" in your saved locations.

 

Yep, hitting home is easy.  The trouble was, everyone lived south of us, and the only road open was through New York state north of us, via a roundabout trip where it's easy to get confused and end up on an interstate with no exits for thirty miles.   So Home directions were useless, as they first needed to know how to get out the wrong direction to a town I could enter that would put them on the right track to go south again.

 

And we're still off topic.  Maybe nobody cares about this lawsuit since it's not getting big headlines.

post #28 of 28
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post
Sometimes only one is open, and GPS's direct people to the other one and they get lost trying to find the second entrance … which is nowhere near the first one.

 

Could have sworn Google's maps were infallible¡ Or at least had multiple routes¡

 

Of course it helps. They have the map. They can easily see how to leave.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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