or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple awarded design patents for slide-to-unlock and original iPhone design
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple awarded design patents for slide-to-unlock and original iPhone design

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office granted Apple patent numbers D675,639 and D675,612, respectively covering the much-disputed slide-to-unlock user interface asset and design for the original iPhone.

slide-to-unlock
Source: USPTO


Apple's patent for a "Display screen or portion thereof with a graphical user interface" offers images specifically illustrating the rounded rectangular bar iPhone users have grown accustomed to seeing at the bottom of their lock screens. Drawings for the patent show the unlock slider in a series of largely similar configurations, with the last showing the slide bar all the way to the right in the unlock position.

Slide-to-unlock has been a hotly contested patent, with Apple claiming in German court that Samsung's Galaxy Nexus infringed on the property, only for a Google patent from 2010 to later emerge covering similar functions.

A continuation of Apple's slide-to-unlock patent was granted late last year, seemingly covering the open-to-app functions seen in Google's filing. Apple's application, though, was filed in August of 2011, while Google's was first filed for in August of 2010.

Apple itself has had troubles regarding slide-to-unlock, as Swedish company Neonode claimed last year that its own gesture unlock patent ? used in a Windows CE handset ? predated Apple's own filing. Neonode at the time expressed interest in entering licensing negotiations with Apple, though no further information on such negotiations, if they occurred, has emerged. Neonode's filing specifically states that graphical elements on screen do not move along with the unlock gesture, while Apple's filing specifically states that they do move.

iPhone design patent


The second design patent awarded on Tuesday covers the rounded-edge design of the original iPhone. The contours of the early versions of Apple's best-selling phone have also been the source of considerable legal struggle, making up a significant portion of Apple's landmark patent case against Samsung last year. With the Galaxy S III, Samsung eventually made a larger move away from Apple-like hardware designs, but representatives for the company said that move was part of a natural process and not the result of litigation from Apple.
post #2 of 14
Next week these patents will be invalidated by another judge. Then the following week they will be reinstated by a third judge. The week after that.....
post #3 of 14

Oh my.  This might start the whole "they've patented rounded rectangles" debate again.

 

You see, in a design patent, dashed lines don't count.  Only the solid ones do.  Once you remove the dashed lines, all that's remaining in this patent are these shapes...

 

 

PS.  And the shaded versions, which might make a tiny bit of sense.  But it would make far more sense if a specific design patent included the arrow and text.  

 

Otherwise, Apple could go after anyone with any rounded rectangular switch with a rounded rectangular button.


Edited by KDarling - 2/5/13 at 10:06pm
post #4 of 14

Doesn't matter. If Apple invented true cold fusion, they'd have their patent invalidated citing prior art.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #5 of 14

Surprised the first comment wasn't about that useless Neonode phone that haters are always bringing up. Here's a tibit for you:

 

In the patent application Apple made for the slide-to-unlock patent they included (as companies always do) references to other patents or similar information to show why their system deserves a patent.

 

One of the references Apple included was the owners manual for the Neonode n1M phone. Now all you haters, sit back and think about that for a minute.

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply
post #6 of 14

Yes, Lets get another Billion from SlimeSung!

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraBuggy View Post

Yes, Lets get another Billion from SlimeSung!

Why? They don't have anything that remotely looks like that.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #8 of 14
That's not the original iphone, that's the iPhone 3G/3GS
post #9 of 14

Seriously AI Apple is granted patents all the time why is this even news? 

post #10 of 14

Btw, here are all the patents Apple was granted yesterday....all 40 of them.

 

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2013/02/apple-wins-40-granted-patents-covering-such-matters-as-key-ios-interfaces-oled-fabrication-compass-calibration-much-more.html#more

post #11 of 14
Finally!
post #12 of 14
I still find that slide-to-unlock patent ridiculous...

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Oh my.  This might start the whole "they've patented rounded rectangles" debate again.

 

You see, in a design patent, dashed lines don't count.  Only the solid ones do.  Once you remove the dashed lines, all that's remaining in this patent are these shapes...

 

 

PS.  And the shaded versions, which might make a tiny bit of sense.  But it would make far more sense if a specific design patent included the arrow and text.  

 

Otherwise, Apple could go after anyone with any rounded rectangular switch with a rounded rectangular button.

 

What do you think this?

 

 

Would this beat the "Design" patent?  I am genuinely curious. (sorry for the poor drawing)

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjb View Post

Would this beat the "Design" patent?  I am genuinely curious. (sorry for the poor drawing)

 

Sure, I would think so.  Different shapes and an explicit arrow.

 

I'm more thinking of all the folks who've made living for the past couple of decades creating both industrial GUIs and mobile UI packages, who designed with the same basic shape that Apple is claiming.

 

 

(Prior art that a Dutch judge cited, when he dismissed Apple's original slide-to-unlock patent, included references to industrial touch controls from long ago.  After all, slide-to-unlock is basically just a spring-loaded slide switch.)


Edited by KDarling - 2/6/13 at 1:21pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple awarded design patents for slide-to-unlock and original iPhone design