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iOS 6.1 sees 22% adoption in less than two days, could be fastest ever - Page 3

post #81 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

The only reasonable answer is that the 4"+ sized Android-based phones are not the most popular or common.

I think that is where the tag 'cheap' comes from when people address 'Android users'. Or is it all in the software? I don't know; they both look cheap to me. But as I understand it the flagship/phablets are similar priced as an iPhone, so maybe that 'cheap' tag is appropriate no matter what(?)
post #82 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I think that is where the tag 'cheap' comes from when people address 'Android users'. Or is it all in the software? I don't know; they both look cheap to me. But as I understand it the flagship/phablets are similar priced as an iPhone, so maybe that 'cheap' tag is appropriate no matter what(?)

I was thinking about that yesterday with the BB Z10 announcement. Apple has really changed the perception, or rather shifted what we expect as being precision and quality consumer electronics. I think the BB Z10 is great, in general, but the fit and finish compared to the iPhone it appears to be only alight while still being above most Android-based devices we see.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #83 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

22% for a point update (with no marketing) in 2 days, for an OS with this large of a userbase, is insane. I would have guess 10% at the most. 

  1. Turn on iDevice.
  2. "There is an update available".
  3. Touch [Download and Install].

 

I'm surprised the figure isn't higher.

I will NEVER pay $679 for an 8GB plastic cell phone
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I will NEVER pay $679 for an 8GB plastic cell phone
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post #84 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post

  1. Turn on iDevice.
  2. "There is an update available".
  3. Touch [Download and Install].

 

I'm surprised the figure isn't higher.

I am too.

 

EDIT: On second thought there probably are a lot of iOS devices that don't get used daily, some older ones perhaps not at all anymore. 20% is pretty good really.

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #85 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post

  1. Turn on iDevice.
  2. "There is an update available".
  3. Touch [Download and Install].

I'm surprised the figure isn't higher.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I am too.

From past experience the message stating there is an update gets pushed out over a week or so. Is it even available for all iDevices in all countries or are there barriers that, for instance, prevent the message on iDevices in China?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #86 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


So you think that the expensive flagship devices are being bought by customers but then are not being used because they prefer the cheaper, normal sized Android-based devices? 

 

No sir.  I was proposing that there are still lots of older smaller screened devices still being used out there.  The Google dashboard tracks everyone who hits the Play Market, and that includes people with devices that are a couple of years old.   However...

 

Quote:

The only reasonable answer is that the 4"+ sized Android-based phones are not the most popular or common.

 

After checking the Android dashboard, it sure looks like the S2, S3, Nexus, Note and other 4+ inch screened devices are well represented.

 

Perhaps some people are confused about what "normal" size indicates.  (The suggested size diagram isn't super accurate.)  When programming for Android, these are the categories that developers actually use:

 

Galaxy Mini - small, ldpi

 

Galaxy Ace - normal, mdpi

Galaxy S2 (4.3") - normal, hdpi

Galaxy Nexus (4.65") - normal, xhdpi

Galaxy S3 (4.8") - normal, xhdpi 

 

Galaxy Note - large, xhdpi

Galaxy Nexus 7 - large, tvdpi

Galaxy Tab 10.1 - xlarge, mdpi

 

Notice that screens up to 4.8" usually use the "normal" screen range.   The 5" phablets and 7" tablets are "large".


Edited by KDarling - 1/31/13 at 8:52pm
post #87 of 89
How unsurprising that this thread should quickly degenerate into an Android hate fest. That's so atypical for AppleInsider.
 
There is a lot of confusion about how Android updates work and when they're needed. KDarling is correct -- OS updates aren't needed for Google Apps updates. YouTube, Maps, Calendar, Street View, Search, Chrome, GMail, etc are updated independently of the OS. Likewise, the Google Apps Android APIs aren't part of Android itself and are updated separately (see YouTube, Maps, Analytics).
 
It's true that newer versions of Android add new APIs and fix bugs in old ones. Several commenters mistakenly think that dev's can't use these new APIs. This is not the case. Google extracts the new APIs and packages them in a support library which supports older versions back to 1.6. There are a few missing pieces in the support library, but the Android dev community has stepped up to back port them. See, for example, ActionBarSherlock and Unified Preferences. The support library is generally preferred to the native APIs, since it's easier to add new features and fix bugs. For example, ViewPagers are only available in the support library. Similarly, there was a bug in the LruCache class -- it was added in Android 3.1, but it's trimToSize() method wasn't publicly callable until 4.2. Rather than force the hassle of an OS update, the bug was patched in the support library (in rev 11).
post #88 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Perhaps some people are confused about what "normal" size indicates.  (The suggested size diagram isn't super accurate.)  When programming for Android, these are thecategories that developers actually use:


Galaxy Mini - small, ldpi

Galaxy Ace - normal, mdpi
Galaxy S2 (4.3") - normal, hdpi
Galaxy Nexus (4.65") - normal, xhdpi

Galaxy S3 (4.8") - normal, xhdpi 


Galaxy Note - large, xhdpi
Galaxy Nexus 7 - large, tvdpi

Galaxy Tab 10.1 - xlarge, mdpi


Notice that screens up to 4.8" usually use the "normal" screen range.   The 5" phablets and 7" tablets are "large".

I thought that went against the chart I used for my posting but upon looking again I guess up to 5" could be considered "normal" by Google's standards, if you want to call it a standard since it overlap with large by about a full inch.


"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #89 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I thought that went against the chart I used for my posting but upon looking again I guess up to 5" could be considered "normal" by Google's standards, if you want to call it a standard since it overlap with large by about a full inch.

 

Yep, the overlap is saying that an image or other resource that's created for a "normal" screen will most likely be used on screens that range from about 3" to 5".  

 

However, if the manufacturer thinks it'll look better for some reason, a phone on the upper end of the range might instead use the image created for a "large" category.

 

It also gives the developer a little leeway, so they can use a nicer image on a wider range of devices, if it'll take and use it.

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