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Apple's Sir Jony Ive gets top CBBC accolade, gives a peek into Apple's design facilities - Page 2

post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Aluminium. Now, that's the way to pronounce it.... ;-)

What a GREAT video. The guy's all class. (The kid's impressive too, as are the little designers).

He is very classy isn't he? Love the guy. Re that word ... It's the spelling ... Remember in the USA they spell it 'aluminum' so naturally they say it that way. 1smile.gif Not sure on this one but we probably have to blame that Scotsman Carnegie and his simplification of English project at the beginning of the previous century.
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"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
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post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

He is very classy isn't he? Love the guy. Re that word ... It's the spelling ... Remember in the USA they spell it 'aluminum' so naturally they say it that way. 1smile.gif Not sure on this one but we probably have to blame that Scotsman Carnegie and his simplification of English project at the beginning of the previous century.

Right, this video is worth seeing even if you have to go to your desktop and use Flash to see it.¡

It's a great insight into how one of the world's greatest designers draws from life for his serene aesthetics. It's all about the human touch, which I'm going to say right here is what he gets from his British background, along with the fidgity hardware bits: the well-made ingeniousness that you see everywhere in English manufactures of the last century.

On aluminium vs. aluminum, Solipsism X gave us the last word a few months ago. One can be shown historically to be more logical that the other, but both are correct with regard to usage. Maybe he can repost that. I could look it up if it's still an issue.
post #43 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


On aluminium vs. aluminum, Solipsism X gave us the last word a few months ago. One can be shown historically to be more logical that the other, but both are correct with regard to usage. Maybe he can repost that. I could look it up if it's still an issue.

It's not an issue. I was being tongue-in-cheek. I grew up spelling and pronouncing it with -ium. It was nice to hear that again, that's all.

Now I am used to uh'looo'minuhm.
post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

It's not an issue. I was being tongue-in-cheek. I grew up spelling and pronouncing it with -ium. It was nice to hear that again, that's all.

Now I am used to uh'looo'minuhm.

I know you weren't, but clearly digitalclips was bent on stirring up an international incident, even bringing in the baleful influence of the dour Scot Carnegie on the poor Americans. 1wink.gif

Edit: Thanks to leok at MacRumors here's an iPad friendly-link to the video.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21470637
Edited by Flaneur - 2/16/13 at 8:56pm
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Edit: Thanks to leok at MacRumors here's an iPad friendly-link to the video.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21470637

Thanks for the link; even on my desktop I couldn't watch the video. And I don't understand why AI drops the video in threads in the first place.. Strange thing; your link still needed to connect to macromedia-fcs or something like that...

edit: it wanted to connect to:
a112.ui5g0.akafms.net on port 1935 (macromedia-fcs)
Edited by PhilBoogie - 2/19/13 at 12:20am
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post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

On aluminium vs. aluminum, Solipsism X gave us the last word a few months ago. One can be shown historically to be more logical that the other, but both are correct with regard to usage. Maybe he can repost that. I could look it up if it's still an issue.


aluminum (n.)
1812, coined by English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829), from alumina, name given 18c. to aluminum oxide, from Latin alumen "alum". Davy originally called it alumium (1808), then amended this to aluminum, which remains the U.S. word, but British editors in 1812 further amended it to aluminium, the modern preferred British form, to better harmonize with other metallic element names (sodium, potassium, etc.).

First recorded usage of the British spelling: Aluminium, for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound. ["Quarterly Review," 1812]

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post #47 of 53
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
but British editors in 1812 further amended it to aluminum

….for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word

 

Interesting the long-running effect newspaper editors have had on our language. Usually it comes in the form of shorter words or abbreviations, but this is Britification at its finest. 

post #48 of 53
Someone posted the entir video to YouTube.  These kids ideas are quite good.  Ive's face watching them explain their designs is priceless.
 
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Someone posted the entir video to YouTube.  These kids ideas are quite good.  Ive's face watching them explain their designs is priceless.
 
http://youtu.be/FLUn7xCuQxo

Good find, the director's cut. Thanks for the link.

I believe this shows that Steve, Jony Ive and Apple have moved into new territory in the history of business. They really are making bicycles for the mind. Not ugly pickup trucks or SUVs, but bicycles.
post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


Good find, the director's cut. Thanks for the link.

I believe this shows that Steve, Jony Ive and Apple have moved into new territory in the history of business. They really are making bicycles for the mind. Not ugly pickup trucks or SUVs, but bicycles.

I love the way he says drawing as drawer-ing.  I suppose its a bit like how Brits pronounce the 'a' at the end of word not as 'ah' but as 'er'.  So instead of idea (ide-ah) you get idea (ide-er).  Is this a specific type of accent or very common.  I've heard it said that Ive's accent is Estuary English but I'm not exactly sure what that means (and too lazy to look it up).

post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I love the way he says drawing as drawer-ing.  I suppose its a bit like how Brits pronounce the 'a' at the end of word not as 'ah' but as 'er'.  So instead of idea (ide-ah) you get idea (ide-er).  Is this a specific type of accent or very common.  I've heard it said that Ive's accent is Estuary English but I'm not exactly sure what that means (and too lazy to look it up).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estuary_English

"Estuary English is a dialect of English widely spoken in South East England, especially along the River Thames and its estuary. Phonetician John C. Wells defines Estuary English as "Standard English spoken with the accent of the southeast of England".[1] The name comes from the area around the Thames, particularly its Estuary. Estuary English can be heard in London, Kent, north Surrey and south Essex. Estuary English shares many features with Cockney, and there is some debate among linguists as to where Cockney speech ends and Estuary English begins."

That wikipage details the main characteristics of the dialect but unless you study linguistics I think it'll be hard to fully grasp the description by simply reading about it.

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post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I love the way he says drawing as drawer-ing.  I suppose its a bit like how Brits pronounce the 'a' at the end of word not as 'ah' but as 'er'.  So instead of idea (ide-ah) you get idea (ide-er).  Is this a specific type of accent or very common.  I've heard it said that Ive's accent is Estuary English but I'm not exactly sure what that means (and too lazy to look it up).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estuary_English

"Estuary English is a dialect of English widely spoken in South East England, especially along the River Thames and its estuary. Phonetician John C. Wells defines Estuary English as "Standard English spoken with the accent of the southeast of England".[1] The name comes from the area around the Thames, particularly its Estuary. Estuary English can be heard in London, Kent, north Surrey and south Essex. Estuary English shares many features with Cockney, and there is some debate among linguists as to where Cockney speech ends and Estuary English begins."

That wikipage details the main characteristics of the dialect but unless you study linguistics I think it'll be hard to fully grasp the description by simply reading about it.

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post #53 of 53
That's a nice CNC machine Johnny has there:
http://us.dmg.com/us,milling,dmu

A helmet being made (TopTip: turn sound OFF):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnIvhlKT7SY

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