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Apple's 128GB iPad aims to drive profits up a path competitors can't easily follow

post #1 of 152
Thread Starter 
Apple's surprise unveiling of a new "fat" iPad 4 model equipped with 128 gigabytes of storage expands the company's tablet platform offerings into premium territory, a feat its competitors will have trouble duplicating.

iPad


The introduction of a new high-capacity iPad is significant in several respects. First, Apple appears to have successfully "doubled down" in securing secrecy as its chief executive Tim Cook promised to do last summer. The first inkling of the new fat iPad was first floated over the weekend, just one business day before it was officially announced.

Perhaps more importantly, the surprise announcement also demonstrates how quickly (and unpredictably) Apple can shift direction. Since the introduction of the iPad mini last fall, critics have complained that the smaller form factor iPad didn't deliver an sharp enough screen to attract customers and, at the same time, that widespread adoption of the lower priced model would erode the company's relatively high margins.

It turned out they were at least half right in that contradictory prediction: Apple outlined that its margins could decrease in the coming quarter due to selling a large number of the very popular new lower priced iPad minis.

Barclays


However, the iPad's critics are so preoccupied with the notion that low prices alone can drive sales that they failed to anticipate that Apple could also offer a new, more expensive and higher capacity full sized iPad, or that there could be an audience for it.

If it is successful in selling in meaningful quantities, the larger capacity, higher margin new fat iPad has the potential to disrupt the predicted direction of Apple's margins. The same disruption of pundits' expectations has occured time after time over the last decade as Apple has released alluring new products that have broken the ostensible trend toward cheaper commodity devices.

How big of a development is a 128-gigabyte iPad?


At first glance, Apple's 128-gigabyte iPad doesn't seem like much of an advance. After all, the company's competitors won't have too much difficulty in adding more memory to their own tablets. However, they'll have a very hard time selling such a high end product, particularly at the same price Apple can charge.

Historically, Android licensees have struggled to create competitive tablet products at iPad prices. Even after abandoning profitability, Amazon has had to work hard to beat Apple's prices on the low end; there's no evidence that the company is selling any real volume of its higher end Kindle models. Google's conventional Android licensees have similarly had enough difficulty shipping any low end tablets; larger more expensive models have been DOA.

Microsoft and its Windows licensees have tried to sell higher priced tablet for a decade, but these faced direct competition with those same companies' conventional notebooks and netbooks. Apple is the only PC maker to have any breathing room between its most expensive tablets ($699 to $829) and its cheapest notebooks (which start at $999).

For companies and institutions that are heavily invested in iOS (as many Fortune 500 companies are), paying an extra $100 for double the device's document and app capacity is an easy decision to make. However, switching to an alternative platform and vendor (at any cost) involves a significant barrier.

Going forward, Apple's ability to ship large, consistent volumes of iOS devices will have a powerful impact on its ability to source cost effective components, particularly storage memory. This not only benefits its iOS devices, but also its Mac offerings, nearly all of which have transitioned to solid state memory in some form.

Backed by economies of scale in sourcing storage memory cheaply in high volumes, Apple is returning to its historical trend with iPods in offering more storage than its competitors could at the same price.

As iOS apps grow in size (a trend accelerated by Retina display graphics) alongside media files (similarly abetted by HD videos), consumers will increasingly demand more storage at affordable prices. The more Apple can do to fill up its users' iOS devices, the more demand it will stoke for greater storage capacities, resulting in higher sales volumes of memory and lower component costs.

While its competitors shave down storage capacity to reach impressive entry level prices, Apple appears focused on delivering value-oriented products that are profitable. Storage capacity is one of the most visible, valuable features of a mobile device, and therefore is something users will willing pay more to obtain.

Apple fails to follow the herd


Apple's new 128-gigabyte fat iPad bucks the trend toward cheaper, less powerful tablet and netbooks, the kind of lower end devices that many observers had predicted to rapidly win tablet market share away from Apple's iPad line.

Google's Nexus 7, for example, delivered its breakthrough $250 starting price by only offering 16 gigabytes of storage, which like Apple's iPad line, is not expandable. Amazon's Kindle Fire similarly reaches below $200 by offering 16 gigabytes of storage. Neither company's smaller form factor tablets offer a 64-gigabyte version like Apple's iPad mini.

Because they are competing almost exclusively on price, they can't offer a 64-gigabyte version without pushing their products squarely into the price range of Apple's iPad line. And as the first generation of Android 3.0 Honeycomb tablets aptly demonstrated, there's not really an insatiable demand for tablets in general, and certainly not for non-iPad tablets priced like the iPad.

The number of consumers willing to pay more than $200 for an entertainment device quickly drop off as the price goes up. However, Apple isn't marketing its iPads exclusively toward the budget-minded consumer market that Amazon, Google, Samsung and other tablet makers have targeted.

Apple holds a commanding grasp on the mobile enterprise market with iOS. Those sales, to government and corporate users who are looking for value rather than just a low entry price, are helping Apple to sustain higher end sales of both tablets and smartphones.

Higher end mobile devices are far more profitable. That explains why Samsung earned just half of Apple's profits in the most recent winter quarter despite selling 32 percent more handsets globally.

Put simply, Samsung wasn't selling nearly as many iPhone-class smartphones (or iPad-class tablets) as Apple was. The new 128-gigabyte fat iPad is just a new step in Apple's same direction.

This all happened before


Apple similarly ignored pundits' insistence in 2008 that it had to deliver a cheap Mac netbook or it would be overwhelmed in the sub-notebook market by an avalanche of cheap devices running Windows or perhaps Linux or Android.

Instead, the company continued to perfect its premium MacBook Air line, outfitted with such luxuries as solid state storage, rigid aluminum cases and backlit keyboards. Consumers quickly grew disillusioned with cheap netbooks, forcing the industry to shift its direction in an effort to clone the MacBook Air, as typified by Intel's "Ultrabook" program.

A similar trend occurred in MP3 players; while critics consistently praised cheaper, lower end iPod alternatives (including a Microsoft-led consortium of device makers selling "PlaysForSure" branded MP3 players nearly a decade ago), Apple retained and expanded its audience of customers with increasingly more sophisticated devices sporting new software features, slim designs and increased storage capacities.

As with netbooks, the industry trend toward producing cheap MP3 players collapsed under consumer dissatisfaction, forcing Microsoft to design its own new MP3 products patterned closely after Apple's higher end iPods. Those "Zune" efforts ultimately failed, in part because it is far more difficult to copy an established, sophisticated product selling at a premium profit that sustains its continued development. That is, ironically, a reality that Microsoft has enjoyed the flip side of with its long running Office franchise.

Today, Apple's most popular iPod remains the relatively expensive iPod touch, which has claimed half or more of the company's total iPod sales even as the iPod family has retained a dominant share of around 70 percent or more of the total market for MP3 players.

Predictions that cheap, low end MP3 players, netbooks, phones and now tablets would cause Apple's existing market share and profitability to rapidly collapse have simply been consistently wrong over the past decade. The reason for this is tied to Apple's profitability.

Profits drive market power


Customers in any market prefer lower prices. However, making products cheaper is far more difficult than it might appear. Most efforts to reduce the price of tablets or smartphones or MP3 players or computers have revolved around using slower, heavier and less capable components, resulting in not just a cheaper product, but an obviously less valuable one.

While its competitors seem to be focused on lower entry prices, Apple has focused on apparent value. The factors that contribute toward value are not always simple or straightforward. When Apple started selling iPods, adding more storage memory initially resulted in a more desirable product.

When the iPhone appeared, it packed an iPod-style amount of storage, making it more expensive than most of its smartphone competition. That extra RAM, however, also made it notably more useful, serving as a phone, an iPod and a software platform capable of running a real browser, desktop class email and sophisticated apps and games.

Customers lined up to pay extra for Apple's premium device. Other vendors at the time were making equally (or more) expensive luxury class smartphones. But those devices were selling in very small volumes. Apple made profitable, high end smartphones its only offering even as pundits insisted that the company make a cheap feature phone to match the high volume, low profit sales of its competitors.

While more memory initially contributed toward value, in subsequent iOS generations, Apple ran into a new reality: adding more RAM eventually contributes toward reduced battery life, something that had to be factored against the usefulness of having more memory.

Competing devices, particularly tablets, pack on lots of system RAM to run their generic, broadly licensed operating system software. But this has also had a negative impact on their battery life, and subsequently, product satisfaction and sales. Striking the perfect balance between various design goals is much more difficult than just adding more of everything.

Apple's profits allow it to plot out complex, long term development goals


Memory isn't the only feature separating Apple from other vendors. In seeking to differentiate their offerings, Apple's smartphone competitors have packed on easy to implement technology fads like induction charging or NFC, which contribute very little toward value while driving up costs, complexity and unit size.

Apple's profitability gives it the resources to develop expensive and hard to duplicate hardware features, core software technologies and construction methods that are out of the reach of smaller companies operating under narrower profit margins. Apple's cash pile also gives it the ability to make large scale advance purchases, locking down favorable prices and reliable component supplies.

It can also devote significant resources toward solving challenging technical problems. The reason why Apple can ship iOS devices that are responsive and useful despite having much less system RAM than a conventional PC can be attributed toward long term development of a highly integrated mobile operating system optimized to run with minimal resources.

In stark contrast, almost every major new version of Android has been unable to run on the majority of the existing installed base of devices because each new release has required more resources than the last crop of devices included. Google's Android development focus appears to follow short term goals that constantly shift.

While Google and Apple are both chasing money, Apple is successfully implementing a series of long term strategies while Google appears to be running after new objectives each year, and abandoning most of them just as rapidly.

Microsoft appears to be afflicted with the opposite problem. After spending two years porting Windows 8 to ARM, it released its Surface RT as a desktop/mobile hybrid. The result of investing in this long term development effort was a relatively expensive device with the flaws and complexities of a desktop PC packed into the size constraints of a tablet. Its non optimal operating system also eats up much of its storage, rendering it a severely flawed device.

Microsoft's solution is Surface Pro, an even more expensive, more desktop-like hybrid device with even less of the elements that made the iPad an attractive alternative to conventional PCs. Microsoft expended the same type of long term efforts into producing generations of the Zune, with similar results.

Despite very different paths and results, Google and Microsoft both seem motivated by the same reactive desire to beat Apple and get its revenues in one area after another, rather than orchestrating an original long term plan to develop exceptional products that will result in sustainable profitability. As long as its competitors seek to copy its output rather than its formula for success, it appears Apple has nothing to worry about.
post #2 of 152
That's an awful lot to read into a fairly standard storage bump...
post #3 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

That's an awful lot to read into a fairly standard storage bump...

Agreed.

LOL people should just enjoy whatever phone they prefer and stop being d-bags about other phones they don't use. Fanboys are pathetic, regardless of whether they are Android or Apple ones.
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LOL people should just enjoy whatever phone they prefer and stop being d-bags about other phones they don't use. Fanboys are pathetic, regardless of whether they are Android or Apple ones.
Reply
post #4 of 152
C'mon DED, I'm sure you can pump the stock price by another 2% today, just by linking it to a 128GB storage.
post #5 of 152

Kasper ! You have changed your slave or what ?

post #6 of 152
The iPad is closing the gap with laptops.
post #7 of 152

Fat?

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #8 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

That's an awful lot to read into a fairly standard storage bump...

 

LOL, that's our Daniel. Full blown cult member :D

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #9 of 152

"Apple's ability to ship large, consistent volumes..."

 

That's a large part of how Intel crushed AMD. Though, Apple stumbled some with the latest product introductions. If you have to have ramp-up problems, please do not let them land in a holiday shopping quarter.

post #10 of 152

What does Dilger mean by "fat" iPad?

Is the "fat" referring to the bump in storage or the physical size of the device?

So far, nothing on the Apple Store website showing it as an option.

 

Maybe he means "phat".


Edited by antkm1 - 1/30/13 at 7:05am
post #11 of 152
... as nice as it is to have a 128gb (on-board) storage option (at a rather exorbitant cost), merely increasing capacity does not fundamentally change the functionality of the iPad.

Likely the single biggest obstacle for to having such a large amount of storage on an iPad is that iOS still lacks a user accessible file system, so as to easily acess all of those 'CAD files' etc. one might load on all that new space.

Note: Several competing mobile devices have reached the 128gb storage level already via having 64gb of built-in storage plus (fully OS integrated) 64gb microSDXC/Class 10 cards (often found for around US 50.00) with 128gb microSDXC cards soon to be released.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

The iPad is closing the gap with laptops.

Not Really... at least not until it gets a user accessible file system and the abilty to run apps in individual windows etc.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #12 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

So far, nothing on the Apple Store website showing it as an option.

Goes on sale February 5th.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #13 of 152
Gee, has anyone at AI cared to read this "article"? If the "author" can't, at least someone who edits stuff? Like, you know, an "editor" that speaks and reads the language? This piece is a veritable typo and grammar slip treasure trove. The worst in years, probably.
post #14 of 152

Seriously? DED has written some fairly over-the-top, gushing articles before; but I think this one tops them all. Not because of how extreme it is (although it is that, too), but because the entire thing was based on a simple, benign storage bump. And it's written as if that one tiny, little thing signals some shift by Apple or some great new thing that Apple has done.

 

Congratulations Apple, you have done what your customers have been asking for for at least a few years now. Way to stay ahead of the game. LOL

post #15 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's surprise unveiling of a new "fat" iPad 4 model equipped with 128 gigabytes of storage expands the company's tablet platform offerings into premium territory, a feat its competitors will have trouble duplicating.

 

Yes, indeed. Very hard to sell a tablet with more SD... No way anyone else can pull it off.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
 critics have complained that the smaller form factor iPad didn't deliver an sharp enough screen to attract customers
Critics have actually complained that the smaller form factor iPad doesn't deliver a sharp enough screen, end of story. Adding "to attract consumers" knowing it sold nonetheless is making a baseless point to hide a very real point. Stopped reading there, it's obviously a DED piece.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #16 of 152

How much bigger is the 128gb iPad, as far as I was aware it was the same size as the other models?

 

If so why is it being called fat? I've only seen this nickname here so far. 

 

Colour me confused...

iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
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post #17 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Seriously? DED has written some fairly over-the-top, gushing articles before; but I think this one tops them all. Not because of how extreme it is (although it is that, too), but because the entire thing was based on a simple, benign storage bump. And it's written as if that one tiny, little thing signals some shift by Apple or some great new thing that Apple has done.

 

Congratulations Apple, you have done what your customers have been asking for for at least a few years now. Way to stay ahead of the game. LOL

DED isn't known for his sense of measure... but at least, he doesn't love Microsoft.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #18 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jozsoo View Post

Gee, has anyone at AI cared to read this "article"? If the "author" can't, at least someone who edits stuff? Like, you know, an "editor" that speaks and reads the language? This piece is a veritable typo and grammar slip treasure trove. The worst in years, probably.

Kind of things that happen when you're using your weaker hand to type.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #19 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Note: Several competing mobile devices have reached the 128gb storage level already via having 64gb of built-in storage plus (fully OS integrated) 64gb microSDXC/Class 10 cards (often found for around US 50.00) with 128gb microSDXC cards soon to be released.

 

SD Cards in mobile devices are yucky. Apple not adding an SD Card to the iPad is what people unconsciously love about Apple = restraint, focus, simplicity, elegance. If you don't understand this, then IMO you misunderstand Apple.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #20 of 152
Quote:
At first glance, Apple's 128-gigabyte iPad doesn't seem like much of an advance. After all, the company's competitors won't have too much difficulty in adding more memory to their own tablets. However, they'll have a very hard time selling such a high end product, particularly at the same price Apple can charge.

 

But none of the competitors will try to sell a 128GB tablet at the same price! Ok except the always clueless MSFT, but still...

 

In the end, GOOG or AMAZ can easily sell a 128GB version of their tablets, e.g. NEXUS 10 with 128GB for $599, or Kindle Fire 8.9HD with 128GB for $499, which can easily undercut the iPad. 

post #21 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

A - ... as nice as it is to have a 128gb (on-board) storage option (at a rather exorbitant cost), merely increasing capacity does not fundamentally change the functionality of the iPad.

B- Likely the single biggest obstacle for to having such a large amount of storage on an iPad is that iOS still lacks a user accessible file system, so as to easily acess all of those 'CAD files' etc. one might load on all that new space.

Note: Several competing mobile devices have reached the 128gb storage level already via having 64gb of built-in storage plus (fully OS integrated) 64gb microSDXC/Class 10 cards (often found for around US 50.00) with 128gb microSDXC cards soon to be released.
Not Really... at least not until it gets a user accessible file system and the abilty to run apps in individual windows etc.

A- That's what makes it a good product;

B- You're right, but that's also why iPad is a perfect tool for 90% of people. Others are better off with a MacBook XXX

Note: Ridiculousestissimus.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #22 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

 

SD Cards in mobile devices are yucky. Apple not adding an SD Card to the iPad is what people unconsciously love about Apple = restraint, focus, simplicity, elegance. If you don't understand this, then IMO you misunderstand Apple.

I thought that this was quite obvious from his post ^^

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #23 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

Same old post under different names?

Must be, two people couldn't possibly have the same opinion about Apple. ;-)  BTW, I'm not sure what you're talking about, but I joined in 2008 and pretty much never comment on this site, but I feel strongly about this.  I've owned every iPhone except the 5.  I'm bored by it...OS and hardware.

post #24 of 152

I am surprised by the obvious dislike of the article author and the dismissal of the content (and its length), by so many here. I don't see whats so wrong. Its a good article and it is refreshing to have someone supporting Apple's strategy after reading so many know-it-alls telling us what Apple should do to avoid doom.

 

re the 128gb - It seems like a shrewd move. Many people will want the extra storage. It makes the iPad more of a laptop replacement and allows for more photos, videos, and music - the great storage joggers. Another point is that by upping the max storage to 128 gb, the 64 gb is now at the higher end of the middle ground. Many people will hold off from buying the highest end because it seems excessive. I wonder if the sales of the 64 gb iPad will increase as a result. 

post #25 of 152
One compelling reason to buy 128 GB iPad 4 is less of a fear that one may outgrow a 64 GB model. Those who want to purchase a retina-display tablet with powerful CPU and graphics to do something more than just content consumption now have a viable alternative to a laptop. I can see musicians, photographers, graphic designers, doctors, etc. choosing the 128 GB iPad version as their mobile computing device. If I were in the market for an iPad now, I would choose the 128 GB iPad 4 vs its 64 GB sibling. With the right software and the right sync strategy, the 128 GB iPad 4 could serve its owner for many years to come - it has enough power and now enough storage that would allow it not to be obsolete a long time. Certain apps already available in the App Store allow the iPad function as a secondary content-creation tool instead of relegating the iPad to content consumption exclusively.

My personal computing paradigm recently shifted from laptops back to desktops, which provide at least twice more horsepower for content creation at half of what laptops cost. When I need a computing device on the go, I use my iPads. At the office and at home, I use my desktops (iMacs and Mac Minis). I sync most of the content via the cloud (iCloud and Dropbox depending on the type of content). I wouldn't be surprised if others are considering the shift from laptops to a dual-computing paradigm consisting of desktops and tablets.
post #26 of 152
Quote:

Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

 

For companies and institutions that are heavily invested in iOS (as many Fortune 500 companies are), paying an extra $100 for double the device's document and app capacity is an easy decision to make. However, switching to an alternative platform and vendor (at any cost) involves a significant barrier.

Backed by economies of scale in sourcing storage memory cheaply in high volumes, Apple is returning to its historical trend with iPods in offering more storage than its competitors could at the same price.

As iOS apps grow in size (a trend accelerated by Retina display graphics) alongside media files (similarly abetted by HD videos), consumers will increasingly demand more storage at affordable prices. The more Apple can do to fill up its users' iOS devices, the more demand it will stoke for greater storage capacities, resulting in higher sales volumes of memory and lower component costs.

While its competitors shave down storage capacity to reach impressive entry level prices, Apple appears focused on delivering value-oriented products that are profitable. Storage capacity is one of the most visible, valuable features of a mobile device, and therefore is something users will willing pay more to obtain.


Apple's new 128-gigabyte fat iPad bucks the trend toward cheaper, less powerful tablet and netbooks, the kind of lower end devices that many observers had predicted to rapidly win tablet market share away from Apple's iPad line.

Google's Nexus 7, for example, delivered its breakthrough $250 starting price by only offering 16 gigabytes of storage, which like Apple's iPad line, is not expandable. Amazon's Kindle Fire similarly reaches below $200 by offering 16 gigabytes of storage. Neither company's smaller form factor tablets offer a 64-gigabyte version like Apple's iPad mini.

Because they are competing almost exclusively on price, they can't offer a 64-gigabyte version without pushing their products squarely into the price range of Apple's iPad line. And as the first generation of Android 3.0 Honeycomb tablets aptly demonstrated, there's not really an insatiable demand for tablets in general, and certainly not for non-iPad tablets priced like the iPad.

 

* * * *


While Google and Apple are both chasing money, Apple is successfully implementing a series of long term strategies while Google appears to be running after new objectives each year, and abandoning most of them just as rapidly.

Now I think, as will all AI's reactive posts after Apple announcements, that Dilger is claiming Apple's strategies are vastly superior to competitors.  He's missing the point.  There are two different strategies between the Android Tablets and the iPad with regards to storage.  Some Android tablets offer expansion slots.  Something many people critique Apple for not addressing.  With a 64gb SD card available now for a little as $50 retail, that still beats the iPad on price alone...Now i'm not saying that's a better or worse solution, just a different way of achieving the same goal [increased total storage].

 

Paying $100 extra for more storage is the "Apple Tax".  You can buy a 64gb SSD for as little at $70 retail.  Granted maybe not the same chips apple uses, but they're out there.  Apple's advantage to keep their margins high is by designing devices that aren't user expandable. Look at what the future of Macbooks are....the MB Air and new MBPr both have SSDs and are permanently soldered into the system board.  Say goodbye to end-user upgrades.

 

I think the other half of Apple's plan here is (IMO) that they themselves have little confidence in [their own] "cloud" storage [for personal data] and are making up for their deficiencies in that arena by adding more on-board storage.  This is not a criticism but an observation.

 

Maybe i'm not a power user of 3rd party apps, which i've stated in the past, but I just can't imagine completely filling up my 32gb iPad with just Apps and associated app files.  PDF's are not huge files unless they are not compressed enough.  I'm an architect and I can clearly see the advantage of carrying around a full set of construction documents on my iPad, but even the big high rise projects i've worked on barely tap the 50-100 mb file sizes.  And an average project can last up to a year in design and another year in construction.  So there's no real need to carry around a ton of PDFs for me.  AutoCad and Revit are both pointless on a tablet because the UI is too advanced for simple touch interface...i've tried.  They're basic viewers only.  Now I can see the advantage for professional photographers.  Graphic designers too, but are graphic designers in particular going to do content creation "on-the-go" on an iPad, i doubt it.  They're going to shrink down their work for presentations at best.  My point is, IMO this article is hugely biased.  Although, what did you expect from an Apple related news site...fair and balanced? :P

post #27 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

What does Dilger mean by "fat" iPad?

Is the "fat" referring to the bump in storage or the physical size of the device?

So far, nothing on the Apple Store website showing it as an option.

 

Maybe he mean "phat".

He's not referring to this:

 

He's making a reference to this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_Mac

post #28 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Likely the single biggest obstacle for to having such a large amount of storage on an iPad is that iOS still lacks a user accessible file system, so as to easily acess all of those 'CAD files' etc. one might load on all that new space.
 

having a visible and accessible file system is not the point of the iPad.

Oh, "all those 'CAD files'" get stored in Autodesk's "cloud" as part of the App.  So no need for extra storage there.

post #29 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

having a visible and accessible file system is not the point of the iPad.

Oh, "all those 'CAD files'" get stored in Autodesk's "cloud" as part of the App.  So no need for extra storage there.

I don't like clouds though. Clouds tend to bring rain.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #30 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Goes on sale February 5th.

i'm fully aware of that and have seen the PR statement, I mean on the store page there is nothing show 128gb as an option or 'comming soon' whatever, and your comment is taken out of my context.

 

I get the "Fat Mac" thing now.  Impressive reference.

post #31 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Let's examine what you've written and implied here. You're bored with iOS and the HW. Does that mean Apple should change what clearly works because you want using your device to be some sort of exciting adventure? Personally, I want Apple to build off the foundations they have not start from scratch. I want my phone to work as expected.

You said that it's because Jobs is gone but that's only been a year so you're implication was that iOS and the iPhone was an exciting escapade up until iOS 6 and the iPhone 5. You feel it's only happened because Steve is gone despite it being the most radical change the iPhone has ever seen then I think you need to reconsider your position on this because you're not looking at it objectively.

And also, I'd say that most people would rather have a boring system that just works than a revolutionary system that needs efforts to adjust to...

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #32 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jozsoo View Post

Gee, has anyone at AI cared to read this "article"? If the "author" can't, at least someone who edits stuff? Like, you know, an "editor" that speaks and reads the language? This piece is a veritable typo and grammar slip treasure trove. The worst in years, probably.

Not to mention the structure.  There is repetition of information strewn all through it.  3 examples of a given point.  say it once.

post #33 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

And also, I'd say that most people would rather have a boring system that just works than a revolutionary system that needs efforts to adjust to...

This is also a great point.

post #34 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post


My personal computing paradigm recently shifted from laptops back to desktops, which provide at least twice more horsepower for content creation at half of what laptops cost. When I need a computing device on the go, I use my iPads. At the office and at home, I use my desktops (iMacs and Mac Minis). I sync most of the content via the cloud (iCloud and Dropbox depending on the type of content). I wouldn't be surprised if others are considering the shift from laptops to a dual-computing paradigm consisting of desktops and tablets.

Yeah, my next computer will definitely be a desktop, my first in 13 years. Like you, I find myself using my iPad for a lot of things my laptop used to do, and when I need something more powerful and serious (mostly for video editing) the laptop (a top-of-the-line 2009 MBP) struggles, heats up to a point where you would burn yourself if you tried to keep your hand on it, and sounds like an airplane taking off. I figure I can get a more powerful desktop, and if I really need the portability I will make do with the iPad and/or the laptop. I wouldn't be surprised if there were enough of us in this position that Apple starts to see a trend of desktop sales replacing a portion of laptop sales.

post #35 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Fat?

My thoughts exactly!

post #36 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

Not to mention the structure.  There is repetition of information strewn all through it.  3 examples of a given point.  say it once.

Strunk and White have written a book about this...

However, the FT hates S&W according to : http://m.weeklystandard.com/articles/war-strunk-and-white_554816.html

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #37 of 152
Why did Intel call their new laptop spec the Ultrabook instead of something like the Ultrathin? Just the name Ultrabook makes you think of some guy in an alleyway opening his raincoat to show you the Ultrabooks next to the Molex watches and the Biffany diamonds. Intel had Apple on the brain so much they didn't realize how stupid the name is.

Other manufacturers are trying to compete with Apple with their spec sheets. A can opener with a clock has more features than a can opener without one, but no one cares. People don't count the features and buy the product with the largest number of them.

The Surface will fail because it has already failed. It's a netbook disguised as a tablet.
post #38 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

One compelling reason to buy 128 GB iPad 4 is less of a fear that one may outgrow a 64 GB model.

Yep, now there's going to be the fear of out growing the 128gb model.  There are people who will say it's still not enough.

post #39 of 152
Fun to read the comments.... "Fanboy, reading a lot into storage, drank the koolaid" all very funny.

But his history is dead on, and the logic is sound. If, and is it just if, but if Apple can get some companies and individuals to look at that storage size as not just useful but maybe a future proofing, this becomes self fulfilling. Developers start to think that maybe that huge business class app had a market after all, or that yes, video editing is viable now that you have room to store all the video. A few new must have apps show up, others jump on the band wagon. Next time I buy an iPad I wonder, is this size enough? Sure it is now, but look at some of these new apps... Maybe I up size a step. People upsizing encourages the devs, who make even more impressive apps.

In a year, if this happens, and Apple is selling mostly 64 and 128 pads, how many of those commenting will apologize for their comments?

Yeah.
OSX, because making UNIX user friendly is easier than debugging windows.
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OSX, because making UNIX user friendly is easier than debugging windows.
Reply
post #40 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

 

Seemed. Yes, it probably seemed that way when Steve was around. Maybe it was the RDF. Not sure. Sadly, though, it really wasn't the truth.

 

iMac 1997

 

iPod 2003

 

iPhone 2007

 

iPad 2010

 

Do you see the pattern? Several years between products.

 

Maybe in 3 years if nothing new has come out then you might have a strong argument. Until then, don't lose your objectivity.

Apple doesn't have a crystal ball, it has a crack team of designers/engineers/innovators.

That team can hardly be asked to be changing the world several times a year, while still making a (huge) profit ^^

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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