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Apple celebrates nearly three decades of Macintosh

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Thursday marks exactly 29 years to the day since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs unveiled the first Macintosh ? a computer that would forever change the world of computing.



Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook acknowledged the anniversary in his company's quarterly earnings call on Wednesday. The CEO took the opportunity to make opening remarks in which he marked the nearly three decades since the Macintosh "revolution" began.

"On January 24, 1984, Steve introduced the first Macintosh right here at a shareholder meeting in Cupertino," Cook said. "On the evening news that night, they said it was supposed to be one of the easiest computers to use, and thanks to the new mouse, you hardly had to touch the keyboard.

"We've come a long way since 1984, but we rely on the same spirit and drive that brought the original Mac and other revolutionary products like the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad into the world."

The now-iconic presentation from company co-founder Steve Jobs given in 1984 featured the Macintosh 128K cloaked within a bag, adding an element of mystery to the proceedings. Jobs then removed the Macintosh and its accompanying mouse from the bag, and pulled a 3.5-inch floppy disk from the inside of his jacket pocket to boot the machine, drawing laughs and applause from the audience.

Upon starting, the Macintosh began to play the theme song from "Chariots of Fire" and scrolled the word "MACINTOSH" across the screen. The demonstration also had Jobs's signature phrase, "insanely great," written out in cursive on the Macintosh display.

Other features demonstrated showed word processing, fonts, graphics editing, a calculator, and a chess game. But the biggest surprise came at the end of the presentation.

"Now we've done a lot of talking about Macintosh recently, but today, for the first time ever, I'd like to let Macintosh speak for itself," Jobs said before the computer's text-to-speech functionality was showcased.

"Hello, I'm Macintosh. It sure is great to get out of that bag," the machine read aloud, drawing huge cheers from those in attendance at the shareholder meeting.

Macintosh


The presentation also featured a jab at IBM, the company that was then Apple's chief rival, as the Macintosh told the audience to "never trust a computer you can't lift!"

Now, almost 30 years later, Apple's current CEO vowed that his company is still focused on making the best possible products for consumers. Cook said on Wednesday that the most important thing to Apple is that customers love the products the company makes.

"Everyone at Apple has their eyes on the future ? a future driven by the incredible hard work and dedication of the most talented and creative team on earth," he said, "who all share a common purpose of continuing to create the world's best products, and in doing so enrich the lives of our customers."
post #2 of 42
You mean 29 years...haha...it's twenty-nine years since Jan. '84!

EDIT: I see it's corrected now, it's not 30 years (yet)!!
post #3 of 42

Three decades?  0 is 1 and 1 is 2.  By mac computing standards its 31 years.  LOL.

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post #4 of 42
I wouldn't mind seeing a 30th Anniversary Mac...but not at $7,499 even if delivered in a limo.
post #5 of 42
Years later during a shareholder meeting Steve was asked if there was anything he didn't like about his job. "Shareholder meetings"
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post #6 of 42

"The Macintosh uses an experimental pointing device called a 'mouse.' There is no evidence that people want to use these things. What businessman knows about point sizes on typefaces or the value of variable point sizes ? Who out there in the general marketplace even knows what a 'font' is ?


The whole concept and attitude towards icons and hieroglyphs is actually counterrevolutionary — it's a language that is hardly 'user friendly'. This type of machine was developed by hardware hackers working out of Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center. It has yet to find popular success. There seems to be some mysterious user resistance to this type of machine."    

 

 

— John C. Dvorak on why the Macintosh would fail, San Francisco Examiner, 1984/02/19.

 

 

 

"There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home."    — Ken Olson, president/founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977.


Edited by umrk_lab - 1/24/13 at 9:42am
post #7 of 42
Dvorak. Making useless pointless stupid comment longer than I had realised.

What a tool.

His only use is to give hope to the brain dead that they can succeed in this world.
post #8 of 42
At that time I was given a glass mouse on a wooden stand along with my first order of a Mac from Apple HQ, then in Hemel Hempstead. I just found it in a box this weekend, cleaned it and put it on a sideboard without realizing the significance of the timing ... (cue music from the Twilight Zone).
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post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sedicivalvole View Post

Dvorak. Making useless pointless stupid comment longer than I had realised.

What a tool.

His only use is to give hope to the brain dead that they can succeed in this world.

Strange fella, this Dvorak person. Also looks like some animated character from a movie I've seen...
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http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2358684,00.asp
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post #10 of 42

Why did they make them with such ugly color plastic? 

 

Funny thing is if you took it apart, you would see that even back then it used a Samsung display.

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post #11 of 42
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
Why did they make them with such ugly color plastic? 

 

Everyone made beige boxes back then. It was the "Ford-esque favorite color" of the time.

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post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Strange fella, this Dvorak person.

 

It does never cease to amaze how little understanding so many people who are paid to write about technology actually have of it. Dvorak being an obvious, and not atypical, example. 

post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by mstone View Post
Why did they make them with such ugly color plastic? 

 

Everyone made beige boxes back then. It was the "Ford-esque favorite color" of the time.

I think they changed it to the standard lighter beige color around the SE model. This color reminds me of baby poop.

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post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Years later during a shareholder meeting Steve was asked if there was anything he didn't like about his job. "Shareholder meetings"

I believe the appropriate response is: oh, snap!

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

It does never cease to amaze how little understanding so many people who are paid to write about technology actually have of it. Dvorak being an obvious, and not atypical, example. 

Why does this from Wikipedia cracks me up?
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He started his career as a wine writer and has been wining ever since.
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post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Everyone made beige boxes back then. It was the "Ford-esque favorite color" of the time.

 

I think it was initially HP's influence.  They had wonderful desktop calculators and computers.

 

That's also where Jobs (and everyone else) got the idea for all-in-one boxes, like was used for the Apple II.

 

 

post #17 of 42
Three decades of highly configurable and upgradable Macs that Tim Cook completely ruined with this last iMac update¡

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post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Three decades of highly configurable and upgradable Macs that Tim Cook completely ruined with this last iMac update¡

Even back then you needed special tools to open the machine. Mac Cracker kit. You could upgrade the ram to 4 MB if you had an extra $6,000 to spare

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post #19 of 42
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Even back then you needed special tools to open the machine. Mac Cracker kit. You could upgrade the ram to 4 MB if you had an extra $6,000 to spare

 

My first Apple product was the 128K Mac. When the Mac Plus came out with 1 Meg it seemed like a ton of memory: Eight times the first Mac's memory. I don't think you could put 4 Mb in a Mac until the Mac II. Then it cost me $880 for the RAM and I didn't buy the RAM from Apple where it cost a lot more.

 

What I remember most about the original Mac was all the fonts! Most Mac owner's MacWrite output looked a lot like a ransom note due to the overuse of font types. It was just nearly impossible NOT to resist the temptation to use multiple fonts. The other thing I remember was listening to the single 400K drive swapping out bits of program with the RAM to get anything done... Reeer, reeer, Reeer, reeer, Reeer, reeer... It was a much more patient world back then.

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post #20 of 42

Anyone happen to have a link to a non-YouTube version of this clip? Living in Germany, I'm not allowed to view it on YouTube because of the music it contains. 1frown.gif

post #21 of 42
@ philboogie re: Dvorak: "It has yet to find popular success. There seems to be some mysterious user resistance to this type of machine."

That could be a direct quote from an internal Microsoft memo. On the subject of their entire decade of "moderate" Windows tablet sales. Except, of course, that in Microsoft's case, the quote would be correct. In Dvorak's case, not so much.

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post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

@ philboogie re: Dvorak: "It has yet to find popular success. There seems to be some mysterious user resistance to this type of machine."

That could be a direct quote from an internal Microsoft memo. On the subject of their entire decade of "moderate" Windows tablet sales. Except, of course, that in Microsoft's case, the quote would be correct. In Dvorak's case, not so much.

Fortunately, I only associate Dvorak with something positive:
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post #23 of 42

A Commodore 64 is the computer that changed my world. But I did like my IIsi when it came along...

post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Three decades of highly configurable and upgradable Macs that Tim Cook completely ruined with this last iMac update¡

OWC have kits to upgrade every Mac out there now, fear not. 1smile.gif
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post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WardC View Post

You mean 29 years...haha...it's twenty-nine years since Jan. '84!

EDIT: I see it's corrected now, it's not 30 years (yet)!!

Yep. I can confirm, since the original Macintosh and I share exactly the same birthday.
post #26 of 42
The computer that all micro computers are based off of.
post #27 of 42
What are they celebrating? That they trashed a unique computer company turning it into an appliance business investors no longer believe in?
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I think they changed it to the standard lighter beige color around the SE model. This color reminds me of baby poop.

 

The SE was "platinum".  A more silver-grey color. 

 

The original Mac and Mac 512 were the same color as the Apple II cases.  Maybe slightly darker.  The Apple IIc was the first Apple computer in silly white kitchen appliance white plastic.

 

I will have to see if my original Mac will still boot after 29 years.  It has been a few years since I have taken it out of the official Apple carrying case

 

And thanks to Steve and the Mac team for leading the way for all those non-believers and copiers that came along behind them.  If Apple had not created the Mac, Dvorak would have never had Windows to write about.

post #29 of 42
Originally Posted by ecs View Post
What are they celebrating? That they trashed a unique computer company turning it into an appliance business investors no longer believe in?

 

Thanks for destroying any credibility you might have otherwise had.

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Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

OWC have kits to upgrade every Mac out there now, fear not. 1smile.gif

Actually, once I get word that my iMac has shipped I'll be buying 32GB of RAM for it, but from Newegg, not OWC. OWC's iMac RAM has a higher latency than the RAM I'm buying from Newegg.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #31 of 42

ok, Apple pull your finger out of your iButt and release a new Mac Pro as an anniversary model. While you're at it, make it AFFORDABLE, or at least bundle it with final cut pro or something useful !

 

Well overdue....!!

post #32 of 42
@Peter:

They won't have to make it 'affordable' (whatever that might mean) as everyone has been waiting long enough; they can make it 10k by now. Which is actually a good idea; that way we'd have way less whiners over the Mac Pro.
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post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

I think it was initially HP's influence.  They had wonderful desktop calculators and computers.

 

That's also where Jobs (and everyone else) got the idea for all-in-one boxes, like was used for the Apple II.

 

 

 

 

 

Somewhere in 1972, I programmed a civil engineering code on  a HP98xx machine (see below). Wonderful for the time being : niece basic , program stored on small tape cassettes. The machine was far ahead of its time ....

 

 

 

 

post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by umrk_lab View Post

Somewhere in 1972, I programmed a civil engineering code on  a HP98xx machine (see below). Wonderful for the time being : niece basic , program stored on small tape cassettes. The machine was far ahead of its time ....

 

Neat!   Back then, I bought a used HP 9100 programmable desktop calculator with optional printer:

 

 

 

Magnetic Core memory for 16 storage registers or about 200 program steps.   Magnetic card reader to store the programs on.   CRT output of the registers.

 

Original cost with options around $5600, or twice the price of a new car at the time.   I still have it stored in the basement somewhere.

 

Those were the days.  A decade later, we had the HP-41C pocket calculator that just blew it away.  I wasted way too much time playing with that sucker because of its alphanumeric display.

 

Regards.

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Neat!   Back then, I bought a used HP 9100 programmable desktop calculator with optional printer:

 

 

 

Magnetic Core memory for 16 storage registers or about 200 program steps.   Magnetic card reader to store the programs on.   CRT output of the registers.

 

Original cost with options around $5600, or twice the price of a new car at the time.   I still have it stored in the basement somewhere.

 

Those were the days.  A decade later, we had the HP-41C pocket calculator that just blew it away.  I wasted way too much time playing with that sucker because of its alphanumeric display.

 

Regards.

 

 

Yes ... I do not remember all details, this is too far away ... But managing code without punched cards tray was in itself a revolution ....

post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

Three decades?  0 is 1 and 1 is 2.  By mac computing standards its 31 years.  LOL.
Huh? By what computing standards would 0 and 1 be 1 and 2?
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by umrk_lab View Post

Yes ... I do not remember all details, this is too far away ... But managing code without punched cards tray was in itself a revolution ....

 

Oh man.  

 

I spent so much time late at night punching (and repunching) cards, that I actually went to Duke University Surplus one summer, and bargained my way into  getting a beat up old used card punch for about $100 to use at home, instead of having to go into the computing center.  That was a lot of money for a student living on the GI bill, but worth it.

 

Later, being able to use green screen editors was like heaven in comparison.

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Actually, once I get word that my iMac has shipped I'll be buying 32GB of RAM for it, but from Newegg, not OWC. OWC's iMac RAM has a higher latency than the RAM I'm buying from Newegg.

Ok good to know. I use both OWC and NewEgg all the time so I use either name generically really.

So you are going iMac this near to a possible new Mac Pro? I'm waiting to see what it might be before going iMac, not that I am not tempted now.
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post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Ok good to know. I use both OWC and NewEgg all the time so I use either name generically really.

So you are going iMac this near to a possible new Mac Pro? I'm waiting to see what it might be before going iMac, not that I am not tempted now.

Already ordered the iMac. I have no interest in a Mac Pro. That extra performance and configurability means little to what I use it for. Coming from 15 years of using notebooks as my primary machine an iMac is huge upgrade in performance.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #40 of 42
I still have the original Mac from Jan 1984 that I got at Drexel. I wonder if it is worth anymore than nostalgia for me?
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