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Unlocking cellphones without carrier permission will be illegal come Saturday - Page 3

post #81 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Is there operationally any difference between a user unlocked device and a carrier unlocked one? Aside from needing to redo it each software update, that is. If not, it doesn't matter, as the telecoms won't be able to tell.

 

None.  The actual unlocking process is exactly the same whether you bought an unlocked iPhone directly from Apple, had AT&T grant an unlock request, or had a third party (ahem) request the unlock on your behalf:

 

From the iPhone Summary tab in iTunes 11:

1) Backup the iPhone with the "Back Up Now" button in iTunes (or perform an iCloud backup if you aren't in any hurry).

2) "Restore iPhone..." (note: NOT "Restore Backup...") which wipes the phone back to factory settings (and downloads/updates iOS to the current version in the bargain).  At the end of the restore (after the reboot, when iTunes first connects to the now reset iPhone) it should display a "Congratulations, your iPhone has been unlocked." message.  That's all there is to it.

3) Now "Restore Backup..." to bring back all your apps/data/settings, or skip this step to set it up again from scratch.

 

To test the unlock, power off the iPhone, replace the factory AT&T nano SIM card with one from T-Mobile (or cut down a larger Straight Talk, etc. SIM card to fit) and restart on the T-Mobile EDGE or Straight Talk 3G network (should see "T-Mobile", "HOME" etc. in the status bar).

 

If you are dealing with an unlocked AT&T iPhone, you'll still have to work around the APN issue because factory AT&T iPhones don't allow direct APN entries for data, etc. as they have a custom Settings/General/Cellular configuration page with no Cellular Data Network option.  Not a huge deal as websites like unlockit.co.nz can set APN settings automatically, but you won't get MMS without an eventual jailbreak.


Edited by John.B - 1/27/13 at 1:31am

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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post #82 of 95
Originally Posted by John.B View Post
From the iPhone Summary tab in iTunes 11:

1) Backup the iPhone with the "Back Up Now" button in iTunes (or perform an iCloud backup if you aren't in any hurry).

2) "Restore iPhone..." (note: NOT "Restore Backup...") which wipes the phone back to factory settings (and downloads/updates iOS to the current version in the bargain).  At the end of the restore (after the reboot, when iTunes first connects to the now reset iPhone) it should display a "Congratulations, your iPhone has been unlocked." message.  That's all there is to it.

3) Now "Restore Backup..." to bring back all your apps/data/settings, or skip this step to set it up again from scratch.

 

But the so-called "unlock code"; where does that come into play? 


To test the unlock, power off the iPhone, replace the factory AT&T nano SIM card with one from T-Mobile and restart…

 

I've always hot-swapped my SIMs and they've worked fine.

Originally posted by Relic

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Originally posted by Relic

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post #83 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

But the so-called "unlock code"; where does that come into play?

 

I got my brand-new iPhone 5 unlocked late last week from chronicunlock.com.  They just needed the IMEI number -- and $20 from my PayPal account.  It's all done on the back end.  Took about 24 hours to get notified that the phone was unlocked, then about a half hour for the backup/reset/restore process.  Same process as when AT&T unlocked my 3GS.

 

I'd guess the result from this ruling will be that the unlockers will be driven offshore.  That, and the value of my unlocked 3GS -- and eventually my unlocked iPhone 5 -- will go up.  1cool.gif

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

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post #84 of 95

Ass

Quote:

Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

It is all about the phone software being a copyright material. This is why the Copyright Office requested the review and why it is related to the DMCA. Even the text of the ruling says so:

 

"The Register concluded after a review of the statutory factors that an exemption to the prohibition on circumvention of mobile phone computer programs to permit users to unlock “legacy” phones is both warranted and unlikely to harm the market for such programs. At the same time, in light of carriers’ current unlocking policies and the ready availability of new unlocked phones in the marketplace, the record did not support an exemption for newly purchased phones. Looking to precedents in copyright law, the Register recommended that the class designated by the Librarian include a 90-day transitional period to allow unlocking by those who may acquire phones shortly after the new exemption goes into effect."

 

Assuming, for the sake of argument, both of the following are true:

  1. Legacy phones should have an exemption to be unlocked.
  2. Newly purchased phones should not have an exemption to be unlocked.

 

Nothing in this ruling accounts for the fact that "new" phones will become "legacy" phones in short order.

 

Solomon these guys are not.


Edited by John.B - 1/27/13 at 1:03pm

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

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post #85 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

But the so-called "unlock code"; where does that come into play? 

I've always hot-swapped my SIMs and they've worked fine.

Btw the unlocking of 'global' phones on VZW and Sprint are allowed to be unlocked to be used overseas. Those are the 'certain' phones that are exempt.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #86 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Btw the unlocking of 'global' phones on VZW and Sprint are allowed to be unlocked to be used overseas. Those are the 'certain' phones that are exempt.

 

Ironically, Verizon World Phones have often been a better choice for heavy travelers, over choosing a locked AT&T iPhone.

 

You get the CDMA network in the US for geographic coverage, and promptly unlocked GSM for overseas if you're a good customer.

 

Heck, I've heard of people using Verizon world phones on GSM carriers here in the US, although I have no personal experience to confirm that.

post #87 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

I'm waiting to read whether this only refers to phones under contract.

It doesn't. It's all phones. The telecoms have zero additional obligation to unlock for you afterward if they already don't.
Quote:
There are good reasons to jailbreak. It doesn't mean you want to pirate software.

Oh, no, that's not what I meant.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

The question is "if you buy an off-the-shelf-model-from-apple", can you get a subscription with those 450$ off, or do you get ripped off?

You've never been able to get that in the past, so why would they do it now?
Quote:
…it's designed to protect an immoral market lockdown.

Now you're learning something about the state of cell phones for the past… ten years or so! It's terrible.
Quote:
Originally Posted by walletinspector View Post

Why is it that consumers now rarely own anything they purchase?

Because some people in this country think communism actually works. Either they weren't alive for or have idiotically chosen to ignore the events prior to 22 years ago.
"Communism"? WTF?

I'm no supporter of communism, but that was a pretty ignorant statement.

Try corporate rule. Try the American lobbying system, ruled by corporations. Pretty much the opposite of communism.

And funny how there are no locked phones in China. Only in the US.
post #88 of 95
Originally Posted by tonton View Post
"Communism"? WTF? I'm no supporter of communism, but that was a pretty ignorant statement.

 

I was under the impression that communism is when the state is in possession of everything. I was simply going off of that, nothing more.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #89 of 95
Are the telcos the state? Americans already don't understand communism, socialism and capitalism. Don't further aid and abet their ignorance.

I don't mean to cause conflict here. I'm sure you were making a joke. But you've got to admit Americans don't know what socialism is when they call Obama (of all people) a socialist -- when he's further right wing than Reagan.
post #90 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

  Jailbreaking Unlocking
Smartphones Legal Illegal for all future phones
Tablets Illegal Has always been illegal
Thanks for the up to date chart so it is in tablets only, with it the only thing left it will probably come soon
post #91 of 95

The EFF has posted a clarification of what the new rules mean. At least they think this is what they mean1hmm.gif

https://www.eff.org/is-it-illegal-to-unlock-a-phone

 

"First, the good news. The legal shield for jailbreaking and rooting your phone remains up - it'll protect us at least through 2015. The shield for unlocking your phone is down, but carriers probably aren't going to start suing customers en masse, RIAA-style. And the Copyright Office's decision, contrary to what some sensational headlines have said, doesn't necessarily make unlocking illegal...."

 

"...Now, the bad news. While we don’t expect mass lawsuits anytime soon, the threat still looms. More likely, wireless carriers, or even federal prosecutors, will be emboldened to sue not individuals, but rather businesses that unlock and resell phones. If a court rules in favor of the carriers, penalties can be stiff - up to $2,500 per unlocked phone in a civil suit, and $500,000 or five years in prison in a criminal case where the unlocking is done for "commercial advantage." And this could happen even for phones that are no longer under contract. So we're really not free to do as we want with devices that we own.

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post #92 of 95
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

carriers probably aren't going to start suing customers en masse, RIAA-style.

 

They're putting too much faith in the carriers. lol.gif

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #93 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

They're putting too much faith in the carriers. lol.gif

You're right. 

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post #94 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 
  Jailbreaking Unlocking
Smartphones Legal Illegal for all future phones
Tablets Illegal Has always been illegal

 

Thanks for the up to date chart so it is in tablets only, with it the only thing left it will probably come soon

 

The iPad tablet platform has never been SIM-locked.  Are there other tablets with cellular radios that come SIM-locked to a specific carrier?

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply
post #95 of 95
Originally Posted by John.B View Post
The iPad tablet platform has never been SIM-locked.  Are there other tablets with cellular radios that come SIM-locked to a specific carrier?

 

Probably, which is why it's illegal to manually unlock one.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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