or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Microsoft leaving $2.5 billion per year on the table by holding back Office from iPad
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Microsoft leaving $2.5 billion per year on the table by holding back Office from iPad

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
Microsoft's reluctance to bring its industry-standard Office productivity suite to Apple's iPad may give the software giant a modicum of leverage in the new computing environment, but one analyst says that policy means Microsoft is leaving $2.5 billion a year on the table.

Morgan Stanley's Adam Holt says that, while Microsoft has so far held back from bringing Office to iOS, the ongoing popularity of Apple's mobile operating system may prove too big a draw, especially if Windows RT and Windows 8 tablets continue to underperform in sales. With Surface RT estimated to have sold only between 900,000 and one million units in the fourth quarter of 2012, even improved sales brought on by the Surface Pro are likely to pull Microsoft only to a 10 percent share in the tablet market in 2013, by Holt's estimate.

iOS office
Keeping Office off iOS could be costing Microsoft billions.


Ignoring Apple's iPad, the overwhelming tablet market leader, may give Windows 8 and Windows RT tablets an exclusivity boost Microsoft feels they need, but Holt says that a 30 percent attach rate on the iPad's install base would generate $2.5 billion in additional revenue.

Holt's figures are based on a number of factors that are up for argument. As mentioned before, Holt assumes a 30 percent attach rate among iPad users, due almost solely to the Office name. He justifies this by pointing to the attach rate Office sees on Macs, which is between 30 and 40 percent of the Mac install base. That figure is about three times higher than Office's attach rate on Windows machines, 10 to 15 percent.

Office 365, too, could add to long-term value for Microsoft, were the company to bring it to iOS. Holt, though, believes Microsoft may open up the platform to iOS and Android instead of developing a native app, thereby circumventing the 30 percent cut Apple takes on iOS subscription content.

Holt's analysis paints a difficult choice for Microsoft: abandon the one advantage it has over competitors in the hopes that it will reap more in revenues, or hold on to that advantage and continue on, albeit on a smaller platform.

Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal's Digits blog looks at Microsoft's situation, noting that the company risks sacrificing Office's growth if it insists on "keeping the umbilical cord with Windows intact."

Microsoft's decision, according to WSJ, is similar to one Apple faced when faced with the iPad and iPhone's popularity growing in part at the expense of the Mac. If Microsoft develops Office for iOS and Android, it loses leverage and undercuts the PC ecosystem that has supported the company for so long. If it holds back, it risks Office being usurped by any number of competitors.

Microsoft has been rumored for some time to be prepping a mobile version of its Office suite, but those rumors have yet to materialize. In December, a page on the company's website made mention of Office for iOS, and company representatives have stated as much publicly. The company, though, has yet to make any official announcement.
post #2 of 47
Interesting, a Software company giving priority to hardware over their software. The Office team at MS must be going nuts over this.
post #3 of 47

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

post #4 of 47
I can't blame them. They've invested in the Surface and their Windows products. I agree they are leaving money on the table but if the Surface or Win tablets make it then MS would have made a bad choice. I'm sure few here think it was never possible with over a decade of failure with Windows on tablets but they didn't go to all this trouble without at least hoping for the best.

All they are really giving up right now if their Win-based tablets fail are short term MS Office on iOS sales unless something else can truly replace the MS Office brand, which I don't think is likely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

MS Office is still considered the de facto suite. I wish Apple would add more enterprise level features and market it more but they don't seem to care to much about it.I hope that changes soon.
Edited by SolipsismX - 2/14/13 at 12:30pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #5 of 47
Yeah, but you could just as easily say Microsoft is "leaving money on the table" because all of the stupid things they do.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #6 of 47
Classic Innovators Dilemma (great book). If Ballmer was smart he would look forward and cannibilize the tablet war they are losing and sure to keep losing
post #7 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

 

Wake me up when Pages and Numbers shows up and is a far more capable and extendable set of office needs. iWorks could dominate the office market on OS X and iOS if they were sold as a package set where the power of the iWorks on OS X had a solid 3rd party API to extend services to the likes of Matlab, R, Octave, PostgreSQL, SQLite, Oracle, etc., to embedded services like TeXLive, etc.,.

 

Apple has no requirement to keep iWorks limited but it does.

post #8 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

iWorks is more consumer software, though very good consumer software. There's nothing wrong with that, but I don't think they're really competing squarely against Office. Out of the group, Keynote is most comparable to PowerPoint. I think of Pages more of a page layout program than a word processor like Word. Excel and Numbers are the least comparable in my opinion.

If Microsoft has delusions that Windows 8 tablets can take down the iPad's dominance, then I can understand why they don't offer it. Another is software pricing for iOS software is a bit on the starved side compared to Microsoft's pricing. I don't know if they can offer Excel for iPad for $99 and get traction.
Edited by JeffDM - 2/14/13 at 1:39pm
post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

 

Wake me up when Pages and Numbers shows up and is a far more capable and extendable set of office needs. iWorks could dominate the office market on OS X and iOS if they were sold as a package set where the power of the iWorks on OS X had a solid 3rd party API to extend services to the likes of Matlab, R, Octave, PostgreSQL, SQLite, Oracle, etc., to embedded services like TeXLive, etc.,.

 

Apple has no requirement to keep iWorks limited but it does.

 

I wonder how many people who are really using PostgreSQL within office.  iWorks is a solid and good enough suite for most of us, Office is way too much clutter with unused and duplicated function, even Bill Gate loss is track of Office features.

post #10 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

At least Microsoft bothers to update Office. iWork on the Mac is in a very sorry and neglected state which is a shame because it's good and could have been great.

iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
post #11 of 47

Office on the iPad would speed up enterprise adoption and this may be what MS is so scared off, they're kind of in a damned if I do and damned if I don't rut. Long term though it would be in their interest to release Office onto iOS. At least this way they can keep their main revenue stream going.

iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
post #12 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

 

Others pointed out that MS Office is far more feature-rich, but also consider broken formatting for complex documents. This plagues all MS Office alternatives, and Office is the standard in business.

 

I use iWork for pretty much everything (I do a lot of page layout stuff and Pages is nice to use), but I have a copy of Office just in case I'm worried about compatibility when sharing files.

2011 Macbook Pro, 2012 Macbook Air, iPhone 5, iPad 4

Reply

2011 Macbook Pro, 2012 Macbook Air, iPhone 5, iPad 4

Reply
post #13 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

Because Office is the standard and many companies insist on using it. That's at least partly due to the fact that 99% compatibility may not be good enough.

However, the article misses a major point. It's not $2.5 B at stake - it's the entire Office business. Right now people think "Microsoft Office" for word processing, spreadsheets, etc. The more that people have to evaluate and use alternatives, the less Office becomes a 'must have'. If users find that Pages or something else works well enough for them on the iPad, they may consider it elsewhere, as well.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #14 of 47
Companies worried about paying Apple 30% are silly. It would cost more to make physical copies and distribute, ship and market them and even sales online have support, marketing and transaction cost. That's why so many developers jumped at the chance to develop for IOS
post #15 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvigod View Post

Classic Innovators Dilemma (great book). If Ballmer was smart he would look forward and cannibilize the tablet war they are losing and sure to keep losing

No, it is not so sure they are losing tablet war. It is sure they entered war late. But late-comers are not necessarily loosers, much as history taught us.

Anecdotal as it is, we have recently started showing small Atom based tablets running full Win 8 to our customers, and response is far better than we expected. I'd say it is amazing, but not many people here would believe me. It is, however, very much in line with study AA published here recently, which showed that Win 8 tablets were actually more desired than iOS tablets. This is what we are getting onsite.

And... Why not? For comparable price (for Atom based tablets), you get comparable size, weight and battery life. You get to choose premium, workhorse or cheap plastic look & feel (and save some extra $ if you don't mind plasticky). You get to choose docks, keyboards with or without secondary battery, digitisers or not. And you get full compatibility with work requirements, albeit on slow side of scale.

Much as I played on Atom tablet, Modern UI and apps are silky smooth. Desktop apps are easier to choke tablet - especially if one has habit to open plenty of them - but Office on this still performs much better than Office on RT tablets... and again, it is fully featured. And every other app, service... will work without need to re-invent the wheel.

From IT departments point, it makes sense. These can be managed. Made part of domain. GPs applied. PC remote management agents, like Kaseya, installed.

From users' point, this is less frustrating than using iOS, regardless of how much they might love their iPads. Support is easier to get. And everything works same as on their desktops/laptops, no need to learn new software (or tablet version of the same software).

When you consider all that, it is hardly surprise MS doesn't want to help iOS to grow strong(er) in enterprise. That would be biggest self-backstabbing they could fork out today. Not only to themselves, but also to their partners who depend on MS offering them something that competition cannot claim to have.
post #16 of 47

$2.5B has to be wrong, right?

 

Even at $50/person (for some mix of apps), $2.5B a year implies 50 million people buying Office.   Both of those numbers seem on the high side.  Excel and Word are the big draws.  People might want PowerPoint, but it's such a basic app, I can't see people paying more than $10 for it.

 

And if these are native apps, you're not getting one sale per device or even one sale per person; you're getting on sale per family.  For my Macs I have to license a few copies of Office, and I buy a new copy every few years; but I have Pages running on 3 iPads, 3 iPhones, and a few iPod touches for the 1 $10 I paid years ago.

post #17 of 47
I have two versions of Office on my iPad already. OnLive desktop and CloudOn.

In practice, I'm more likely to view Office documents than edit them (even on my laptop), and iOS can view them natively. But it's nice to have options!

Office on iPad seems like a niche market, though; Office is the kind of thing that plays to the strength of trucks... er, computers. Apple's Numbers on iPad is awesome; for Excel, I want a mouse, keyboard, big screen, chair, and mug of headache remedy.

Doesn't mean the niche wouldn't be profitable!
post #18 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

From IT departments point, it makes sense. These can be managed. Made part of domain. GPs applied. PC remote management agents, like Kaseya, installed.

From users' point, this is less frustrating than using iOS, regardless of how much they might love their iPads. Support is easier to get. And everything works same as on their desktops/laptops, no need to learn new software (or tablet version of the same software).

When you consider all that, it is hardly surprise MS doesn't want to help iOS to grow strong(er) in enterprise. That would be biggest self-backstabbing they could fork out today. Not only to themselves, but also to their partners who depend on MS offering them something that competition cannot claim to have.

 

Good points.  We could very well see a surge in Windows tablets provided by business to their employees.  I don't think that will necessarily hurt iPad sales though.  Locked down tablets for work; personal iPad for home. 

post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landcruiser View Post

Interesting, a Software company giving priority to hardware over their software. The Office team at MS must be going nuts over this.

 

You are correct -- a software company would jump at the chance to put an app suite like Office on the iPad, but Microsoft is now a hardware company. Did you not get Stevie B's memo?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

 

With the increasing number of Fortune 500 companies trying or buying iPads, there is a huge potential for selling Office for iOS to the enterprise.

"You can't fall off the floor"   From 128k Mac to 8GB MBP

Reply

"You can't fall off the floor"   From 128k Mac to 8GB MBP

Reply
post #20 of 47
Typical Microsoft tactics. Wait to release a version of a popular Microsoft product on other platforms to give their own Windows OS a leg up on the competition. More reasons to split Microsoft up.
post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I can't blame them. They've invested in the Surface and their Windows products. I agree they are leaving money on the table but if the Surface or Win tablets make it then MS would have made a bad choice. I'm sure few here think it was never possible with over a decade of failure with Windows on tablets but they didn't go to all this trouble without at least hoping for the best.

All they are really giving up right now if their Win-based tablets fail are short term MS Office on iOS sales unless something else can truly replace the MS Office brand, which I don't think is likely.
MS Office is still considered the de facto suite. I wish Apple would add more enterprise level features and market it more but they don't seem to care to much about it.I hope that changes soon.

The Surface products aren't selling that well.

 

What Enterprise Level features do you want Apple to add and market more?  They've been adding more Enterprise Level features and adding functionality to be on a Windows network.  They offer Exchange Support, don't they?

post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

At least Microsoft bothers to update Office. iWork on the Mac is in a very sorry and neglected state which is a shame because it's good and could have been great.

†hey are working on new versions.  They just have other projects that have taking up more development.  I think we'll see a lot of new releases since they have the OSs under one person rather than splitting them up. I think that's what kind of held them back.


Moving software development under one manager was a good move and then having someone like Ive overseeing hardware and software was also another good move.  I look forward to what will come out as a result, but you can't expect everything to change day later.

post #23 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

$2.5B has to be wrong, right?

Even at $50/person (for some mix of apps), $2.5B a year implies 50 million people buying Office.   Both of those numbers seem on the high side.  Excel and Word are the big draws.  People might want PowerPoint, but it's such a basic app, I can't see people paying more than $10 for it.

I don't think it's that far out of line in terms of total dollars, but I agree that it's too high for annual sales. Apple has sold around 100 M iPads and many times that number of iPhones.

What percentage of PCs have Microsoft Office on them? 80%? 90%? If 30% of iPads and 10% of iPhones were to use Office, they'd hit your number.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #24 of 47

MSFT needs to wake up before it's too late if they want to maintain the dominance of MS Office. Many companies (especially smaller ones) are discovering that Google Docs supports their needs, and it's platform agnostic.

Ballmer & Gates are so tied to the legacy of Windows and Windows programs that they can't see the forest for the trees.

post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

The Surface products aren't selling that well.

What Enterprise Level features do you want Apple to add and market more?  They've been adding more Enterprise Level features and adding functionality to be on a Windows network.  They offer Exchange Support, don't they?

Neither Pages nor Numbers on either OS X or iOS are enterprise level products.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?


People buy it on the Mac. It would probably be a higher concentration of enterprise customers. Whether you choose to acknowledge it, this is one area where MS is firmly entrenched. I suspect it will show up on the iPad at some point.

post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by guaihu View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

Others pointed out that MS Office is far more feature-rich, but also consider broken formatting for complex documents. This plagues all MS Office alternatives, and Office is the standard in business.

I use iWork for pretty much everything (I do a lot of page layout stuff and Pages is nice to use), but I have a copy of Office just in case I'm worried about compatibility when sharing files.

Microsoft cannot even get compatibility working with office Mac and office Windows. I bet they are just still working on it. They do want to try a d take enterprise tablet market share, but office will only go so far. They will also get share for crap windows based business process stuff that will run on pro without conversion. But that just means cheaply software and experience. That will only get them so far. They will need office on iPad more that the exclusivity if windows erodes with PC sales and potentially office.
post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Typical Microsoft tactics. Wait to release a version of a popular Microsoft product on other platforms to give their own Windows OS a leg up on the competition. More reasons to split Microsoft up.
 

Apple makes OS, hardware and office suite. Microsoft makes OS, hardware and office suite.

 

What is the difference?

 

Office suites are becoming less important now days since everyone sends out PDF for the most part. Complex Word documents often have formatting conflicts with various versions of Word, even on Windows, for example Word XP and Word Office 2003 without the compatibility pack. I also don't think Excel power users are as likely to share documents, and if they do, they do so with other power users who have compatible versions. Simpler Excel and Word docs open just fine in Numbers and Pages. PowerPoint and Keynote are problematic though because animations and transitions are not very cross platform compatible and almost all corporate presentations use animation of some sort.

 

If Microsoft offered Office for iOS, a lot of people would buy it just because of the name, not because they really need it. I hardly ever receive Office documents from Windows based clients, at least not as much as I used to a decade ago, but I have a Windows PC on standby in case I can't open them in iWork.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I can't blame them. They've invested in the Surface and their Windows products. I agree they are leaving money on the table but if the Surface or Win tablets make it then MS would have made a bad choice. I'm sure few here think it was never possible with over a decade of failure with Windows on tablets but they didn't go to all this trouble without at least hoping for the best.

All they are really giving up right now if their Win-based tablets fail are short term MS Office on iOS sales unless something else can truly replace the MS Office brand, which I don't think is likely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Who would buy it? Pages, Numbers and Keynote can already read and write Microsoft documents. Why would I spend whatever outrageous price Microsoft would charge when I can get Pages for $10?

MS Office is still considered the de facto suite. I wish Apple would add more enterprise level features and market it more but they don't seem to care to much about it.I hope that changes soon.

 

I think that Apple should enhance and maintain iWork apps (both OS X and iOS) so they:

  • are feature compatible between iOS and OS X
  • maintain file compatibility (export) to MS Office (Windows and Mac versions)
  • maintain the UI UX as is (no ribbon interface and no complex menu bar collections)
  • perform the 20% of function that 80% of Office users use
  • add direct DropBox et al I/O

 

I cannot see any "power Office users" using a tablet to create content -- It would be like carrying fertilizer in the back seat of your Lexus.

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I think that Apple should enhance and maintain iWork apps (both OS X and iOS) so they:
  • are feature compatible between iOS and OS X
  • maintain file compatibility (export) to MS Office (Windows and Mac versions)
  • maintain the UI UX as is (no ribbon interface and no complex menu bar collections)
  • perform the 20% of function that 80% of Office users use
  • add direct DropBox et al I/O

I cannot see any "power Office users" using a tablet to create content -- It would be like carrying fertilizer in the back seat of your Lexus.

I like the list but I'd change the last two to:
  • 99% of what 80% of Office users need
  • iOS APIs that will allow select apps to use Dropbox, SugarSync, or other services to work across App Store apps, unless Apple decides to bring back iDisk (as a modern file sharing resource).

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #31 of 47
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
iOS APIs that will allow select apps to use Dropbox, SugarSync, or other services to work across App Store apps, unless Apple decides to bring back iDisk (as a modern file sharing resource).

 

Oh, I'd love that. I wonder… I wonder what Apple's plan was when they put up a bid for Dropbox… I wonder if we haven't seen that plan, even in part, come to fruition since it didn't happen… 

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #32 of 47

What if MS offered full Office for the iPad (equivalent to Office on the RT)... for say, $60 -- and it didn't sell well? 

 

The Ballmer would pooh his knickers...

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

From IT departments point, it makes sense. These can be managed. Made part of domain. GPs applied. PC remote management agents, like Kaseya, installed.

From users' point, this is less frustrating than using iOS, regardless of how much they might love their iPads. Support is easier to get. And everything works same as on their desktops/laptops, no need to learn new software (or tablet version of the same software).

When you consider all that, it is hardly surprise MS doesn't want to help iOS to grow strong(er) in enterprise. That would be biggest self-backstabbing they could fork out today. Not only to themselves, but also to their partners who depend on MS offering them something that competition cannot claim to have.

 

Good points.  We could very well see a surge in Windows tablets provided by business to their employees.  I don't think that will necessarily hurt iPad sales though.  Locked down tablets for work; personal iPad for home. 

 

It is my understanding that iPads success in enterprise is largely because iPads are being used for things that can't be done on a Laptop or a compromise tablet.

 

With Windows so-called tablets, not only is the hardware compromised... but the OS, UX and apps too -- all so the user can do things he doesn't want or need to do on a tablet.

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

I think that Apple should enhance and maintain iWork apps (both OS X and iOS) so they:

  • are feature compatible between iOS and OS X
  • maintain file compatibility (export) to MS Office (Windows and Mac versions)
  • maintain the UI UX as is (no ribbon interface and no complex menu bar collections)
  • perform the 20% of function that 80% of Office users use
  • add direct DropBox et al I/O

 

I cannot see any "power Office users" using a tablet to create content -- It would be like carrying fertilizer in the back seat of your Lexus.

 

I'd accept even file compatibility, never mind full feature for feature compatibility.

 

I've long used iWork, and AppleWorks before it (since ClarisWorks 2!) Features are fine on the desktop.

 

But iWork document synchronisation with iOS via iCloud is a joke - primarily as the iOS versions are not writing full versions of the documents.  

It's more convenient for me to use Office2 from Byte2 combined with DropBox - a sad state of affairs. 

 

Maybe if Apple had competition from MicroSoft for Office Apps in iOS they might get their act together. Then again, 30% of what MicroSoft would charge (possibly recurringly?) may be more than Apple would make from the iWork Apps. Hardly an incentive.

post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I think that Apple should enhance and maintain iWork apps (both OS X and iOS) so they:
  • are feature compatible between iOS and OS X
  • maintain file compatibility (export) to MS Office (Windows and Mac versions)
  • maintain the UI UX as is (no ribbon interface and no complex menu bar collections)
  • perform the 20% of function that 80% of Office users use
  • add direct DropBox et al I/O

I cannot see any "power Office users" using a tablet to create content -- It would be like carrying fertilizer in the back seat of your Lexus.

I like the list but I'd change the last two to:
  • 99% of what 80% of Office users need
  • iOS APIs that will allow select apps to use Dropbox, SugarSync, or other services to work across App Store apps, unless Apple decides to bring back iDisk (as a modern file sharing resource).

 

Oops... I should of explained that better.   As with most things there's an approximate 80-20 rule -- stores stock inventory based on research that 80% of purchases are satisfied by 20% of the SKUs.  

 

Similarly, I suspect, that the top 20% of Office functions satisfy all (100%) of the needs of 80% of the Office users...

 

In too many years of screwing around with and demonstrating Office features to customers I never even used or understood but a small percentage of the features.

 

Sure, there are Power Office users -- but they are using trucks for the heavy lifting -- and wouldn't even consider a single-window or small screen tablet with limited RAM and file storage.

 

I would ask the question:  What would you use Office for on a tablet?

 

I suspect the answer would be "not very much and not very often".

 

 

Agree with your last suggestion --  Add the APIs to iOS and OSX...

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #36 of 47

May the Blue Bird of Happiness leave a deposit with you and yours.
Reply
May the Blue Bird of Happiness leave a deposit with you and yours.
Reply
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Neither Pages nor Numbers on either OS X or iOS are enterprise level products.

 

Agreed that they are not as full-featured as MS Office, but we are talking about iOS here, not OSX.  Who would realistically be able to utilize all of the complex features and formatting, let alone complex spreadsheets and the like on a 10 inch tablet?  Excel takes a lot of horsepower and memory to churn through files with thousands of formulas and calculations.  Not sure that would work that well on a tablet at least at today's power levels.  If compatibility between the iWork applications and MS Office were improved to preserve formatting better, and iWork were to improve on feature parity a bit, it could fill the need for many tablet users.

post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSteelers View Post

Agreed that they are not as full-featured as MS Office, but we are talking about iOS here, not OSX.  Who would realistically be able to utilize all of the complex features and formatting, let alone complex spreadsheets and the like on a 10 inch tablet?  Excel takes a lot of horsepower and memory to churn through files with thousands of formulas and calculations.  Not sure that would work that well on a tablet at least at today's power levels.  If compatibility between the iWork applications and MS Office were improved to preserve formatting better, and iWork were to improve on feature parity a bit, it could fill the need for many tablet users.

Excellent points. I was hoping someone was going to make that case. As you say, the memory and horsepower can be immense. I think a networked solution that can basically be a shell for large corporate docs might be a great fit.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #39 of 47
MS Office on the RT is terrible. What makes people think that Microsoft can actually make a viable version that works on the iPad. And what is the market for this? I, for one would find using Office on a tablet a terrible experience,
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSteelers View Post

Excel takes a lot of horsepower and memory to churn through files with thousands of formulas and calculations.  Not sure that would work that well on a tablet at least at today's power levels.

Why not? The current iPad has the same horsepower as a desktop did only a few years ago and they ran Excel just fine. MS could very easily streamline Office without losing functionality.
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • Microsoft leaving $2.5 billion per year on the table by holding back Office from iPad
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Microsoft leaving $2.5 billion per year on the table by holding back Office from iPad