or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Akamai: Mobile Safari was dominant mobile browser in Q3 2012, trailed Android's cellular data share
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Akamai: Mobile Safari was dominant mobile browser in Q3 2012, trailed Android's cellular data share

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
In its latest "State of the Internet Report" released on Monday, web content delivery firm Akamai found that Apple's Mobile Safari accounted for about 60 percent of mobile browser usage across its networks, but trailed Android devices connecting to the internet using cellular data.

Mobile Safari


According to Akamai, during the third quarter of 2012 there were more Google Android Webkit browser users accessing content over cellular data networks than those using Apple's Safari. However, by expanding the data to include all networks, not just those designated as "cellular," Safari was shown to have dominated the mobile browser market with slightly more than a 60 percent share. Using this same scope, Android users accounted for about 22 to 23 percent of the total.

It should be noted that the data set, which can be viewed on the new "Akamai IO" analytics site, comes from several hundred "top-tier" sites that delver content through Akamai's services, most of which are U.S.-centric. The resulting information is therefore skewed toward U.S. users.

The findings are consistent with previous Akamai studies that found Android handset owners accounted for the largest percentage of mobile browser requests over cellular, with the Webkit responsible for 37.6 percent of requests. Apple's Mobile Safari was close behind, with a 35.7 percent share. Following the top two browsers were Opera Mini, RIM's BlackBerry-dedicated browser and Microsoft's Mobile Explorer, which accounted for roughly 20 percent, 4.2 percent and 1.5 percent, respectively.

Akamai Cellular
Source: Akamai


Apple's iOS devices once again took to the top spot in overall mobile browser share when considering traffic from all networks, including but not limited to Wi-Fi, and accounted for a 60.1 percent average throughout the quarter ending in September 2012. The Android Webkit generated 23.1 percent of requests, followed by Mobile Explorer's 9.3 percent share. Opera Mini teetered at an average just below 5 percent for the quarter.

Akamai Cellular


Additional data provided Akamai IO (Akamai Internet Observatory) showed that Mobile Safari, Android and Mobile Explorer were consistently responsible for over 5 percent of requests across all Akamai networks for quarter three.
post #2 of 51
So why aren't Android-based devices using WiFI as much?

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #3 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

So why aren't Android-based devices using WiFI as much?
Android-device owners can't afford a wifi-router and high-speed Internet?
post #4 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

Android-device owners can't afford a wifi-router and Internet?

They don't connect to WiFi as easily or seamlessly as iOS?

I can't figure it out. It's such a huge disparity, too.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #5 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

They don't connect to WiFi as easily or seamlessly as iOS?

I can't figure it out. It's such a huge disparity, too.
Finally figured it out. They're all homeless
post #6 of 51

Maybe iOS users are more likely to surf at home using an iPhone or iPad whereas Android people are more likely to hop on a laptop (which makes sense since the iPad is the dominant tablet).

post #7 of 51
If it's mostly US users, and Apple dominates in the US why is this surprising?
post #8 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

Finally figured it out. They're all homeless

The homeless seem to all have smartphones and notebooks these days but they also seem to hang out at coffee shops. Or maybe those are hipsters; I can't tell the difference. 1tongue.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

Maybe iOS users are more likely to surf at home using an iPhone or iPad whereas Android people are more likely to hop on a laptop (which makes sense since the iPad is the dominant tablet).

I think you have hit on it. This is measuring mobile Safari and there are iPod Touches and iPads which make up a huge number of iOS devices. Even the iPads that are sold with cellular might mostly be used on WiFi with cellular being used in rare bursts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkell31 View Post

If it's mostly US users, and Apple dominates in the US why is this surprising?

But wouldn't US cellular and US WiFi still be represented?

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

So why aren't Android-based devices using WiFI as much?

iPad, iPod Touch, and Old iPhones being used as an iPod touch.

post #10 of 51

I think it's as simple as LTE.  Many Android users are still grandfathered into unlimited LTE on Verizon, and LTE is much faster than your average wifi.  Even ignoring the unlimited high-speed data, there are far more LTE Android phones than LTE iPhones, so that means more Android users are likely to prefer cellular data.

post #11 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

I think it's as simple as LTE.  Many Android users are still grandfathered into unlimited LTE on Verizon, and LTE is much faster than your average wifi.  Even ignoring the unlimited high-speed data, there are far more LTE Android phones than LTE iPhones, so that means more Android users are likely to prefer cellular data.

1) How well did LTE Android-based phones sell compared to non-LTE Android-based phones?

2) The iPhone 5 might be the first LTE iPhone but Apple has said previously that the newest iPhone outsells all the previous iPhones combined. Based on total that could still be happening. In either case there are a lot of LTE iPhone out there now.

3) LTE might be faster than a lot of internet connections attached via WiFi but that doesn't mean anything when a webpage takes a handful of seconds of load on either and a webpage takes some time to read or watch. It certainly doesn't account for the difference.

4) If Android phones had WiFi why aren't they being counted in this? AT&T had unlimited as does Sprint today and '3G', at least with AT&T, is often much faster than the internet connection for WiFi and, at least withAT&T, was faster than what Android-based phones with early LTE chips could offer.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #12 of 51
I'd say that many people are using grandfathered unlimited data and don't bother to connect to wifi.

In my small world sample which is mostly iphone users, the early adopters all have grandfathered unlimited plans but many use wifi to AirPlay to a home stereo via Airport Express or AppleTV. I don't know any android users connecting to wifi to stream music or video to DLNA or whatever standard is called, because they have never heard of that standard.

Also, out of the android users I know, only 1 is a tech nerd. The rest had their cable/dsl installer (or friend like me) setup their wifi. They wrote the password down put it in a drawer and haven't thought about it in years.

I guess I'm trying to explain that while android has a huge market share, the majority are not tech nerds, neither are iOS users or the average computer user either. I think using an apple router with iOS alleviated some of this but not all.

Most android users (non tech nerds like us) with unlimited plans have no incentive to connect via wifi. They can't easily do something like AirPlay or stream music or video to their device from iTunes.

Do this make sense?
post #13 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Two stupid comments before ten posts.

He was making a joke. At the expense of Android users but it wasn't hostile and I detect no hostility in his comment. Now if Apple ][ made a joke like that it would probably read quite different.

I think the best method would have come back with a clever retort. How about: "Maybe iPhone users are always on WiFi because they're so accustomed to their protected environment that they are afraid to even leave their house."

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #14 of 51
Hey Folks,

The real reason why Android devices use cellular data more is because Android is flawed. Even if wi-fi is available, Android does not switch to it automatically. People end up paying for cellular data when they shouldn't have to. Users must choose which network to use, cellular or wi-fi.

On the other hand, iOS always favor Wi-Fi if it is available. Cellular data is shut off when Wi-Fi is available. Thank you Apple for keeping our data bill down.
post #15 of 51
@ Spacepower
Non-nerd people would also use the rather ubiquitous and straightforward Bluetooth to stream music.

@ KDMeister
Any source to support your wild allegation? I won't hold my breath.
post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Two stupid comments before ten posts.
It's late, so sue me
post #17 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

He was making a joke. At the expense of Android users but it wasn't hostile and I detect no hostility in his comment. Now if Apple ][ made a joke like that it would probably read quite different.

I think the best method would have come back with a clever retort. How about: "Maybe iPhone users are always on WiFi because they're so accustomed to their protected environment that they are afraid to even leave their house."
I am admittedly curious about this, and my real guess is that Android users use a PC at home as opposed to an ipad at least in first-world countries. Actually in most of the world, a mobile phone is their only computing device. This likely explains the data in developing nations
Edited by ifij775 - 1/28/13 at 10:01pm
post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

Maybe iOS users are more likely to surf at home using an iPhone or iPad whereas Android people are more likely to hop on a laptop (which makes sense since the iPad is the dominant tablet).

Exactly. When Android customers come at home, they would rather use their laptop for a better experience while iOS user are fine with sticking to their mobile devices as they are good enough. 

post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by arch View Post

Exactly. When Android customers come at home, they would rather use their laptop for a better experience while iOS user are fine with sticking to their mobile devices as they are good enough. 

Bingo. I'm at home, I'm actually sitting in front of my work laptop, and yet I'd rather grab my iPhone to do just about everything, including tapping out this message.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


Bingo. I'm at home, I'm actually sitting in front of my work laptop, and yet I'd rather grab my iPhone to do just about everything, including tapping out this message.

I concur. My wife uses her iPhone at home most of the time even though she sat in front of her MBA. She would leave her iPhone only to do a heavy task like MS Word or Excel lol.

post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

So why aren't Android-based devices using WiFI as much?

 

Android owners have jobs and can't spend all their time sitting in Starbucks.

post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDMeister View Post

Hey Folks,

The real reason why Android devices use cellular data more is because Android is flawed. Even if wi-fi is available, Android does not switch to it automatically. People end up paying for cellular data when they shouldn't have to. Users must choose which network to use, cellular or wi-fi.

On the other hand, iOS always favor Wi-Fi if it is available. Cellular data is shut off when Wi-Fi is available. Thank you Apple for keeping our data bill down.

 

Utter bullshit. Android automatically switches to available WiFi networks just like iOS does.

post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

I think it's as simple as LTE.  Many Android users are still grandfathered into unlimited LTE on Verizon, and LTE is much faster than your average wifi.  Even ignoring the unlimited high-speed data, there are far more LTE Android phones than LTE iPhones, so that means more Android users are likely to prefer cellular data.


What wifi networks do you use? All my home and office networks that im mostly living in are all 11n networks (300Mbps) How can you say that LTE is faster than Wifi. Well its faster than some 10 year old wifi would be closer to the truth.

 

wifi and android is a mixed bag atleast in my experience. Ive helped a few frends with problems  and concluded that its faster to use usb cable than to tether via wifi so i guess that the wifi software (drivers) on some phones is not that great. (no there werent any interference on the channel...)

post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post

 

Android owners have jobs and can't spend all their time sitting in Starbucks.


Most android phones are cheap ones. In my experience (from my own observations) is that if you cant afford to buy a decent phone you havent got money to spend on decent  accesspoints, switches, copper/fiber connections (where you live). Many dont even understand that you can pair those if they have an accesspoint.

post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by habi View Post


Most android phones are cheap ones. In my experience (from my own observations) is that if you cant afford to buy a decent phone you havent got money to spend on decent  accesspoints, switches, copper/fiber connections (where you live). Many dont even understand that you can pair those if they have an accesspoint.

I know what you mean as I feel somewhat the same way. If you don't live in an upscale neighborhood like mine, or drive a BMW, Audi or other premium brand you don't deserve my respect either. People like that are either too poor or too uneducated to matter. It's obvious that anyone would choose a lifestyle like you and I have if they could afford to. Everyone knows that.

/s


Edited by Gatorguy - 1/29/13 at 3:59am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDMeister View Post

On the other hand, iOS always favor Wi-Fi if it is available. Cellular data is shut off when Wi-Fi is available. Thank you Apple for keeping our data bill down.

Besides, wifi radio consumes less battery power.

post #27 of 51
Reason: iPad
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

Reason: iPad

I think we have a winner!

post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

They connect to Wifi the same as iOS. I used an HTC EVO when it first came out for a while. I didn't use the internet as much because the browser was painful to use. Even third party browsers like Dolphin HD just plan sucked. Also using Wifi but even more so 4G sucks the life out of the battery.

 

Not sure if it is still that way but certainly why my Android trial was short lived.

 

This has been largely what I've observed with Android users -- i.e., they turn off WiFi because it drains their battery too fast when it's on. Most smartphone users do not actively manage individual radios, so once it's off, it stays off, and they end up doing everything on the cell radio.

 

The difference in cell vs WiFi usage doesn't have any significance beyond that, it's simply an artifact of Android power management.

post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


They don't connect to WiFi as easily or seamlessly as iOS?

I can't figure it out. It's such a huge disparity, too.

It is odd isn't it? Perhaps it's generational? In my teenage son's group I don't recall seeing any iPhones (tho most of them could probably afford a 5 and 4's are free anyway). I haven't asked any of them why no iPhones. But anyway my son was complaining about T-Mo throttling his service the last couple of months for going over his "unlimited plan" 2GB threshold. I asked him why he was using so much data, and whether he used wi-fi when out and about to save on it. Guess what? He doesn't even use wi-fi at home, much less anywhere else! He said turning on wi-fi or gps or bluetooth uses too much battery so he turned them all off. No one he knows uses wi-fi according to him. 

melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllieWallieWhiskers View Post

Reason: iPad

 

This.  It's all about mixing different devices into the results.

 

When comparing phones, the browsing is basically equivalent.  When throwing in mostly WiFi-based devices such tablets, the stats get highly skewed towards iOS for two reasons: 

 

1) The iPad alone has over 50% of total mobile web traffic...over twice the share of any phone, including the iPhone.

 

2) Even if people own two different OS devices (iPad, plus an Android based e-reader such as the Nook and Kindle Fire), they will overwhelmingly choose the iPad for browsing.


Edited by KDarling - 1/29/13 at 5:33am
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post

 

Android owners have jobs and can't spend all their time sitting in Starbucks.

Nah, I think the previous answers about being homeless/can't afford wifi is just about the correct answer.

 

We know from many prior surveys that Androiders are nowhere near as well off as iOS users (too lazy to give you links). They can afford to spend their days at Starbucks. You can't.

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

This.  It's all about mixing different devices into the results.

 

When comparing phones, the browsing is basically equivalent.  When throwing in mostly WiFi-based devices such tablets, the stats get highly skewed towards iOS for two reasons: 

 

1) The iPad alone has over 50% of total mobile web traffic...over twice the share of any phone, including the iPhone.

 

2) Even if people own two different OS devices (iPad, plus an Android based e-reader such as the Nook and Kindle Fire), they will overwhelmingly choose the iPad for browsing.

 

In other words, what KDarling is saying is that the Android tablet market is a dismal failure, and that's his explanation for the disparity.

post #34 of 51
Could also be due to the fact that ATT has wifi in many places.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Nah, I think the previous answers about being homeless/can't afford wifi is just about the correct answer.

 

We know from many prior surveys that Androiders are nowhere near as well off as iOS users (too lazy to give you links). They can afford to spend their days at Starbucks. You can't.

 

post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

In other words, what KDarling is saying is that the Android tablet market is a dismal failure, and that's his explanation for the disparity.

 

I'm pointing out that more people in the USA buy Android e-Readers instead of Android general purpose tablets.  If that's your definition of failure, then sure.

 

Of course, we could leave Android off the chart entirely, and compare only iOS devices... and it would look like the iPhone was also a "failure" in comparison to the iPad.   Everything is relative to the usage being charted.

 

Here, the usage is web browsing in the USA.  For web browsing, larger iPads are definitely preferred over smaller Android based e-readers, and even over iPhones.

 

It'd be interesting to compare iPad Mini browsing to that of its bigger brother iPad.

post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Nah, I think the previous answers about being homeless/can't afford wifi is just about the correct answer.

 

We know from many prior surveys that Androiders are nowhere near as well off as iOS users (too lazy to give you links). They can afford to spend their days at Starbucks. You can't.

 

Actually, iPhone owners are more likely to be in debt than Android or Blackberry owners:

 

http://www.mobiletoday.co.uk/News/11294/iphone_owners_poorer_Blackberry.aspx

 

Nothing sadder than a wannabe fanboy having to use their overdraft to pay for the latest Apple shiny... 

post #38 of 51
Akamai?

No point continuing further. These are the same idiots MacRulez likes to bring up since they are the ONLY study out of several that show Android and iOS close in terms of usage.

They're also the ones who can't even separate out iPhone and iPad traffic and have to resort to making "guesses" about the disparity.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Akamai?

No point continuing further. These are the same idiots MacRulez likes to bring up since they are the ONLY study out of several that show Android and iOS close in terms of usage.

 

While I share your disdain of using limited web or advertising stats to determine actual device usage, especially from companies who are only seeking to sell their wares, Akamai is not the only study to say that phone usage is the same.

 

For example, take that recent Chitika study from December, which was widely quoted on fansites.   From it, most people only saw headlines like "iOS Devices consume twice as much web traffic as Android!".   Few ever took the time to actually read further down in the source material:

 

"While third-party and our own observations have pegged smartphone Web traffic share as a near-tie, Apple has a decided advantage in the tablet market, where its iPad is unquestionably the hottest seller in the sector.  This advantage is the largest contributing factor to Apple’s lead over Android." - Chitika

 

The upshot seems to be that, at least in the USA, mobile web browsing is done two to three times as much on large screened tablets than on phones or e-readers, and there's a lot more large screened iPads in the USA than any other large screened tablet.

 


Edited by KDarling - 1/29/13 at 8:03am
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Akamai?

No point continuing further. These are the same idiots MacRulez likes to bring up since they are the ONLY study out of several that show Android and iOS close in terms of usage.

They're also the ones who can't even separate out iPhone and iPad traffic and have to resort to making "guesses" about the disparity.

No, pretty much every website stat tracking shows the same thing, iOS usage is greater than Android usage, by how much depends on the content. Image/comic sites tend to be consistent with Akamai's numbers, where as sites that cater specifically to Apple fans (eg Appleinsider, Macrumors) versus Linux/Android (Slashdot) tend to skew much more heavily to their intended audiences devices.

See also
http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_mobile.asp iOS >Android
http://www.w3counter.com/globalstats.php iOS>Android
http://www.netmarketshare.com/# iOS>Android

The stats don't lie, but as pointed out, English-language traffic is largely going to reflect this. When you look at Asian language traffic you'll probably see a different set of numbers, particularly with Korea.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Akamai: Mobile Safari was dominant mobile browser in Q3 2012, trailed Android's cellular data share