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Apple courts OLED expert away from LG

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Apple has hired an OLED expert who was previously a senior researcher of the screen technology at LG Display.

Dr. Lee Jeung-jil has joined Apple, according to a report from OLED-info.com. During his time at LG, he was involved with printing technology research.

Apple has been rumored for years to switch to OLED screens, which promise thinner designs and better battery life. But to date the company has instead utilized LCD panels with in-plane switching technology for superior viewing angles.

Samsung
Samsung showed off a flexible OLED display at this year's CES.


The company has shown interest in OLED behind the scenes in the form of patent applications. But Apple has not yet manufactured a product with an OLED panel.

In recent months, discussion of potential OLED panel use by Apple has died down, as the latest rumors instead peg the iPhone maker as a potential candidate for Sharp's IGZO displays. Sharp showcased its IGZO technology at this year's Consumer Electronics Show, boasting that its panels can have twice the resolution of a conventional LCD display with up to 90 percent power savings.

But Apple's chief rival, Samsung, remains a strong proponent of OLED display technology. At this year's CES, Samsung partnered with Microsoft to show off its new "Youm" flexible OLED displays, with one prototype Windows Phone device sporting a curved screen that wrapped around the edges of the device.
post #2 of 28
I'm not sure if this is good news or not. More. Importantly the article is not completely correct about power usage, on average OLEDs use more power than LCDs.
post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I'm not sure if this is good news or not. More. Importantly the article is not completely correct about power usage, on average OLEDs use more power than LCDs.

I doubt if it means very much at this point. It costs Apple very little to continue to look at technologies like this, even if they're years from being ready for their product line.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #4 of 28

"...

Jueng –jil (James) Lee--a former Research fellow from LG Display and a senior person in  LG Display’s R&D effort to create a printed AMOLED TV. Prior to joining LG Display, Dr. Lee was responsible for development at Cambridge Display Technology (CDT, now Sumitomo), the leading developer of solution-based polymer based OLED material."
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post #5 of 28
Bull. This guy isn't an engineer - he's a marketing expert. Apple doesn't employ engineers as they get everyone else to make stuff for them so they don't need any.


That said, just because he's an OLED expert doesn't mean Apple is making OLED displays. He could very likely have expertise in other areas of interest to Apple in regards to LCD manufacturing. They said he worked in printing. Well, that covers a lot of ground in terms of screens, touch panels or any such device with embedded electronics.
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Bull. This guy isn't an engineer - he's a marketing expert. Apple doesn't employ engineers as they get everyone else to make stuff for them so they don't need any.

Huh?
Hardware Engineers (492 vacancies)
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post #7 of 28

Asymco tweeted this morning that Apple will provide $9 billion capital investment in 2013 to Toshiba Yokkaichi Memory (presumably NAND), Japan Display LCD and Sharp LCD.

post #8 of 28
That's clever; not breaking down the numbers. Anyones guess then where they put their money.
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post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Bull. This guy isn't an engineer - he's a marketing expert. Apple doesn't employ engineers as they get everyone else to make stuff for them so they don't need any.


That said, just because he's an OLED expert doesn't mean Apple is making OLED displays. He could very likely have expertise in other areas of interest to Apple in regards to LCD manufacturing. They said he worked in printing. Well, that covers a lot of ground in terms of screens, touch panels or any such device with embedded electronics.

 

Eric the half 

first you state that he is NOT an engineer, with the ludicrous claim that Apple dont employ them anyway, then you go on to say most likely he has expertise in other areas such as LCD manufacturing??? An expert in LCD manufacturing is rather odd for a marketing expert

post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Bull. This guy isn't an engineer - he's a marketing expert. Apple doesn't employ engineers as they get everyone else to make stuff for them so they don't need any.
Engineers design stuff, not (generally) manufacturer it.
Quote:
That said, just because he's an OLED expert doesn't mean Apple is making OLED displays
Didn't read anything about Apple "making" OLEDs.
Apple could very easily design and use OLEDs and not "make" a single one, as they do &have done with dozens/hundreds of other items.
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post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Bull. This guy isn't an engineer - he's a marketing expert. Apple doesn't employ engineers as they get everyone else to make stuff for them so they don't need any.
 

You missed the /s or it was just implied.

post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Bull. This guy isn't an engineer - he's a marketing expert. Apple doesn't employ engineers as they get everyone else to make stuff for them so they don't need any.


That said, just because he's an OLED expert doesn't mean Apple is making OLED displays. He could very likely have expertise in other areas of interest to Apple in regards to LCD manufacturing. They said he worked in printing. Well, that covers a lot of ground in terms of screens, touch panels or any such device with embedded electronics.

 

Cue one for most ignorant statement of the year award.

 

From PatentlyApple.com:

 

 

Quote:
According to news from Seoul's Jose Ilbo's online newspaper, Apple has recently recruited a former senior researcher at LG Display, Dr. Lee Jeung-jil, who was in charge of researching OLED printing technology. Prior to joining LG Display, Lee was a part of the P-OLED research at Cambridge Display Technology (now owned by Sumitomo). The report concludes that "By recruiting an OLED expert, Apple may be working to develop its own OLED display." The question that Apple may be working on OLED should be put into context. The fact is that Apple has been working on OLED since at least 2009 and in fact has just been granted a patent regarding OLED fabrication.
post #13 of 28

LG represents failure.

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post #14 of 28
Yes
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

You missed the /s or it was just implied.
Yes it was implied. I expected AI readers to get that by now. I've often talked about how many engineers Apple employs or how they spare 1,000 every summer for WWDC that developers can talk to first hand about their projects.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Cue one for most ignorant statement of the year award.

From PatentlyApple.com:
Just because Apple has OLED patents means nothing. Companies deciding on which technology to use will often research several methods to determine which is best. Along the way they often develop new technology and get patents for it. It would be stupid to throw away research for things you decided not to use as they could be useful at a later date.

Apple has loads of patents on things they don't use and probably never will.
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

LG represents failure.

They are pretty much the largest maker of these panels. The others likely got out due to falling margins. If price didn't motivate people, you would have less of a chance of seeing LG in their current position.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Yes
Yes it was implied. I expected AI readers to get that by now. I've often talked about how many engineers Apple employs or how they spare 1,000 every summer for WWDC that developers can talk to first hand about their projects.


That's why I was surprised by the responses. I thought I may have missed some recent post or something.

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

on average OLEDs use more power than LCDs.

 

This is debatable. OLEDs lack of backlighting theoretically make an OLED screen more efficient than an LCD. The only studies that I have seen showing otherwise usually involve testing at maximum lumen output of the screen. In this scenario, you are comparing an LED screen at its minimum power consumption to an OLED screen at its maximum power consumption. Hardly a fair comparison if you ask me. Most users don't stare at a bright white screen all day, but instead, their screens are being used in the lower range of lumen output where OLED screens truly shine in power efficiency.

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by THT View Post

Asymco tweeted this morning that Apple will provide $9 billion capital investment in 2013 to Toshiba Yokkaichi Memory (presumably NAND), Japan Display LCD and Sharp LCD.

Why doesnt Apple just buy out these companies :D

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtacee1990 View Post

Why doesnt Apple just buy out these companies :D

As consumers tastes change and technology moves on why would Apple want to be stuck with the factories? Their current strategy of letting others do the grunt work makes much more sense and allows them to be more nimble.

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post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by xtacee1990 View Post

Why doesnt Apple just buy out these companies :D


That doesn't coincide with what they've done in the past. Having the money to do so doesn't provide a business plan for integration or even mean it's a good idea. Local laws in foreign countries may further complicate things. If Apple is considered a US based company, are they allowed to directly own factories in X nation? The laws of that nation would apply. Apple seems to invest in a lot of infrastructure that is housed within the factories of manufacturing partners. This makes sense if these manufacturing partners cannot afford the upfront investment. Apple provides either equipment or funds earmarked for specific use. This means they can't necessarily be used to pay creditors in the case of a company like Sharp. They're relatively secure. It's not necessarily profitable or simple to just bring everything in house. The necessary audits alone might take thousands of hours and reveal incompatibilities. This is fairly safe route if Apple is confident they can get what they pay for.

 

Also if you look at their purchasing history, much of the time it has consisted of smaller and sometimes undervalued companies with talented teams.

post #21 of 28

And before LG, this guy worked at Samsung.

 

AI, again, leaving out juicy information that would make Apple look bad.

 

Tsk tsk.

"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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"Like I said before, share price will dip into the $400."  - 11/21/12 by Galbi

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post #22 of 28
Again, this is the way to stay ahead. Apple works on batteries, processors, and now screens. Invent, develop and patent technology that your competition can't use (unless your S*) and you get a technology leap.

We see the really thin design and charge of the batteries in Apple's products, and we see great functionality in the Ax chip with regards to both GPU and CPU performance.
post #23 of 28
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post
AI, again, leaving out juicy information that would make Apple look bad.

 

Tsk tsk.

 

Your imagination is broken.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post


Engineers design stuff, not (generally) manufacturer it.
 

 

That's simply not true (ignoring the typo). Some engineers design. Some are involved in manufacturing, because manufacturing is not just about running CNC machines or assembling parts. Quite often, design and manufacturing overlap significantly. To say engineers only design and do not manufacture "stuff" reflects a poor understanding of engineering.

 

There are also many engineers who do neither.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Your imagination is broken.

I get what it means for someone to have an active imagination.

I get what it means for someone to not have a particularly active imagination.

 

But what is a broken imagination? Does it conjure up many ideas that make no sense? Does it spin in circles?

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

If Apple is considered a US based company, are they allowed to directly own factories in X nation? The laws of that nation would apply. 

 

Ah yes, they are allowed in general. Sure, approval by local governments is required. But this happens all the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

Apple seems to invest in a lot of infrastructure that is housed within the factories of manufacturing partners. This makes sense if these manufacturing partners cannot afford the upfront investment. Apple provides either equipment or funds earmarked for specific use. This means they can't necessarily be used to pay creditors in the case of a company like Sharp. They're relatively secure. It's not necessarily profitable or simple to just bring everything in house. The necessary audits alone might take thousands of hours and reveal incompatibilities. This is fairly safe route if Apple is confident they can get what they pay for.

 

 

These reasons kind of make more sense. But, IMO, there are more important, relevant factors:

 

- Apple wants to guarantee capacity. Owning equipment at the suppliers' plants does that.

- Apple sometimes designs and dictates manufacturing processes, specifying the exact machines they want to use which the manufacturing companies may not have.

- Unless a company has done business before with Apple, it is unlikely they have the "spare" capacity read to go. 

- To tool up as Apple specifies, a manufacturing contractor needs to make back their capex investment and may charge higher prices to achieve that (and may demand a longer commitment than Apple desires). By providing tooling, Apple can negotiate better pricing (hence increasing GM) and better dicate term of commitment.

post #27 of 28
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Does it conjure up many ideas that make no sense?

 

That was my thinking.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galbi View Post

And before LG, this guy worked at Samsung.

 

AI, again, leaving out juicy information that would make Apple look bad.

 

Tsk tsk.

why would this make Apple look bad? Industry poaching is a common thing and normally are not poplularly reported. Eric S worked on the Apple's board in the past before he joined Google. It was only known because he allegedly stole Apple's iphone concept for Google. 

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