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Prank places 'Bad Monkey,' other fake road names in Apple Maps

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
Irreverent and fallacious names for some of Kabul's main streets appear to have made their way into Apple's Maps app, leading some iOS users to find roads such as "Bad Monkey" and "Hillbilly Hameed" when navigating the Afghan capital.

Maps


"Mojo Way" and other bogus road names were discovered by Yaroslav Trofimov, Kabul bureau chief for The Wall Street Journal, who tweeted his findings under the hashtag #TooGoodToBeTrue.

The strangely named roads appear to stem from OpenStreetMap data, added by Afghan university students several years ago as a prank or as a means to give temporary names to roads under dispute. Since dropping Google's mapping solution with the release of iOS 6, Apple has relied upon data from OpenStreetMap ? a user-editable mapping service ? as well as other map services to build its maps app.

Speaking with UN Dispatch, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team director Kate Chapman explained that the error likely stems from Apple taking "an old snapshot of the OpenStreetMap data and [not updating] it since, so things like 'personal' street names are in there, even if they have been fixed since."

Apple's Maps app was a blemish on what was otherwise a well-received new build of iOS. Many users around the world were vocal in complaining about the new Maps app's shortcomings, especially in comparison to the Google Maps app it replaced.

Apple quickly apologized over the mapping mishap, promising to improve the service and even letting go of personnel over the imbroglio. The company has since built a Maps-specific team to address the problem.
post #2 of 39

'Fallacious'?1rolleyes.gif

 

Or just 'false'?

post #3 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

'Fallacious'?1rolleyes.gif

 

Or just 'false'?

 

"Fallacious" carries with it the meaning of not just "false" but the intent to deceive someone. The information on the maps was not just incorrect (false) but was intentionally put there. So yes, "fallacious" is a fitting word.

post #4 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjer View Post

"Fallacious" carries with it the meaning of not just "false" but the intent to deceive someone. The information on the maps was not just incorrect (false) but was intentionally put there. So yes, "fallacious" is a fitting word.


fallacious "based on a mistaken belief"

false " not according with truth or fact; incorrect"
" appearing to be the thing denoted; deliberately made or meant to deceive"

fraudulent might apply to whoever applied the names.
post #5 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjer View Post

"Fallacious" carries with it the meaning of not just "false" but the intent to deceive someone. The information on the maps was not just incorrect (false) but was intentionally put there. So yes, "fallacious" is a fitting word.

I've never heard it used that way. My understanding of the term is a mistaken belief usually presented as poor logic as with a fallacious argument. Perhaps you are conflating the word fictitious with fallacious.

edit: Pipped by JeffDM but I wonder if fraudulent is the most apt as I think it could be argued that without a crime being committed it might come across as too harsh.

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post #6 of 39

You can't depend on on publicly editable data. There will always be some mischievous pranksters, hackers, etc.

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post #7 of 39
At least it's Bad Monkey and not Bad Wolf or Rose might have to deal with an invasion that wants to exterminate all humans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You can't depend on on publicly editable data. There will always be some mischievous pranksters, hackers, etc.

Wikipedia says you're wrong. 1biggrin.gif
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/17/13 at 1:14pm

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #8 of 39

Gosh, I thought it might be used to describe a former girlfriends talent. I thought of her as fallacious. She certainly seemed to enjoy what she did too.

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post #9 of 39
So funny how anytime someone writes an article about Apple maps they have to add the obligatory blemish to Apple statement. Even when the subject has nothing to do with that at all. Lazy people just making another paragraph for their 'story'. Such a blemish they only sold over 50 million iPhones in Q4.

I've had issues with Maps, Google Maps and my Tom Tom with incorrect information. The way I handle it is to send feedback to all them so they can fix it down the road.I'm not going to cry about it or drive hours out of my way because a map tells me to. Don't be a Belgian woman and drive 900 miles out of you way because gps tells you. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/sabine-moreau-gps-belgium-croatia-900-miles_n_2475220.html?ir=Technology
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You can't depend on on publicly editable data. There will always be some mischievous pranksters, hackers, etc.

Wikipedia says you're wrong. 1biggrin.gif

There are really only a handful of actual editors on Wikipedia and also their pages regularly get defaced. The difference is that Wikipedia fixes their pages quickly so hardly anyone know they were hacked. Apple apparently is not as vigilant.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #11 of 39

What a huge disaster. After all, Apple's presence in Afghanistan is huge. Afghanistan is Apple's third largest market, right after the USA and China. I heard that there were at least 750 Taliban waiting outside the main Apple store for the newest iPhone launch. No females were present of course, as they are forbidden from owning iPhones. iTunes match is also not available, as anybody listening to music will obviously be flogged to death.

 

The article states that the street names were under dispute, so they should straighten out their own street names first, that is their problem, not Apple's.

 

And seriously speaking, fixing any street names in Afghanistan for Apple's maps should be extremely low on Apple's priority list, as there are many more relevant and more important countries for Apple, which have plenty of more Apple users than what can be found in Afghanistan. Apple should fix minor issues with Apple maps in civilized countries first, before worrying about Afghanistan and other places like it, where Apple's presence is virtually non-existent.

 

I also heard that 4 people and two penguins using Apple's maps in Antarctica have been having issues with Apple maps, and Apple needs to get on top of this right away. 


Edited by Apple ][ - 1/17/13 at 1:02pm
post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dookie Howsre View Post
I've had issues with Maps, Google Maps and my Tom Tom with incorrect information. The way I handle it is to send feedback to all them so they can fix it down the road.I'm not going to cry about it or drive hours out of my way because a map tells me to. Don't be a Belgian woman and drive 900 miles out of you way because gps tells you. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/sabine-moreau-gps-belgium-croatia-900-miles_n_2475220.html?ir=Technology

Last Friday I took a moment to tap the "show incorrect location"  tab on Google Maps to report our companies inaccurate location according to their data. It wasn't off by much but still put customers at a neighbors business rather than ours. This morning around 8:30 a Google rep called to confirm our business information and to correct the location error shown on Google Maps, referencing the satellite layer over the map display.  Looking at it just now it's already been corrected. 

 

I had reported the incorrect street addressing to Nokia/Navteq at least twice in the past 4 years, and reported the map error to Tomtom (TeleAtlas) at least once in the last two years. Neither of them have corrected the map yet, tho both are slooowly getting closer to accurately numbering the area over the last half-dozen map updates. Google put the fix in place within days of the initial error reporting.

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post #13 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dookie Howsre View Post

So funny how anytime someone writes an article about Apple maps they have to add the obligatory blemish to Apple statement. Even when the subject has nothing to do with that at all. Lazy people just making another paragraph for their 'story'. Such a blemish they only sold over 50 million iPhones in Q4.

I've had issues with Maps, Google Maps and my Tom Tom with incorrect information. The way I handle it is to send feedback to all them so they can fix it down the road.I'm not going to cry about it or drive hours out of my way because a map tells me to. Don't be a Belgian woman and drive 900 miles out of you way because gps tells you. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/sabine-moreau-gps-belgium-croatia-900-miles_n_2475220.html?ir=Technology
I just watched the guys from Dunder Miflin yesterday where the GPS told Mike & Dwight to turn right into the lake and they almost drowned. Lol. To much. It reminds me of the down under people that drove for miles out of the way and almost died.
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Apple should fix minor issues with Apple maps in civilized countries first

Only fix minor issueslol.gif, of course in your opinion there are are no major issues I'm sure.

 

Much of the civilized world does not have street names or numerical addresses. Apple maps is still a disaster in many parts of the civilized world. I prefer Google maps. Funny thing, I just bought some property in Central America which only has a description of 720 meters east from a particular landmark as its legal description although Google for some reason has a full ten word name for the street, most of which doesn't even exist yet, only proposed and no one living there has ever heard of that street name. Not surprisingly Apple maps can't even find the city let alone the street. In my opinion any street more than a year old with asphalt surface and public utility provided street lights should at least show up on the map even if it doesn't have a name. Apple is a total fail at maps in many of the places I visit often.

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post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Gosh, I thought it might be used to describe a former girlfriends talent. I thought of her as fallacious. She certainly seemed to enjoy what she did too.

That would be fellatious presumably, unless you mean she was really a man in which case fallacious is more appropriate but then it depends on what he did to you because we might be back to fellatious again. I'm not sure why grammar and spelling becomes the focus of article threads. Maybe the subject matter isn't very interesting at times.

I'm surprised 'fallacious' was the focus and not the use of 'imbroglio' - don't hear that too often in conversation.
Quote:
Since dropping Google's mapping solution with the release of iOS 6, Apple has relied upon data from OpenStreetMap a user-editable mapping service as well as other map services to build its maps app.

How hard can it possibly be to cross-reference the data? Surely they can automate running grids of data against Google Maps or some other mapping solution and flag up mismatches between names. There's maybe 150 million square km grids. Just do it once to check the data and then every time new information gets appended, flag it for verification. If they see a name like Furry Crevasse, they can have someone look into it.
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Only fix minor issues:lol: , of course in your opinion there are are no major issues I'm sure.

Much of the civilized world does not have street names or numerical addresses. Apple maps is still a disaster in many parts of the civilized world. I prefer Google maps. Funny thing, I just bought some property in Central America which only has a description of 720 meters east from a particular landmark as its legal description although Google for some reason has a full ten word name for the street, most of which doesn't even exist yet, only proposed and no one living there has ever heard of that street name. Not surprisingly Apple maps can't even find the city let alone the street. In my opinion any street more than a year old with asphalt surface and public utility provided street lights should at least show up on the map even if it doesn't have a name. Apple is a total fail at maps in many of the places I visit often.

I find this to be true as well and I still have a hard time getting accurate directions from Apple Maps.

I haven't downloaded the Google app though. I usually just have to find my way around after Apple Maps leads me astray. I guess it's helped my sense of direction and navigation skills. 1biggrin.gif
post #17 of 39
I thought we all accepted that maps had... issues... and that this had died a death and was an unspeakable topic until Apple eventually have finished fixing it over the next 5 years.
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by realwarder View Post

I thought we all accepted that maps had... issues... and that this had died a death and was an unspeakable topic until Apple eventually have finished fixing it over the next 5 years.

The maps issue won't die until Apple allows users the option to choose their default maps app versus Apple's being the automatic default.

But Apple will never do that so the Maps issue will likely always be a thorn.

Later this year when reviewers get their hands on the all new iPhone they'll probably say something like "This iPhone is a great step forward for Apple but it comes standard with their faulty Maps app. Buyers beware."
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

There are really only a handful of actual editors on Wikipedia and also their pages regularly get defaced. The difference is that Wikipedia fixes their pages quickly so hardly anyone know they were hacked. Apple apparently is not as vigilant.

What do you mean by that? Most Wikipages aren't locked in any way so anyone that corrects spelling or punctuation even once is editing. There is a stat that says 60% of those that edit once never so so again. I have thousands upon thousands of edits and contributions on Wikipedia. Some are new pages but most are just minor corrections or additions when I come across some erroneous data. What WIkipedia has few of is employees. Actual paid employees that receive a paycheck for their services. They appear to have hundreds of what appear to be unpaid site Admins and their own stats list 10 million edits happening about every 1.5 to 2 months.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

The maps issue won't die until Apple allows users the option to choose their default maps app versus Apple's being the automatic default.

But Apple will never do that so the Maps issue will likely always be a thorn.

Later this year when reviewers get their hands on the all new iPhone they'll probably say something like "This iPhone is a great step forward for Apple but it comes standard with their faulty Maps app. Buyers beware."

The issue won't die if there is even one address another mapping software can find better than Apple Maps.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dookie Howsre View Post

So funny how anytime someone writes an article about Apple maps they have to add the obligatory blemish to Apple statement. Even when the subject has nothing to do with that at all. Lazy people just making another paragraph for their 'story'. Such a blemish they only sold over 50 million iPhones in Q4.

I've had issues with Maps, Google Maps and my Tom Tom with incorrect information. The way I handle it is to send feedback to all them so they can fix it down the road.I'm not going to cry about it or drive hours out of my way because a map tells me to. Don't be a Belgian woman and drive 900 miles out of you way because gps tells you. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/sabine-moreau-gps-belgium-croatia-900-miles_n_2475220.html?ir=Technology

Wow. That's amazing. And they let her keep her driver's license?

Of course, it would only make front page news if she were using Apple Maps. Since she was using something else, it's not important.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #22 of 39
This fiasco is worse than anything Apple has EVER gone through before, and will spell its end.*

*version 6.43
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Last Friday I took a moment to tap the "show incorrect location"  tab on Google Maps to report our companies inaccurate location according to their data. It wasn't off by much but still put customers at a neighbors business rather than ours. This morning around 8:30 a Google rep called to confirm our business information and to correct the location error shown on Google Maps, referencing the satellite layer over the map display.  Looking at it just now it's already been corrected. 
.

I'll see your tale with another one. Actually about ten. All bad info, all reported several times over the past 3-4 years. All still wrong. Thanks goggle

The only reason things are getting fixed quickly now is because of the crap talk Apple is getting over errors. google stepped up their game when they really didn't care so much before to use it as a hype point

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

This fiasco is worse than anything Apple has EVER gone through before, and will spell its end.*

*version 6.43

If we're only at Apple is Doomed™ version number 6.43 we must have exhausted the numbers zero through infinity and started over again.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You can't depend on on publicly editable data. There will always be some mischievous pranksters, hackers, etc.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Wikipedia says you're wrong. 1biggrin.gif

 

You may find this graphical representation of the Wikipedia page edits on the topic of abortion interesting.

 

 

Vertical axis is article length in words. Horizontal axis is time. Colour bands are individual contributors.

 

Black vertical lines indicate times when the entire article was deleted and replaced with a short, abusive message. The zig zag section to the right indicates an argument where content was repeatedly posted and removed.

post #26 of 39

I'm in Brisbane Australia. Only about 2 million or so of us in this corner of the world, but we are Australia so fairly advanced. Mapping data has to be available.....

 

When I look at South East Queensland, Apple maps is a shambles. Forget bogus street names, it shows bogus towns. And doesn't label real towns. 

post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunks View Post

 

 

 

You may find this graphical representation of the Wikipedia page edits on the topic of abortion interesting.

 

 

Vertical axis is article length in words. Horizontal axis is time. Colour bands are individual contributors.

 

Black vertical lines indicate times when the entire article was deleted and replaced with a short, abusive message. The zig zag section to the right indicates an argument where content was repeatedly posted and removed.

 

 

Yes, there is ALWAYS potential for abuse or mistakes;  whether it's a bad employee, a hacker, or a prankster (like on Wikipedia or OpenStreetMaps).  

 

Wikipedia has proven to be at least as, if not more than, accurate than leading commercial encyclopedias and text books.  I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if OpenStreetMaps contains no more or less errors as Google, Apple, Nokia, or others.

 

The difference is that at least with the "open" sites, mistakes are also in the open and can potentially be fixed sooner.

post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Last Friday I took a moment to tap the "show incorrect location"  tab on Google Maps to report our companies inaccurate location according to their data. It wasn't off by much but still put customers at a neighbors business rather than ours. This morning around 8:30 a Google rep called to confirm our business information and to correct the location error shown on Google Maps, referencing the satellite layer over the map display.  Looking at it just now it's already been corrected. 

 

I had reported the incorrect street addressing to Nokia/Navteq at least twice in the past 4 years, and reported the map error to Tomtom (TeleAtlas) at least once in the last two years. Neither of them have corrected the map yet, tho both are slooowly getting closer to accurately numbering the area over the last half-dozen map updates. Google put the fix in place within days of the initial error reporting.

 

 

Lucky you, but it is a new development. Google is upping its game as it is being threatened on a few fronts, including maps. A draw back I think Apple will need to eventually correct, is it isn't personally able to correct data, as corrections are largely done by Tom Tom. 

post #29 of 39
"The company has since built a Maps-specific team to address the problem."

I'm thinking they should have built a Maps-specific team first... just saying.
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

[...]

 

I also heard that 4 people and two penguins using Apple's maps in Antarctica have been having issues with Apple maps, and Apple needs to get on top of this right away. 

 

The penguins are just holding it wrong.

Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Speaking with UN Dispatch, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team director Kate Chapman explained that the error likely stems from Apple taking "an old snapshot of the OpenStreetMap data and [not updating] it since, so things like 'personal' street names are in there, even if they have been fixed since."

I found this alarming. Why the hell Apple don't use the most up-to-date data?
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

 

Lucky you, but it is a new development. Google is upping its game as it is being threatened on a few fronts, including maps. A draw back I think Apple will need to eventually correct, is it isn't personally able to correct data, as corrections are largely done by Tom Tom. 

It might be that Apple has prompted a better effort on Google's part in fast-tracking map corrections. Thanks Apple if that's the case. We're now showing up in exactly the right spot on at least one major map, Google's, but still off by nearly a quarter mile on Tomtom maps and several hundred feet on Navteq. I wonder what would prompt those two to be more proactive when users report map errors?

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post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


I'm surprised 'fallacious' was the focus and not the use of 'imbroglio' - don't hear that too often in conversation.

 

I miss Natalie Imbroglio.  Her song gets stuck in my head every so often.

post #34 of 39
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post
The maps issue won't die until Apple allows users the option to choose their default maps app versus Apple's being the automatic default.

But Apple will never do that so the Maps issue will likely always be a thorn.

 

I wonder why there wasn't an issue with Google Maps being the default for five years. Why didn't we hear any complaints from people who demanded Apple to give them the option of having Yahoo! Maps as default? 

 

It's probably because there are no valid complaints in this regard and it's just Google's paid (and otherwise) entourage drumming up false conditions.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

It's probably because there are no valid complaints in this regard and it's just Google's paid (and otherwise) entourage drumming up false conditions.

Yup. It's pretty typical Apple-bashing from the those damn Google shills like David Pogue, Siegler, Gruber. . .1wink.gif

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post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You can't depend on on publicly editable data. There will always be some mischievous pranksters, hackers, etc.


You can't rely on any data, then, not checked by yourself. This is quite close to solipsism, where the only thing known in existence is yourself.

 

 

A givernment or company database might have been hacked or a mischievious prankster might have introduced some fake data, some stagiaire long gone maybe. Doesn't happen? Never would a naked picture find its way in Bernard and Bianca, nor a satellite dish in The Hunchback of Notre Dame...

 

Publicly editable data (with public histories and linked sources) is probably more reliable than "black box" privately edited data.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I wonder why there wasn't an issue with Google Maps being the default for five years. Why didn't we hear any complaints from people who demanded Apple to give them the option of having Yahoo! Maps as default? 

 

It's probably because there are no valid complaints in this regard and it's just Apple Maps being too low quality to be a default mapping system.

Here, fixed your logic for you.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunks View Post

 

 

 

You may find this graphical representation of the Wikipedia page edits on the topic of abortion interesting.

 

 

Vertical axis is article length in words. Horizontal axis is time. Colour bands are individual contributors.

 

Black vertical lines indicate times when the entire article was deleted and replaced with a short, abusive message. The zig zag section to the right indicates an argument where content was repeatedly posted and removed.

I think this precisely proves the point: having a public history of the data is essential.

If you find a short, abusive message, you'll be inclined to check what happened (and probably restore the correct contents).

It also makes the point for the importance of checking the sources.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #39 of 39
Parallel Kingdom at one time relied on OpenStreetMap or another user-editable map database. Unfortunately, players began adding fake communities to the system so they could create cities in out of the way locations. They moved away from the database because of this.
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