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Google asks journalists to tone down story of "massive" Google Play security flaw - Page 5

post #161 of 256
What happened to "Do no evil?"
post #162 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


I can almost see "Google Cattle" term emerging in opposition to "Apple Sheep"...

I prefer the alliteration of "Google Goats"!

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

Reply

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

Reply
post #163 of 256
Originally Posted by cjcampbell View Post
What happened to "Do no evil?"

 

Nope. "Don't be evil". HUGE difference. You can do all the evil you want, but as long as you're not evil, it's fine.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #164 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by jameskatt2 View Post


Someone at Google needs to hang.


haha, just like the someone who collected the private wifi data needs to hang. In fact, I bet Schmitty and co are giving the guy a pat on the back for circumventing user's privacy in unique ways.

post #165 of 256

The article states:

 

"Many of the user comments on the issue were found no problem with Google sending users' personal data to developers, with one complaining that the issue was just a matter of unfairly comparing Google with Apple's higher standard for security in the App Store.

 

Developer David Brown wrote, 'Apple hide[s] all of these details because they're control freaks! I have details of every customers I have, whether they paid through PayPal or credit card...does that mean I'll go and harrass [sic] them if they dislike my service?'"

 

Well, let's see, that's a developer comment, not a user comment.  Of course developers want to receive the e-mail addresses of app purchasers!  This is another example of how Google plays fast and loose with disclosure...  It is not 'unfair' at all to compare the privacy and disclosure policies of two competitors - Apple and Google.  That is completely fair and reasonable...

 

Having said that, at the end of the day, users may not care at all about this issue...  People constantly surrender privacy in exchange for convenience...  However, if Google is sincere about living up to its 'do no evil' slogan, then they should be far more transparent about what information they gether from users, and who they share it with...

post #166 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I understand how it can be used that way but I don't think that was the intent of the OP.

I do wish we had a truly gender neutral word to describe a person in the singular that doesn't have a pejorative tone. Perhaps we use the word it to denote an unknown gender but then add as prefixes the first letter of she and he to denote these as possible options. For example, "Shit had a go at me asking whether English was my first language." I see no downsides¡

In that case, "Hit" would be possible option for male.

But this would give a phrase "Shit hit the fan" completely undefined meaning.

On a serious side, I'd probably stick with "One".
post #167 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/156021/google-asks-journalists-to-tone-down-story-of-massive-google-play-security-flaw/120#post_2279329"]

Race intolerance is just dumb, because nobody gets to choose what skin color that they are born with.

I discriminate based on other, more relevant factors, including mobile device choice, religion, political persuasion etc. These are all choices that individuals make and are responsible for.

Stopped reading at "I discriminate". That would be your choice, then. Nothing for me to see there.
post #168 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Yet you follow me so closely. Your cognitive dissonance mention was timely then.

LOL you're hilarious!! Pretty much everything you put on here makes me LOL, all the red herring and all the "white knighting" Google, btw, the only threads, or majority you comment on are for google.  Kind of weird. 

 

 

And "UHHH bonjour" 


Edited by punkndrublic - 2/17/13 at 9:56pm
iMac 2007, Macbook pro 2008, Mac Mini 2011
Reply
iMac 2007, Macbook pro 2008, Mac Mini 2011
Reply
post #169 of 256

Google: proving it's not a bug when it's "a feature".

post #170 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I think you just coined a new term.


Warning: Some Google Cattle posts may contain some horse's ass comments.


I am responding to your comment as I do not see the original poster's comments.


I believe a Gaggle of Googlers is the prefered vernacular.

"gaggle"
gag·gle [gag-uhl] Show IPA verb, gag·gled, gag·gling, noun

verb (used without object)
1. to cackle.

noun
2. an often noisy or disorderly group or gathering: a politician followed by a gaggle of supporters.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English gagelen (v.), gagel (noun); of imitative orig.




Notably, one definition is " an often noisy or disorderly group or gathering" and the origin is gagel (noun); "of imitative orig."

How incredibly appropriate.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 2/17/13 at 9:09pm
post #171 of 256
Google's mission statement is: "Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful." While Google's mission statement alone isn't troublesome, Google's collection of personal information is quite troublesome because Google's business model is the aggregation of user's personal information in order to target advertising to users. As a result of their policies and associated products and services, Google has far more personal information about users than governments or other businesses have about consumers.


* Google gathers details of how you used their services, such as your search queries (1)
* Google tracks cookies that may uniquely identify your browser or your Google Account (1)
* Google collects telephony log information like your phone number, calling-party number, forwarding numbers, time and date of calls, duration of calls, SMS routing information and types of calls (1)
* Google logs device event information such as crashes, system activity, hardware settings, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request and referral URL (1)
* Google collects device-specific information (such as your hardware model, operating system version, unique device identifiers, and mobile network information including phone number) Google may associate your device identifiers or phone number with your Google Account (1)

While such information is gathered by competing products and services, Google's vast range of "products and services" uniquely positions Google to collect more information about consumers than any other company. The problem with Google's vast network of information gathering is that Google has repeatedly demonstrated a lack of concern for consumers through their policies and practices. Furthermore, Google has consistently used very expedient methods to comply with or meet demands whether those of stockholders or governments. The vast amount of information collected by Google has arguably made Google the greatest threat to privacy ever known, a vast unsecured treasure trove of information that attracts hackers and online thieves, and; most worrisome; governments.


* Google has done very little to protect Android users from malware. Considering that many people have significant amounts of personal information on their mobile devices, I find this completely unacceptable.
* According to Sunnyvale, Calif., security firm Juniper Networks known instances of Android-related malware -- "virtually all" involving apps - have jumped steadily month by month from 400 in June 2011 to 15,507 in February 2012 (2)
* "San Francisco-based Lookout Mobile Security reported In August 2011, that "an estimated half-million to one million people were affected by Android malware in the first half of 2011." (2)
* Trend Micro of Japan, which has U.S. headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. - identified "more than 1,000 malicious Android apps" last year, 90 percent of them on Google's site and noted that the number of bad apps grew last year at 60 percent per month. Trend Micro has estimated the total this year "will grow to more than 120,000," (2)
* Google proclaims that "Since the beginning, we’ve focused on providing the best user experience possible. Whether we’re designing a new Internet browser or a new tweak to the look of the homepage, we take great care to ensure that they will ultimately serve you, rather than our own internal goal or bottom line." (3) This is in direct conflict with Google's business model which serves advertisers and is a serious, undisclosed conflict of interest.
* Google removed links to an anti-Scientology site after the Church of Scientology claimed copyright infringement in 2002. (4)
* Google handed over the records of some users of its social-networking service, Orkut, to the Brazilian government, which was investigating alleged racist, homophobic, and pornographic content in September 2006. (4)
* Google's mission statement "to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful" didn’t stop Google from censoring their Chinese search engine to gain access to a lucrative market. (4)
* Privacy International has named Google the worst company in their 2007 survey and "hostile to privacy." (5)
* Google has used their dominant position with Google Search to prefer Google+ search results and has published results that include personal data which doesn't provide an opt-out option. (6)
* Google employees have vandalized OpenStreetMap by adding erroneous data. (7)
* Google collected emails, texts, photos and documents gathered from Wi-Fi networks using Google's StreetView cars to collect data. (8)


1. http://www.google.com/policies/privacy/. Google. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
2. Steve Johnson. Posted March 17, 2012. Updated March 23, 2012. http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_20182226/android-apps-targeted-by-malware?source=rss_viewed. San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
3. http://www.google.com/about/company/philosophy/. Google. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
4. Adam L. Penenberg. October 10, 2006. http://motherjones.com/politics/2006/10/google-evil. MotherJones. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
5. Unattributed. June 8, 2007. https://www.privacyinternational.org/article/race-bottom-privacy-ranking-internet-service-companies. Privacy International. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
6. John Fontana. January 12, 2012 http://www.zdnet.com/blog/identity/ftc-asked-to-probe-google-search-integration/143 ZDNet. Retrieved May 22, 2012.
7. Lucian Parfeni. January 17, 2012. http://news.softpedia.com/news/Google-Accused-of-Vandalizing-OpenStreetMap-Data-246965.shtml Softpedia. Retrieved May 22, 2012.
8. Hack Doyle and Daniel Bates. Posted May 27, 2012. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2150606/Google-deliberately-stole-information-executives-covered-years.html. Daily Mail. Retrieved May 28, 2012.



Android botnet ... (1)
"The past quarter has seen the number of malicious apps double from 10,000 to 20,000 in just one month ..." (2)

"... hundreds of thousands of devices were infected after malware found its way onto the official Google Play marketplace." (2)

"... More worryingly for users, even Google’s official application marketplace, Google Play, was breached, with 17 malicious apps downloaded over 700,000 times before they were spotted and removed from the site..." (2)

"The security firm said at the start of the year, it had found more than 5,000 malicious applications designed to target Google's Android mobile operating system, but the figure has since risen to about 20,000 in recent months. By the coming third-quarter, the firm estimates there will be around 38,000 malware samples, and close to 130,000 in the fourth-quarter." (3)

"... malware targeting Android grew by 3,325 percent in the last seven months of 2011..." (4)




1. Terry Zink. Published 3 July 2012. Spam from an Android botnet. Terry Zink's Cyber Security Blog. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
2. Unattributed. Published 2 July 2012. The True Face of the Android threat. Trend Micro. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
3. Zack Whittaker. Published 4 July 2012. Trend Micro warns of Android malware pandemic by Q4 2012. ZDNet. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
4. Jeffrey Burt. Published 5 July 2012. Android Malware Creates Smartphone Botnet, Researchers Say. eWeek. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
post #172 of 256
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post
Google's mission statement is: "Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful."

 

So release your algorithms. lol.gif

 

Google is Wikipedia if advertisers were in charge. 

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #173 of 256
In short, Google's known practices include:


  • Amending "search algorithms" as necessary to control information flow (Foundem, Onenewspage.com)
  • Capitulating to government calls for private information (Brazil)
  • Caving to Government Censorship (China)
  • Copyright Infringement (book publishing industry, television and motion pictures industry, Oracle)
  • Tailoring search results to prefer Google services (Google+)
  • Vandalizing competing services (OpenStreetMap)


These are just some of the known evil acts of Google.
post #174 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) "It"? Really? If one is not even going to acknowledge Gatorguy as a human being it's hard to imagine how one is even trying to be objective.

2) I feel my ability to debate a topic, which in no small part is being able to see the opposing side's argument, is having had many debates with him over the years. I don't usually come away agreeing with his PoV but I often come away understanding it, even if just a little bit, because of his ability to form a cohesive, well thought-out, and cited response.

You are wrong.
I used it as a gender-neutral phrase.
Anyway questioning whether English is my mother-tongue is far more demeaning.
I don't resort to insults, unless provoked in an extreme manner.
I didn't even retaliate directly to his demeaning statement.
post #175 of 256
Than
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Chromium OS is open-source and I think the licensing would allow you to remove everything that calls home. WIth modern webcode there is no reason why Chrome can't be a stand-alone OS that doesn't need to be connected to the internet and Google's services to work. It has a Linux foundation and getting access to local storage is possible. We've already seen what HTML5/CSS3/JS can do as a UI with WebOS and Windows Metro.

Here is a recent story about how Chrome OS first got started. In a Microsoft-ian fashion Google rejected the idea of a super-fast OS that is loaded into RAM but then later took the idea and ran with it after the original developer was gone.

Thanks for the feedback
post #176 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I sometimes use "it" to refer to a person when I don't know (for sure) their gender. Some people use "they" as a gender-neutral singular pronoun, but "they" is plural. The alternative is to say "that person" or "he/she". Cumbersome. The other, rarer case for using "it" is for anyone whose gender identity is "complicated."
Thanks for the support.
post #177 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

No idea. I only use Chrome on my Windows PC at work because IE sucks really bad, and I don't login to any Google account while I'm using it. As for "my" contacts database, it's actually the company's Exchange database, so they aren't my personal contacts. Besides, other than the browser cookies, whatever Chrome on my work PC tracks can't be used to identify me, only my work PC.

However, on my personal machines (Macs) I don't use Chrome at all. I use Safari for everything and Firefox for a small handful of sites that don't work correctly in Safari.

Thanks. I do like-wise.
IE is terrible, not sure why in a Microsoft-centered universe (at work).
post #178 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, ignoring the fact that his responses aren't usually well cited -- his citations often range to have nothing to do with the topic to actually contradicting his point, if you read them, which he's counting on most people not doing -- his responses are nothing more than spin, deflection, misdirection, and often outright lies. This isn't a debating society, and there's no reason we have to be "fair and balanced". After all, the truth is usually biased, and debating it doesn't change that fact, especially when one side isn't engaged in honest discussion but is here to "shape" the story. 
I agree and may I add, it almost seems he needs to educate us,that we are wrong and only he is right.
I know of one person who fits this description, and they are so sad. This person, that I know will tell his daughter to not eat a particular food, as he dislikes it, an olive actually.
Let your child discover things for themselves!
If one has to constantly resort to citations, in my opinion, it means he cannot structure an argument, or simply is too lazy to do so.
Why he needs to teach us, only he knows.
post #179 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

135 posts bickering about whether Google is more evil than Apple, or vice versa.

Plenty of us really need to go outside more.
So why are you adding to the count?
post #180 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I love that Little Snitch tells me that books.google.com wants to access whatever it thinks it needs on my computer.

I tell it no, every single time, and then in the same session if I want to go to YouTube, the entire website refuses access. I get the Safari load error page.

Hilarious that Google thinks that every single one of their services deserves fingers in all the others.

Yes, a wonderful tool.
I don't use it on my MBA, as I don't use google, except for YouTube.
My son has it installed on his MBP, and it's amazing to see what it does in the background.
post #181 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I understand the emotional connection we have with horses but I don't think it's disgusting. Horse meat is certainly better than you find in hotdogs. If asked if I prefer horse over beef I'd answer "Nah" even without knowing what horse tastes like so I guess I'm not open minded to the idea of equine over bovine and I obviously think it's wrong to deceive the customer, especially when it comes to food, but I wasn't gagging at the thought of eating Seabiscuit on a bun.
I like horse meat, as well as crocodile, emu, snake, eel, as well as the more traditional fare. Try some water buffalo, thick and so tender, a delight to eat.
post #182 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Google's mission statement is: "Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful." While Google's mission statement alone isn't troublesome, Google's collection of personal information is quite troublesome because Google's business model is the aggregation of user's personal information in order to target advertising to users. As a result of their policies and associated products and services, Google has far more personal information about users than governments or other businesses have about consumers.


* Google gathers details of how you used their services, such as your search queries (1)
* Google tracks cookies that may uniquely identify your browser or your Google Account (1)
* Google collects telephony log information like your phone number, calling-party number, forwarding numbers, time and date of calls, duration of calls, SMS routing information and types of calls (1)
* Google logs device event information such as crashes, system activity, hardware settings, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request and referral URL (1)
* Google collects device-specific information (such as your hardware model, operating system version, unique device identifiers, and mobile network information including phone number) Google may associate your device identifiers or phone number with your Google Account (1)

While such information is gathered by competing products and services, Google's vast range of "products and services" uniquely positions Google to collect more information about consumers than any other company. The problem with Google's vast network of information gathering is that Google has repeatedly demonstrated a lack of concern for consumers through their policies and practices. Furthermore, Google has consistently used very expedient methods to comply with or meet demands whether those of stockholders or governments. The vast amount of information collected by Google has arguably made Google the greatest threat to privacy ever known, a vast unsecured treasure trove of information that attracts hackers and online thieves, and; most worrisome; governments.


* Google has done very little to protect Android users from malware. Considering that many people have significant amounts of personal information on their mobile devices, I find this completely unacceptable.
* According to Sunnyvale, Calif., security firm Juniper Networks known instances of Android-related malware -- "virtually all" involving apps - have jumped steadily month by month from 400 in June 2011 to 15,507 in February 2012 (2)
* "San Francisco-based Lookout Mobile Security reported In August 2011, that "an estimated half-million to one million people were affected by Android malware in the first half of 2011." (2)
* Trend Micro of Japan, which has U.S. headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. - identified "more than 1,000 malicious Android apps" last year, 90 percent of them on Google's site and noted that the number of bad apps grew last year at 60 percent per month. Trend Micro has estimated the total this year "will grow to more than 120,000," (2)
* Google proclaims that "Since the beginning, we’ve focused on providing the best user experience possible. Whether we’re designing a new Internet browser or a new tweak to the look of the homepage, we take great care to ensure that they will ultimately serve you, rather than our own internal goal or bottom line." (3) This is in direct conflict with Google's business model which serves advertisers and is a serious, undisclosed conflict of interest.
* Google removed links to an anti-Scientology site after the Church of Scientology claimed copyright infringement in 2002. (4)
* Google handed over the records of some users of its social-networking service, Orkut, to the Brazilian government, which was investigating alleged racist, homophobic, and pornographic content in September 2006. (4)
* Google's mission statement "to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful" didn’t stop Google from censoring their Chinese search engine to gain access to a lucrative market. (4)
* Privacy International has named Google the worst company in their 2007 survey and "hostile to privacy." (5)
* Google has used their dominant position with Google Search to prefer Google+ search results and has published results that include personal data which doesn't provide an opt-out option. (6)
* Google employees have vandalized OpenStreetMap by adding erroneous data. (7)
* Google collected emails, texts, photos and documents gathered from Wi-Fi networks using Google's StreetView cars to collect data. (8)


1. http://www.google.com/policies/privacy/. Google. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
2. Steve Johnson. Posted March 17, 2012. Updated March 23, 2012. http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_20182226/android-apps-targeted-by-malware?source=rss_viewed. San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
3. http://www.google.com/about/company/philosophy/. Google. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
4. Adam L. Penenberg. October 10, 2006. http://motherjones.com/politics/2006/10/google-evil. MotherJones. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
5. Unattributed. June 8, 2007. https://www.privacyinternational.org/article/race-bottom-privacy-ranking-internet-service-companies. Privacy International. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
6. John Fontana. January 12, 2012 http://www.zdnet.com/blog/identity/ftc-asked-to-probe-google-search-integration/143 ZDNet. Retrieved May 22, 2012.
7. Lucian Parfeni. January 17, 2012. http://news.softpedia.com/news/Google-Accused-of-Vandalizing-OpenStreetMap-Data-246965.shtml Softpedia. Retrieved May 22, 2012.
8. Hack Doyle and Daniel Bates. Posted May 27, 2012. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2150606/Google-deliberately-stole-information-executives-covered-years.html. Daily Mail. Retrieved May 28, 2012.



Android botnet ... (1)
"The past quarter has seen the number of malicious apps double from 10,000 to 20,000 in just one month ..." (2)

"... hundreds of thousands of devices were infected after malware found its way onto the official Google Play marketplace." (2)

"... More worryingly for users, even Google’s official application marketplace, Google Play, was breached, with 17 malicious apps downloaded over 700,000 times before they were spotted and removed from the site..." (2)

"The security firm said at the start of the year, it had found more than 5,000 malicious applications designed to target Google's Android mobile operating system, but the figure has since risen to about 20,000 in recent months. By the coming third-quarter, the firm estimates there will be around 38,000 malware samples, and close to 130,000 in the fourth-quarter." (3)

"... malware targeting Android grew by 3,325 percent in the last seven months of 2011..." (4)




1. Terry Zink. Published 3 July 2012. Spam from an Android botnet. Terry Zink's Cyber Security Blog. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
2. Unattributed. Published 2 July 2012. The True Face of the Android threat. Trend Micro. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
3. Zack Whittaker. Published 4 July 2012. Trend Micro warns of Android malware pandemic by Q4 2012. ZDNet. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
4. Jeffrey Burt. Published 5 July 2012. Android Malware Creates Smartphone Botnet, Researchers Say. eWeek. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
I know I shouldn't quote the entire post, but decided it was a must. Excellent research.
Come on Google-apologists what do you say?
post #183 of 256
@iqatedo "Apple has hardware to profit on, Google has... you!" Nice one! And true.
post #184 of 256

Google is way out of line with respect to users privacy. They have never protected customer info and privacy. They make their money by providing info. Google stores to much info about its users. Android is another system which returns Google money through info.

post #185 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I think you just coined a new term.


Warning: Some Google Cattle posts may contain some horse's ass comments.


I am responding to your comment as I do not see the original poster's comments.


I believe a Gaggle of Googlers is the prefered vernacular.

"gaggle"
gag·gle [gag-uhl] Show IPA verb, gag·gled, gag·gling, noun

verb (used without object)
1. to cackle.

noun
2. an often noisy or disorderly group or gathering: a politician followed by a gaggle of supporters.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English gagelen (v.), gagel (noun); of imitative orig.




Notably, one definition is " an often noisy or disorderly group or gathering" and the origin is gagel (noun); "of imitative orig."

How incredibly appropriate.

 

I like the sound of that…

But, I think bugger of Googlers is more appropriate!

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #186 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by hfts View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I sometimes use "it" to refer to a person when I don't know (for sure) their gender. Some people use "they" as a gender-neutral singular pronoun, but "they" is plural. The alternative is to say "that person" or "he/she". Cumbersome. The other, rarer case for using "it" is for anyone whose gender identity is "complicated."
Thanks for the support.

 

Look up the definition of "they".

 

 

they  [they]  
plural pronoun, possessive their or theirs, objective them.
1.
nominative plural of he, she, and it.
2.
people in general: They say he's rich.
3.
(used with an indefinite singular antecedent in place of the definite masculine he  or the definite feminine she  ): Whoever is of voting age, whether they are interested in politics or not, should vote.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #187 of 256

I thought you used "he" when you don't know the gender. It's not always a masculine word.

 

Edit: Oh, apparently I'm not "modern" according to the OS X British dictionary :)

 

he |hiː|pronoun [ third person singular ]used to refer to a man, boy, or male animal previously mentioned or easilyidentified: everyone liked my father—he was the perfect gentleman.• used to refer to a person or animal of unspecified sex (in modern use, now chiefly replaced by ‘he or she’ or ‘they’): see usage note below): every child needs to know that he is loved.• any person (in modern use, now chiefly replaced by ‘anyone’ or ‘the person’: see usage note below): he who is silent consents.• W. Indianhim or his: don't tell he nothing more.

 

Until relatively recently he was used to refer to a person of unspecified sex, as in every child needs to know that he is loved, but this is now generally regarded as old-fashioned or sexist. Since the 18th centurythey has been an alternative to he in this sense ( everyone needs to feel that theymatter), where it occurs after an indefinite pronoun such as everyone orsomeone. It is becoming more and more accepted both in speech and in writing, and is used as the norm in this dictionary. Another alternative is he or she, though this can become tiresomely long-winded when used frequently.

post #188 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

What's tiresome is this binary way of looking at the situation - that you have to be 'pro-Google' or 'pro-Apple', and that there's no room for looking at issues in an unbiased way. It encourages one-sided debates and the stifling of opposing views, neither of which are exactly great things for a discussion forum. ...

 

We'll assume you are relatively new around here, with ~200 posts to your name, even though you signed up almost 2 years ago. Would you like to know what's tiresome? What's tiresome is to have the same Google, Samsung, et al. shills come here and try to spin reality day in and day out. And, yes, we know they are shills. What's tiresome is to have people pretend that the truth is un biased when it isn't. At least on the topic of privacy, anyone trying to equate Apple's behavior with Google's is either being paid to do so, is delusional, or is simply here, at an Apple focused site, to troll. So, you know, it's tiresome to have to wade through that crap. It's tiresome to read endless posts from Google/Android supporters where the truth is injured nearly to the point of death. So, if you feel uncomfortable coming here, because people are trashing your beliefs, maybe the problem is with your beliefs.


Edited by anonymouse - 2/18/13 at 4:21am
post #189 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

We'll assume you are relatively new around here, with ~200 posts to your name, even though you signed up almost 2 years ago. Would you like to know what's tiresome? What's tiresome is to have the same Google, Samsung, et al. shills come here and try to spin reality day in and day out. And, yes, we know they are shills. What's tiresome is to have people pretend that the truth is un biased when it isn't. At least on the topic of privacy, anyone trying to equate Apple's behavior with Google's is either being paid to do so, has no clue about anything, or is simply here, at an Apple focused site, to troll. So, you know, it's tiresome to have to wade through that crap. It's tiresome to read endless posts from Google/Android supporters where the truth is injured nearly to the point of death. So, if you feel uncomfortable coming here, because people are trashing your beliefs, maybe the problem is with your beliefs.

What's tiresome is that for an Apple focused site, they create articles that have nothing to do with Apple, and everything to do with the "competition" being "bad" in order to create circle jerk "debates" where people just talk about how bad everyone else is an how amazing and donowrong Apple is.

post #190 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post

What's tiresome is that for an Apple focused site, they create articles that have nothing to do with Apple, and everything to do with the "competition" being "bad" in order to create circle jerk "debates" where people just talk about how bad everyone else is an how amazing and donowrong Apple is.

 

Well, lately, around here, they post plenty of articles about Apple being bad, too, with the occasional advertisement posing as an article as well.

post #191 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I thought you used "he" when you don't know the gender. It's not always a masculine word.

Edit: Oh, apparently I'm not "modern" according to the OS X British dictionary 1smile.gif

he |hiː
|

pronoun

 [ third person singular ]used to refer to a man, boy, or male animal previously mentioned or easilyidentified: everyone liked my father—he was the perfect gentleman.
• used to refer to a person or animal of unspecified sex (in modern use, now chiefly replaced by ‘he or she’ or ‘they’): see usage note below): every child needs to know that he is loved.
• any person (in modern use, now chiefly replaced by ‘anyone’ or ‘the person’: see usage note below): he who is silent consents.
• W. Indianhim or his: don't tell he nothing more.





Until
 
relatively
 
recently
 
he 
was
 
used to
 refer to a 
person
 
of
 unspecified sex, 
as
 in 
every child needs to know that he is loved
, but this is 
now
 
generally
 
regarded
 as old-fashioned or sexist. Since the 18th century
they 
has been an alternative to 
he 
in this sense (
 everyone needs to feel that theymatter
), where it occurs after an indefinite pronoun such as 
everyone 
or
someone
. It is becoming more and more accepted both in speech and in writing, and is used as the norm in this dictionary. Another alternative is 
he or she
, though this can become tiresomely long-winded when used frequently.




What's up with all the font tags? It makes quoting your text very difficult.

In any event, everything there is grammatically correct. I've also seen "s/he" with growing frequency - it's shorter than "he or she". "It" is not commonly used to designate a person of unknown gender. Colloquially, it is more often used in a derogatory fashion to signify a person whose gender is not apparent.

In any event, it's sort of a silly thing to argue about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

In short, Google's known practices include:


  • Amending "search algorithms" as necessary to control information flow (Foundem, Onenewspage.com)
  • Capitulating to government calls for private information (Brazil)
  • Caving to Government Censorship (China)
  • Copyright Infringement (book publishing industry, television and motion pictures industry, Oracle)
  • Tailoring search results to prefer Google services (Google+)
  • Vandalizing competing services (OpenStreetMap)


These are just some of the known evil acts of Google.

You left off "blatant copying of competitors' technology" (Java, Android)
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #192 of 256

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/5/13 at 3:27pm
post #193 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunks View Post

Google: proving it's not a bug when it's "a feature".


Yeah, which is worse?!?! One would think feature...lol.gif

post #194 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


What's up with all the font tags? It makes quoting your text very difficult.

In any event, everything there is grammatically correct. I've also seen "s/he" with growing frequency - it's shorter than "he or she". "It" is not commonly used to designate a person of unknown gender. Colloquially, it is more often used in a derogatory fashion to signify a person whose gender is not apparent.

In any event, it's sort of a silly thing to argue about.
You left off "blatant copying of competitors' technology" (Java, Android)

 

Its there in the copyright part.... well not if you think about IPR.. which is a another thing than copyright. Oracle seems to consentrate on the copyright part (rather than patent part) because it looks better at prevailing on earlier supreme court decisions...

Oh, ofcourse not to mention the evident apple IPR


Edited by habi - 2/18/13 at 7:23am
post #195 of 256

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/5/13 at 3:27pm
post #196 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post

What's tiresome is that for an Apple focused site, they create articles that have nothing to do with Apple, and everything to do with the "competition" being "bad" in order to create circle jerk "debates" where people just talk about how bad everyone else is an how amazing and donowrong Apple is.

Why not have articles on competitors? Apple doesn't sell things in a vacuum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

It's a cloud OS - how else would you expect it to work?

And since you used Little Snitch, can you tell us specifically what unauthorized sensitive data it was transmitting?

Does it matter? It shouldn't be sending stuff constantly to Google.
post #197 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

It's a cloud OS - how else would you expect it to work?

 

Last I checked, OS X is not a "cloud OS". And, as pointed out, what difference would that make with Chrome trying to upload your Contacts database if you don't even have and aren't even logged into any Google accounts.

 

Chrome is spyware, pure and simple. There is no plausible deniability on this issue.

post #198 of 256

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/5/13 at 3:27pm
post #199 of 256

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 7/5/13 at 3:26pm
post #200 of 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

For most people making claims that might seem potentially libelous, providing supporting details for those claims would indeed matter.

When you use any browser on any OS, data is being sent to the server.  When you have an OS which is essentially a browser, we would expect this to be no different.

So unless you believe that all use of the Internet, characterized as it is by two-way communications between a client and a server, somehow satisfies the definition of "spyware", one may reasonably expect TBell to take an interest in his own words at least sufficient to explain his claims.

Wrong.

http://edrupler.com/content/google-chrome-–-spyware-confirmed
http://www.techgainer.com/google-chrome-browser-may-be-spying-on-all-of-us-really-its-true/
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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