or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple CEO pans OLED displays but stops short of ruling out iPhone with larger screen
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple CEO pans OLED displays but stops short of ruling out iPhone with larger screen - Page 2

post #41 of 51

Insulting users in your second post isn't the best thing to do.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #42 of 51

But an insult that was well deserved.  Fillie's arrogance bit him in the butt.  

post #43 of 51
Originally Posted by Noliving View Post
But an insult that was well deserved.  Fillie's arrogance bit him in the butt.  


The best way to counter arrogance is being right where they're wrong. Arbitrary justification or no.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #44 of 51

Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post



Insulting users in your second post isn't the best thing to do.

 

Insulting somebody's very first post in a forum, unless they're making some egregious insult or trolling, is even worse.


Edited by HAL-9000 - 2/15/13 at 4:57pm
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by HAL-9000 View Post

I knew when I posted originally somebody would read what I posted, then assume I was confused because they didn't read it right - then get smarmy.


There is no 'black light' on additive colorspaces indeed. But that's my original point, 'black' in an RGB colorspace is nothing at all, i.e. zero.

But LCD's are always 'on,' aren't they? Backlight is always going, they are never at zero when turned on. In other words, an LCD's version of 'black' emits light (look at your iPhone displaying an RGB = 0 image in the dark, is it black?) and is a fundamental weakness of any backlit display technology.


What's more, since you start with a max color temp established by your display's backlight, any color you render through an LCD is subtracted from that absolute color - just like printing on a white sheet of paper. OLED's - just like plasmas and CRT's - add colors from a true zero. An OLED's absolute black is dark as the display when the device is turned off (try same experiment with RGB = 0 image on Samscum SIII Galaxy in the dark, you will find true black).

I'll learn 'what the hell I'm talking about' when you learn how to comprehend what you read beyond the grammar. Try reading my original post again.
Of course the gist of your point is all pro OLED. If you read my post, I was not arguing against it. Maybe you should check dictionary on the word grammar.

From your 'original' quote:
Quote:
But intrinsically, LCD's are a mish-mash of colorspaces - they take an RGB signal (adding up from black to white) and physically render it CMYK (subract from an absolute whitespace - the backlight - to the color desired, like an inket printing on paper).

You are the one using wrong terms. I already explained what was wrong but of course you ignore it and say your point is all correct.

CMYK is process printing colours -Cyan Magenta Yellow and black hence my explanation before, there is no 'K' in additive colour or even subtractive colour. It is a printing term

Secondly, your analogy to printing on paper is incorrect.

Printing, either as basic process or over printing, absorbs light and bounces at different wavelengths depending on what is absorbed. Obviously 100% = black.
(As a side note: a lot of the time 100K alone will not create a deep black so 40% cyan is typically used to make it richer without causing tearing to paper)

Anyway, LCDs use various backlights like CCFL, WLED and another called RGB-LED which does away with the extra layer of colour films. Either way, the resultant image is created using additive colour.

So LCD does not:
- mishmash colour spaces
- render RGB from CMYK
- do the same as printing

Inspiration begins with google

Reply

Inspiration begins with google

Reply
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by HAL-9000 View Post

The hard contrasts and garish colors on Samsung OLED phones (and it happens) are not a result of weakness in the display tech, but the display tech being too vicious and accurate with content designed and calibrated to look good on inferior displays. A good analogy is a MacBook Retina display with non-retina programs - it looks like crap because of the source, not the display.

Reading back, what you said before is not entirely true either.

As is the same with other wide gamut displays - if you view content which does not use colour profiling, results would be skewed. Lot of content viewed on browsers look gaudy as a result.

The bigger reason samsung amoled looks over saturated is because it is not properly calibrated and over compensates the shorter green light lifespan with larger green subpixel. If you read up on colour tests it shows inaccurate colour reproduction.

Inspiration begins with google

Reply

Inspiration begins with google

Reply
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fillie View Post


Of course the gist of your point is all pro OLED. If you read my post, I was not arguing against it. Maybe you should check dictionary on the word grammar.

From your 'original' quote:
You are the one using wrong terms. I already explained what was wrong but of course you ignore it and say your point is all correct.

CMYK is process printing colours -Cyan Magenta Yellow and black hence my explanation before, there is no 'K' in additive colour or even subtractive colour. It is a printing term

Secondly, your analogy to printing on paper is incorrect.

Printing, either as basic process or over printing, absorbs light and bounces at different wavelengths depending on what is absorbed. Obviously 100% = black.
(As a side note: a lot of the time 100K alone will not create a deep black so 40% cyan is typically used to make it richer without causing tearing to paper)

Anyway, LCDs use various backlights like CCFL, WLED and another called RGB-LED which does away with the extra layer of colour films. Either way, the resultant image is created using additive colour.

So LCD does not:
- mishmash colour spaces
- render RGB from CMYK
- do the same as printing

 

Oh boy, where to start here. Printing on (white) paper as an analogy for LCD screens rendering colors is perfectly apt - you take a point of maximum values as your constant (the backlight or the paper), then subtract from that constant into your desired color by filtering with chemicals that absorb (not emit) certain colors. That is exact opposite of displays that make their own light making their colors, and that is exact physical opposite of 'additive color' as you describe.

 

And to my original point, that is a problem with LCD monitors rendering an RGB colorspace. There is interpolation processing going on there to take an additive value and convert it into a proxy subtracted from the backlight - and one of the reasons firmware updates can make an LCD monitor's color rendering better.

 

Matter of fact, one thing I learned from this little exchange reading up on the subject is that TN displays can't even physically display true 24-bit color, they dither 6-bit RGB channels into a faux 24-bit gamut. There's tons more back-end fakery with LCD monitors processing images than I thought.

 

So again back to my original point, LCD's subtracting colors with additive colorspaces developed for CRT's some time ago (NTSC is old as dirt) have to do some tricks to make that work - in other words they mishmash colorspaces to physically function. I stand by my original contention.

 

And just for the record I don't hate LCD's, they are great display technology. IPS panel in my 13" rMBP I ordered yesterday I am sure will be quite spectacular when it arrives. But all tech has strengths and weaknesses.


Edited by HAL-9000 - 2/18/13 at 3:37pm
post #48 of 51

I have questions about OLEDs. Are they really better than LED lit LCDs? Well, logically, the fact that OLEDs don't require a backlight is very interesting. The fact that colors are not created by the display by subtracting from the colors inevitably provided by the backlight is also very appealing to me. But, I got to admit that IPhone displays are sweet. However, I think that has more to do with the fact that they have a ppi of 326 vs. my Galaxy S3’s 306. Also, I do have to admit that my screen does look way too green when I watch movies and I don’t think it is due to the images themselves. I think it happens because of the Pen Tile that Samsung uses rather than the RGB that Apple and most other phones use. I think that and RGB OLED screen should be better than an RGB LCD. But I want to be sure of it.

post #49 of 51

I forgot to say that although my friend’s IPhone 5’s screen is really cool, there is something off on it. Something about my Galaxy S3 seems superior and it’s not its clarity or sharpness. I think it’s its OLED screen. The screen on my Galaxy seems to be very even-balanced whereas the IPhone’s seems off at times.

post #50 of 51

This thread about OLED's vs. LCD's has been both interesting and informative, and motivated me to actually take a look at various devices. I work in mobile tech, and have access to a library containing basically every relevant device. So, I compared displays last Friday. Contenders? Galaxy Nexus (OLED), Nexus 4 (LCD), Lumia 920 (OLED), and iPhone 5 (LCD).

 

I compared websites on the devices. My "favorite" common one is CNN, because of the reds they use in their branding. The winner? Windows Phone 8 on the Lumia believe it or not. The Nexus 4 and iPhone 5 are tied for a close second. The distant loser is the Galaxy Nexus. Whatever the display pipeline in a Galaxy Nexus, it leaves a blue tinge on things. But the same OS on the Nexus 4 looks more-or-less as good as an iPhone 5, which is to say exceptional to my subjective perception.

 

But to my surprise, Microsoft/Nokia seems to have done their homework. The Lumia 920 has an accurate gamut and enjoys the contrast and pop inherent to its OLED display. I am not sure about a Galaxy SIII (or a Note II), so I will check those out on Monday.

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I don't get the OLED craze. My iPhone 5's LCD screen rocks.
Deeper blacks man.

iTunes Radio - Apple TV with Wifi AC - Gold Anodized Aluminum iPhone - Mac Pro: September - November 2013

 

Reply

iTunes Radio - Apple TV with Wifi AC - Gold Anodized Aluminum iPhone - Mac Pro: September - November 2013

 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Apple CEO pans OLED displays but stops short of ruling out iPhone with larger screen
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple CEO pans OLED displays but stops short of ruling out iPhone with larger screen