or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Burglar breaks $100K custom glass door with rocks at Boulder Apple Store
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Burglar breaks $100K custom glass door with rocks at Boulder Apple Store

post #1 of 83
Thread Starter 
The damage caused to the glass door in the burglary of a Boulder, Colo., Apple Store was more costly than the goods that were actually stolen.

Three rocks were thrown through the custom-made glass door, which cost nearly $100,000, according to Denver's ABC 7 News. By breaking the glass door, the hooded burglar was able to get away with nearly $64,000 in merchandise, making the damage caused even more costly than the theft.

Boulder
Apple's Boulder store after the recent break-in. Photo courtesy of AppleInsider reader Neal Rogers.

Among the items stolen from the Boulder location were MacBooks, iPads and iPhones. Some of the MacBook Pros stolen are priced at over $2,000.

It's expected that the goods will be sold on the black market, but if Apple can track down the stolen products, Colorado law gives the original owner the right to take back the products, even if the owner did not know the goods were stolen at the time of purchase.

"Smash and grabs" at Apple's retail stores have become something of a trend in recent years, as thieves target the locations for their popular products. In one of the more extreme cases, a burglar crashed into the glass front of a California Apple Store with a BMW X5, causing $600,000 in damage.
post #2 of 83
Cue up all the corny "how many of (insert the name of the competitor you have the most disdain for) products get stolen?"
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #3 of 83
You would think for $100,000 they could have at least made it bullet proof. I wonder if this was a case of someone going, "ooooh, Apple let's jack up the price a little".

I'm not into glass door manufacturing, but even if the manufacturer had four guys worked on the custom door for two straight months, I don't see the fair price being $100,000.
post #4 of 83
And the iPhone? Gorilla glass. Because Apple likes to throw stones.
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
post #5 of 83
Apple is now working on developing transparent steel. 1wink.gif
Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
post #6 of 83

I wonder if Apple has some sort of tracking for the display models. Something more than just "find my phone". It would make sense so they could track the stolen property. Something like lojack for the notebooks and desktops.

That was one expensive breakin....

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply
post #7 of 83
$100k for something this large and thick isn't out of the question but Apple should ask why a couple rocks broke it. It's easy to add layers of lexan to make it a lot harder to break. Apple needs to find a different supplier. Their insurance would probably go down with better glass as well.
post #8 of 83
I thought it was transparent aluminium they were working on.
post #9 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bondr006 View Post

I thought it was transparent aluminium they were working on.

Pardon me, but did you just say aluminium?
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
post #10 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bondr006 View Post

I thought it was transparent aluminium they were working on.

http://rense.com/general20/transparentalum.htm

 

:)

post #11 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Pardon me, but did you just say aluminium?

Yes.  All people who speak proper english spell it aluminium.  Only Americans get mislead by craze idiots...

 

:P :P :P

post #12 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65C816 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by bondr006 View Post

I thought it was transparent aluminium they were working on.
http://rense.com/general20/transparentalum.htm

1smile.gif

LOL: "Slashdot (News for Nerds)"
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65C816 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Pardon me, but did you just say aluminium?
Yes.  All people who speak proper english spell it aluminium.  Only Americans get mislead by craze idiots...

:P :P :P

Tongue in cheek humor; it was a discussion on a recent thread, hence my posting.
Edited by PhilBoogie - 2/18/13 at 7:24am
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
post #13 of 83
ahl-u-min-EE-umm to the fans of Top Gear...
post #14 of 83
Since aluminum wasn't discovered by an Englishman it doesn't really matter does it.
post #15 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65C816 View Post

Yes.  All people who speak proper english spell it aluminium.  Only Americans get mislead by craze idiots...

 

:P :P :P

 

Yes and Steve Jobs, another American mislead by crazed idiots, chuckled every time the 'proper' pronunciation of aluminium was done by Jony Ives.

 

Apple needs to get away from glass and work on "Force Field" doors! 1wink.gif

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

Reply
post #16 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Pardon me, but did you just say aluminium?

 

You mean 

al-u-mini-um ?

post #17 of 83
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post
Since aluminum wasn't discovered by an Englishman it doesn't really matter does it.

 

It matters in the sense that both are correct.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #18 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

 

Yes and Steve Jobs, another American mislead by crazed idiots, chuckled every time the 'proper' pronunciation of aluminium was done by Jony Ives.

 

Apple needs to get away from glass and work on "Force Field" doors! 1wink.gif

Maybe Jobs was the one doing the misleading?  :P

 

A $100k glass door sounds like a prime example of form over function.

post #19 of 83
A
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

Since aluminum wasn't discovered by an Englishman it doesn't really matter does it.

It matters in the sense that both are correct.

It was also named by a very indecisive Englishman.
post #20 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65C816 View Post

Yes.  All people who speak proper english spell it aluminium.  Only Americans get mislead by craze idiots...

:P :P :P

1. The word is misled, not "mislead."

2. Here's Solipsism X's citaion from another thread, source unspecified:


aluminum (n.)
1812, coined by English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829), from alumina, name given 18c. to aluminum oxide, from Latin alumen "alum". Davy originally called it alumium (1808), then amended this to aluminum, which remains the U.S. word, but British editors in 1812 further amended it to aluminium, the modern preferred British form, to better harmonize with other metallic element names (sodium, potassium, etc.).

First recorded usage of the British spelling: Aluminium, for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound. ["Quarterly Review," 1812]


It ain't about proper English. It's about some overreaching journal editors deciding what spelling and pronounciation would be more harmonious with other metals.
post #21 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

Since aluminum wasn't discovered by an Englishman it doesn't really matter does it.

 

Sure it does.  Regardless of who discovered it, it's spelled "Aluminium" and pronounced the same way.  

 

It's not the same as words like "colour" or "organise" which are fairly generic and have been in existence so long they've had time to find alternate spellings.  "Aluminium" is a fairly recent word that has never been spelled any other way in any official capacity.  Therefore spelling it incorrectly, (on the basis of simply a poor pronunciation yet) is "more wrong" than most other mis-spellings.  

 

There are rules to correct pronunciation in English, and scientific words in particular. 

 

Titanium isn't called (or spelled) "Titanum"  

Magnesium isn't called (or spelled) "Magnesum"

Calcium isn't called (or spelled) "Calcum"

 

Not pronouncing and spelling Aluminium correctly is an abomination that any science-y, geek-y sort of person should be ashamed of (American or otherwise).  

post #22 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by bondr006 View Post

I thought it was transparent aluminium they were working on.

Scotty gave the formula away in '86. Why hasn't any been released since?

"Hello, Computer".
post #23 of 83
Sheesh.

Some low-life throws a few rocks in Boulder, Colorado and the end result is me getting educated about the beginnings of the word "aluminium".

Who could have foretold THAT particular chain of events...
If you're going to be original, then you can count on being copied.
Reply
If you're going to be original, then you can count on being copied.
Reply
post #24 of 83
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post
Sure it does.  Regardless of who discovered it, it's spelled "Aluminium" and pronounced the same way.

 

"Davy originally called it aluminum, then amended this to aluminum"


You're completely wrong.

 

Creator says this is the name. It's the name. Just as much as a newspaper in one country invents otherwise.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #25 of 83
Funny that poor Gazoobee has to go into a thicket because he can't see my post quoting Solipsism X, because he has me on his ignore list. Not funny, hilarious. To me, at least.
post #26 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Sure it does.  Regardless of who discovered it, it's spelled "Aluminium" and pronounced the same way.  

It's not the same as words like "colour" or "organise" which are fairly generic and have been in existence so long they've had time to find alternate spellings.  "Aluminium" is a fairly recent word that has never been spelled any other way in any official capacity.  Therefore spelling it incorrectly, (on the basis of simply a poor pronunciation yet) is "more wrong" than most other mis-spellings.  

There are rules to correct pronunciation in English, and scientific words in particular. 

Titanium isn't called (or spelled) "Titanum"  
Magnesium isn't called (or spelled) "Magnesum"
Calcium isn't called (or spelled) "Calcum"

Not pronouncing and spelling Aluminium correctly is an abomination that any science-y, geek-y sort of person should be ashamed of (American or otherwise).  

Check the post prior yours for the history of the spelling.
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #27 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Sheesh.

Some low-life throws a few rocks in Boulder, Colorado and the end result is me getting educated about the beginnings of the word "aluminium".

Who could have foretold THAT particular chain of events...

I most certainly didn't or I would've written, cue up the argument over the spelling of aluminum.
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #28 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang View Post

ahl-u-min-EE-umm to the fans of Top Gear...
Love Top Gear!

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply
post #29 of 83

There is no way that door cost 100k.  Misprint somewhere.

post #30 of 83
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post
There is no way that door cost 100k.  Misprint somewhere.

 

Unfortunately, it could very well be correct. Sort of a Blue Harvest situation with Apple these days.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #31 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Pardon me, but did you just say aluminium?

Scotty gave them the formula back in 1986. On a Mac.
Edit: jungmark beat me to it.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #32 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang View Post

ahl-u-min-EE-umm to the fans of Top Gear...

Man, I love that show. Together with 500M others...
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
Reply
post #33 of 83
Apple is doomed as it was the asteroid (android) from the (Samsung) galaxy attacking the Apple store . Sell all of your AAPL now !!!
post #34 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Apple needs to get away from glass and work on "Force Field" doors! 1wink.gif

Thieves will just use Borg technology to transport through it.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #35 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Sheesh.

Some low-life throws a few rocks in Boulder, Colorado and the end result is me getting educated about the beginnings of the word "aluminium".

Who could have foretold THAT particular chain of events...

Great! Now I want to know the origin of the word chain.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
chain (n.)
c.1300, from Old French chaeine "chain" (12c., Modern French chaîne), from Latin catena "chain" (source also of Spanish cadena, Italian catena), of unknown origin, perhaps from PIE root *kat- "to twist, twine" (cf. Latin cassis "hunting net, snare").

Figurative use from c.1600. As a type of ornament worn about the neck, from late 14c. Chain of stores is American English, 1846. Chain gang is from 1834; chain reaction is from 1916 in physics, specific nuclear physics sense is from 1938; chain mail first recorded 1822, in Scott, from mail (n.2). Before that, mail alone sufficed. Chain letter recorded from 1892; usually to raise money at first; decried from the start as a nuisance.

Nine out of every ten givers are reluctant and unwilling, and are coerced into giving through the awful fear of "breaking the chain," so that the spirit of charity is woefully absent. ["St. Nicholas" magazine, vol. XXVI, April 1899]

Chain smoker is attested from 1886, originally of Bismarck (who smoked cigars), thus probably a loan-translation of German Kettenraucher. Chain-smoking is from 1930.

I had no idea that the figurative to mean a string of sequences is about 500 years old and that chain letters started before the 20th century. These always seemed like more modern usage.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #36 of 83
How come nobody ever breaks into the Microsoft store? They are starting to feel left out.
post #37 of 83

Hey burglars: next time, steal the door very carefully so as not to damage it, then hold it for ransom.  Easy $100K, no electronics to fence, and Greenpeace will pressure Apple into paying.  Because buying back the existing door would be far more energy-efficient than re-glazing a replacement door.  Vastly smaller carbon footprint too.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #38 of 83
Originally Posted by NUKEM52 View Post

How come nobody ever breaks into the Microsoft store? They are starting to feel left out.

 

There are several solutions to Microsoft's "so quiet you can hear a pin drop" retail store problem.

 

1. Staged thefts: Microsoft employees can "break in" and steal racks of shrink-wrapped software and demo PCs.

Unsold inventory reduced (slightly.)

 

2. Free tickets to Selena Gomez and Joe Jonas concerts.  If you buy $100 in Microsoft merchandise first.

At least the store(s) woudn't be mausoleum-quiet for an hour.

 

3. Arson.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #39 of 83
Why not use laminated glass like used in automotive windshields? It may not stop a car going through it but it will certainly stop rocks and clumsy thieves from getting in. Am I missing something?
post #40 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Sure it does.  Regardless of who discovered it, it's spelled "Aluminium" and pronounced the same way.  

It's not the same as words like "colour" or "organise" which are fairly generic and have been in existence so long they've had time to find alternate spellings.  "Aluminium" is a fairly recent word that has never been spelled any other way in any official capacity.  Therefore spelling it incorrectly, (on the basis of simply a poor pronunciation yet) is "more wrong" than most other mis-spellings.  

There are rules to correct pronunciation in English, and scientific words in particular. 

Titanium isn't called (or spelled) "Titanum"  
Magnesium isn't called (or spelled) "Magnesum"
Calcium isn't called (or spelled) "Calcum"

Not pronouncing and spelling Aluminium correctly is an abomination that any science-y, geek-y sort of person should be ashamed of (American or otherwise).  

First of all, whomever discovers something often gets to name it. That's about as much as a rule as all metals need to end in -ium. It's commonplace and happens enough times that one should expect that cause and effect relationship but it's not a rule. You are not an idiot for saying aluminum as this 1) the name given by Davy, and 2) accepted by the US and other countries. In fact, any real scientist in the UK will accept aluminum as acceptable even if they prefer aluminium.

These are simply variations in languages and it's the UK theychanged it after the fact, which is not a problem as that is how language works but it's certainly not because it was wrong. You can't have a wrong word if you invent it as all words are made up.

If you really want to deny the history of the word and adhere to a rule-of-thumb as a hard and fast decree then what about the metals: tin, gold, iron silver, mercury, etc.? Why aren't you demanding these only be referred to as stannium from the Latin stannum, aurium from the Latin aurum, ferrium from the Latin ferrum, argentium from the Latin argentum, hydrargyrium from the Latin hydrargyrum, respectively.

Note that I choose metals whose names are not using your rule but have the Latin 2-letter symbols that call forth the original Latin word that already ends in -um and therefore could have easily been changed to -ium if this were a scientific edict. Do you not allow people to say tin, gold, iron, silver, mercury, et al.? I would doubt it.

This has been an episode of Etymchemology with SolipsismX.


PS: As an American who has spent considerable time in the UK I use aluminium and other British spellings and pronunciation. I quite prefer the way aluminium sounds over aluminum but my preference in no way dictates what is considered correct for all.
Edited by SolipsismX - 2/18/13 at 9:43am

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Burglar breaks $100K custom glass door with rocks at Boulder Apple Store