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Apple TV launches in India for Rs. 7,900

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Almost a year after the device launched in the U.S., Apple has brought its newest Apple TV to India, and the company is currently looking to develop partnerships to stream content directly to TVs through the device.

Apple TV India


ThinkDigit carried the news on Tuesday that the new Apple TV had appeared in Apple's Indian online store. An Apple India representative speaking with that publication stated that Apple is currently looking to partner with Indian content providers in order to bring content streaming services to its diminutive set-top box, bringing Indian customers access to services similar to Netflix and Hulu Plus.

Apple's streaming box retails for Rs. 7,900, or roughly $146. It competes with numerous other HD media players available on the Indian market, including Asus' O! Play Mini, Amkette's Flash TV HD, and the WD Live HD. ThinkDigit notes, though, that the media player segment has yet to achieve critical mass in the Indian market, so Apple may be able to have a big impact.

Apple has, over the last three months, seen sales shoot up 400 percent in India following an extensive advertising and marketing campaign. That aggressive approach to the Indian market came after years of Apple largely ignoring India, where smartphone penetration is thought to be less than 10 percent.

Apple launched its iTunes Music Store in the world's second most populous country this past December. The iTunes Store launched with local artists, such as AR Rahman, as well as U.S acts.
post #2 of 38
Truly becoming a global company. With iTunes added to so many countries, slowly expanding the offerings (books, movies, TV, App Store etc) the Apple name will become known to every living person on the planet.

Take a look at the movies section on the Store, funny editing they do. Perhaps digitalclips likes to see that.
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post #3 of 38
Pretty smart
post #4 of 38
Apple should stop going after market share with this. The Apple TV is already a cheap peice of plastic unbecoming of Apple's quality standards. Why don't they improve the quality standards, profit margins, market strictly to the wealthy, and stop competing with Roku and the other cheap market-share seeking manufacturers? Why does Apple need market share? They have superiority, niche marketing and inflated margins. Who needs anything else?

/s

EDIT, BY TALLEST SKIL: Edited for visibility. Even I missed it the first time. lol.gif
post #5 of 38

The AppleTV is a great device and it's secret is in AirPlay. If you have an iPhone or iPad, this is an amazing ability to stream ANYTHING to your TV near instantly. It's a quality unit and works great (as long as you have an Internet connection that can support HD streaming of course)

post #6 of 38
This is about 50% more than the US Apple TV cost which, from my experiences in India, makes it a pretty good price for the Indian market. I've seen Macs at more than double what they cost in the US, sometimes not even the latest models.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post

The AppleTV is a great device and it's secret is in AirPlay. If you have an iPhone or iPad, this is an amazing ability to stream ANYTHING to your TV near instantly. It's a quality unit and works great (as long as you have an Internet connection that can support HD streaming of course)

They really need to advertise AirPlay better.

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post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


They really need to advertise AirPlay better.

That, and they need to drop the WiFi AP requirement. Simply allow anyone within x feet radius to stream to your AppleTV, without password and all that crap. Toggle a setting in your AppleTV for all I care.
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post #8 of 38
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Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That, and they need to drop the WiFi AP requirement. Simply allow anyone within x feet radius to stream to your AppleTV, without password and all that crap. Toggle a setting in your AppleTV for all I care.

Macs have that AirDrop feature which creates an ad-hoc WiFi network between two devices without detaching you from the regular WiFi. I tried this when it first arrived and it was considerably slower than going though the router. Would this be faster enough to stream HD? Are the WiFi radios in iDevices close to being capable of this feature?

I doubt that Apple would include the option to create a standard ad-hoc network between an Apple TV and iDevice even though this could make classroom and boardroom use much simpler.

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post #9 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

This is about 50% more than the US Apple TV cost which, from my experiences in India, makes it a pretty good price for the Indian market. I've seen Macs at more than double what they cost in the US, sometimes not even the latest models.

I know what you are saying that compared to current prices it might be good to be only 50% more. But compared to what an average Indian earns, that makes Apple prohibitively expensive. Most of those who can afford this price are probably those that travel overseas anyway and can pick up cheaper deals in other countries. If anything, the price must be less in India.

post #10 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

I know what you are saying that compared to current prices it might be good to be only 50% more. But compared to what an average Indian earns, that makes Apple prohibitively expensive. Most of those who can afford this price are probably those that travel overseas anyway and can pick up cheaper deals in other countries. If anything, the price must be less in India.

But if it was $99 it wouldn't be? 1confused.gif

China and India have an overwhelmingly high rate of poverty but that doesn't mean that everyone is poor. They so many people that even at a small percentage there are plenty of people Apple can appeal to in these countries. You also have to take into effect disposable income, not how much one makes. If you make $30k a year in the US you probably have less disposable income than someone who makes $20k year in India.

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post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

If anything, the price must be less in India.

But if they have different prices compared to other countries won't 'everyone' go to the cheapest country to buy Apple products? Many steer away from the Italian iPhone for that very reason, and I think it's better to have one price covers the globe approach.


Euro = 1.34 USD, so $977 / $1125 / $1272 for the iPhone5 then.
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post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That, and they need to drop the WiFi AP requirement. Simply allow anyone within x feet radius to stream to your AppleTV, without password and all that crap. Toggle a setting in your AppleTV for all I care.

Macs have that AirDrop feature which creates an ad-hoc WiFi network between two devices without detaching you from the regular WiFi. I tried this when it first arrived and it was considerably slower than going though the router. Would this be faster enough to stream HD?

Well, seems to me if you take out the AP it would be faster, especially if iOS device and AppleTV are closer to each other than both having to go through an AP which would be further away.
Quote:
Are the WiFi radios in iDevices close to being capable of this feature?

Yes, many people get the iPad sans cellular because they can create a personal hotspot over WiFi from their iPhone
Quote:
I doubt that Apple would include the option to create a standard ad-hoc network between an Apple TV and iDevice even though this could make classroom and boardroom use much simpler.

It's already is on the iPhone; they need to enable this on the AppleTV. A simply option to allow for ad-hoc connection to a iOS device is all it takes.

That said, I was downloading a large amount of data over my home WiFi (Top Gear torrent) and the music streaming over Airplay from my iPad kept dropping. Maybe the should add bluetooth to the AppleTV, though I don't know what battery life will be like on your iOS device.
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post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


But if it was $99 it wouldn't be? 1confused.gif

China and India have an overwhelmingly high rate of poverty but that doesn't mean that everyone is poor. They so many people that even at a small percentage there are plenty of people Apple can appeal to in these countries. You also have to take into effect disposable income, not how much one makes. If you make $30k a year in the US you probably have less disposable income than someone who makes $20k year in India.

Even so, that does not justify the higher price in India. 

 

Also what you are saying is just to reserve Apple products for the rich. I don't believe that is Apple's philosophy - hasn't it always been computers for the rest of us?

 

Basically I'm arguing for at least price parity, but if there are different prices in different countries, at least it should be less in poor countries....

 

otherwise.....

 

poor countries are subsidising rich Americans.

post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

Even so, that does not justify the higher price in India. 

Also what you are saying is just to reserve Apple products for the rich. I don't believe that is Apple's philosophy - hasn't it always been computers for the rest of us?

Basically I'm arguing for at least price parity, but if there are different prices in different countries, at least it should be less in poor countries....

otherwise.....

poor countries are subsidising rich Americans.

What? First you argued that Indians can't afford $150 and now you're saying Apple is raping Indians in favor of the US market. Gets your arguments straight.

You think Apple is just jacking up the price so they can stick it to Indians so Americans can get a break? Seriously, WTF?! There are costs you simply aren't considering with your odd stand again Apple selling the Apple TV in India.

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post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


But if they have different prices compared to other countries won't 'everyone' go to the cheapest country to buy Apple products?
 

Since they have different prices, then people ARE going to different countries to get the cheapest.

 

Again, it really looks like poor countries are made to pay extra so Americans can have things cheap. Why should the poor of India subsidise rich Americans?

 

The Italian case might be due to taxes, but I don't think there is much goods tax in India.

post #16 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

Why should the poor of India subsidise rich Americans?

Why should a device that sells a fraction of the units in one county and therefore has less economics of scale when you include the PSU, labeling, licensing, standards testing, etc. cost more than a country that sells a lot more of the same units? Why should a country that has less tariffs for selling local goods than a country that taxes heavily products from foreign nations?

I'm starting to think you actually believe Americans are getting a discount on Apple products. 1oyvey.gif

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post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Why should a device that sells a fraction of the units in one county and therefore has less economics of scale when you include the PSU, labeling, licensing, standards testing, etc. cost more than a country that sells a lot more of the same units? Why should a country that has less tariffs for selling local goods than a country that taxes heavily products from foreign nations?

I'm starting to think you actually believe Americans are getting a discount on Apple products. 1oyvey.gif

Oh, I don't believe anything - I'm posing the question. What is the base price in India before taxes, etc? Recently, Apple, Adobe, and Microsoft were questioned why their software and services are more expensive in Australia than in the US - typically 50% more, sometimes up to 4x more.

 

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology-news/adobe-cuts-prices-but-still-draws-flak-20130213-2ec9g.html

 

Stay tuned...

 

I think Apple's response was reasonable in that they said the publishing houses (for iTunes store) set the rates in different countries. For app store developers set the rates (which I think is pretty much global).

 

If that is the case for Apple in India then good - I'd like to think Apple is doing the right thing because it thinks different.

 

However, for many products the US pays less while the rest of the world pays more (irrespective of taxes, distribution costs, etc). So the rest of the world DOES subsidize the US. It's a natural part of the market for any company - work out how to attach you money syphon into the system and suck as hard as you can. Although it's a natural part of being the largest market, it is not necessarily right. What I'm saying is the questions are being asked, the price differences are being noticed and in a global market, any price gouging must stop where it is found to occur.

post #18 of 38
Unbelievable. 1oyvey.gif

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post #19 of 38
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

So the rest of the world DOES subsidize the US.

 

Again, no.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Unbelievable. 1oyvey.gif

Well, it doesn't matter what you or I believe. What matters is the truth.

post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Again, no.

What don't you understand about the concept?

 

If customer A is paying more for a product than customer B, customer A is effectively subsidising customer B. Or to put it another way, the vendor is taking money from customer A and giving it to customer B. That is happening on a worldwide basis.

post #22 of 38
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post
What matters is the truth.

 

Good! Then maybe tell some?


Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post
If customer A is paying more for a product than customer B, customer A is effectively subsidising customer B.

 

Or perhaps customer B lives where the laws are different, the taxes are different, the regulations are different, the cost of living is different, the imports are different, the building codes are different, the manufacturing regulations are different and all of this adds up to cost more.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

Well, it doesn't matter what you or I believe. What matters is the truth.

Not to you apparently as you keep ignoring the truth and then making false claims.

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post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Good! Then maybe tell some?

 

Or perhaps customer B lives where the laws are different, the taxes are different, the regulations are different, the cost of living is different, the imports are different, the building codes are different, the manufacturing regulations are different and all of this adds up to cost more.

I agree. What I am saying is that after these factor are taken into account there is still a price difference in the base price. That is the truth I am trying to get at. Because these pricing structures are complex it means that price discrimination is hidden, and so it is too easy to make this argument that since there is extra tax, all the price difference is due only to tax, but there still is a markup on the base price. This does happen in many products. The US is being subsidised by the rest of the world. This is changing as people are becoming aware of this. It will actually be a healthy change and I'm sure companies like Apple will do even better.

post #25 of 38
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post
What I am saying is that after these factor are taken into account there is still a price difference in the base price.


Okay, how can you possibly know that?


The US is being subsidised by the rest of the world.

 

No, repeating it doesn't make it true.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Okay, how can you possibly know that?

 

No, repeating it doesn't make it true.

Denial does not make it false. I'm not claiming to be an expert. In fact I only posed the questions to begin with. As I have said, it is complex to understand what is going on. As is typical with marketing they try to make things complex so that consumers are at a disadvantage. Denialists will hide behind this complexity.

 

 

How it works

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_discrimination#International_price_discrimination

 

Examples in software:

 

http://www.smartcompany.com.au/start-up/050983-revealed-how-it-price-discrimination-costs-australian-smes.html

http://www.choice.com.au/media-and-news/media-releases/2012-media-releases/time-for-tech-giants-to-face-the-music-on-international-price-discrimination.aspx

 

Oil discrimination:

 

http://www.iaee.org/documents/washington/Ron_Soligo.pdf

 

This shows that Asian countries are (or were) at a major disadvantage compared to the US. Oil market experts may be able to say that this Saudi oil price discrimination has been stopped, but in effect it means the the rest of the world is or was subsidising cheap fuel in the USA.

post #27 of 38
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post
Denial does not make it false.

 

"Innocent until proven guilty". You don't have any evidence. It isn't the case.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

I know what you are saying that compared to current prices it might be good to be only 50% more. But compared to what an average Indian earns, that makes Apple prohibitively expensive. Most of those who can afford this price are probably those that travel overseas anyway and can pick up cheaper deals in other countries. If anything, the price must be less in India.

Apple is already expensive. They are making premium products. Their market strategy is very different & meant to stay in premium segment. Let's look at the most popular, highly anticipated iPhone 5 in India. Currently it's available in US for $649 for contract-free 16 GB version. And with addition of tax $49 approx, let's say it costs $699. So that's almost 38k INR while 16 GB iPhone 5 is available in India at 45k INR contract-free.

 

So the difference you see comes from the factors which are already mentioned by other members. It's not a huge margin considering the licensing, taxes, shipping & whatever other additional cost we have to bear. In India especially for iPhone Apple's premium resellers do not provide warranty for units purchased outside of India. While for all other Apple products, no matter where they are purchased anywhere in the world fall under warranty & replacements. 

 

Your logic of rich & poor country doesn't make sense. Apple's not there for charity but for business. And I like them for what they are. While Samsung & other android OEMs, I remember when they announced Galaxy S III worldwide, they announced it in India for 38k INR and as of now, not ever after a year they are offering 16 GB S III in 29k. It's always same for most of their products. At least Apple's not changing the price of the product from start to end cycle. Not often. 

post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

"Innocent until proven guilty". You don't have any evidence. It isn't the case.

You obviously didn't bother to read those pages. You are denying the evidence with providing no fresh evidence of your own.

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hari5 View Post

Apple is already expensive. They are making premium products. Their market strategy is very different & meant to stay in premium segment. Let's look at the most popular, highly anticipated iPhone 5 in India. Currently it's available in US for $649 for contract-free 16 GB version. And with addition of tax $49 approx, let's say it costs $699. So that's almost 38k INR while 16 GB iPhone 5 is available in India at 45k INR contract-free.

 

So the difference you see comes from the factors which are already mentioned by other members. It's not a huge margin considering the licensing, taxes, shipping & whatever other additional cost we have to bear. In India especially for iPhone Apple's premium resellers do not provide warranty for units purchased outside of India. While for all other Apple products, no matter where they are purchased anywhere in the world fall under warranty & replacements. 

 

Your logic of rich & poor country doesn't make sense. Apple's not there for charity but for business. And I like them for what they are. While Samsung & other android OEMs, I remember when they announced Galaxy S III worldwide, they announced it in India for 38k INR and as of now, not ever after a year they are offering 16 GB S III in 29k. It's always same for most of their products. At least Apple's not changing the price of the product from start to end cycle. Not often. 

Namaste Hari,

 

I agree with most of what you say. Certainly, Apple set a price and then keep it at that level and that is a good thing. It gives consumers some certainty, while others are giving "discounts" here there and everywhere (they're not really discounts are they!). That is typical marketing confusing the consumer. Yes, Apple certainly is better in that regard.

 

The original point of Salopsism was that only 50% more was a good price for India s/he had seen double the price. I don't think taxes would account for that, and as far as transport/distribution/support costs go, they would be significantly less in India - so that suggests that since these costs are less in a poor country, so should the price be.

 

I don't know the reasons the warranty for Apple products purchased outside India is invalid and thus forcing people to buy locally at inflated prices (although not much goes wrong with Apple products, so it might be worth the risk).

 

I think we are on the same wavelength that we would like to see Apple do well. I think they will find a balance, probably better than any other company. Markets like India and China are coming up and rivalling the US in size which means the US does not have the bargaining power to get lower prices, disadvantaging the rest of the world. This idea seems to scare Americans - some posting here. But we need to get rid of this notion that for one to win the other must lose - we do best when everyone wins.

post #31 of 38
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post
You obviously didn't bother to read those pages. You are denying the evidence…

 

That's right; because they don't have any.

 

"We can't find any reason; it's obviously price discrimination." They didn't explain squat about what they DID research, if anything, what they DID discount and why, if anything, and why the valid, known reasons for having the price higher were also discounted.

 

Show me an analysis like that. 

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That's right; because they don't have any.

"We can't find any reason; it's obviously price discrimination." They didn't explain squat about what they DID research, if anything, what they DID discount and why, if anything, and why the valid, known reasons for having the price higher were also discounted.

Show me an analysis like that. 

He failed to acknowledge any potential regulation combined with changes in supply and demand, economies of scale and volume discounts, regulated versus unregulated markets, variations in demand and supply, the degree of competition in the local area, varying production costs, differences in transportation costs, differences in distribution costs, differences in transportation costs, and potential excise taxes on foreign goods.

I learned about this stuff in my HS economics class as I thought most people did.

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post #33 of 38
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
I learned about this stuff in my HS economics class as I thought most people did.

 

Mine was an elective class and called 'Entrepreneurship'. It was full, sure, but I don't remember many people having interest therein. That might be why.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Mine was an elective class and called 'Entrepreneurship'. It was full, sure, but I don't remember many people having interest therein. That might be why.

That's a good point. Mine was mandatory but it's not accurate for me to assume that all school systems operate the same way. That said, it's also not accurate for someone to have absolutely no knowledge of economics to claim that Apple is raping Indians so they can give discounts to Americans. The fact is if Apple pulled out of India completely the price of the iPhone would not change in the US. Simply put, prices are determined by costs to sell, which is higher in India, and what the market will bear.


When I was there I remember the Nokia and Sony stores (they had official stores, or at least official looking stores) the products converted to nearly double the US price and UK prices. In fact, despite how inexpensive most of India is everything I wanted as an American was considerably more expensive than the US. Brazil is even worse when it comes to electronics but at least food and lodging wasn't outrageous for satisfying my American tastes.

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post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


That said, it's also not accurate for someone to have absolutely no knowledge of economics to claim that Apple is raping Indians so they can give discounts to Americans. 

So who said that? Not me. You and Mr Skil seemed to have been misreading my position and arguing against that. And 'raping' Indians? You should steer clear of emotive language. I didn't say that's what Apple is doing, but pointing out there has been a practice of the US getting lower prices on things like oil from Saudi Arabia. The economics is that money therefore flows from the third world to the US. This was done by the British empire before hand. And who here has 'no knowledge of economics'. Although economics is a notoriously imprecise practise, but they probably didn't teach you that in your high school economics class. Economics has many assumptions that can be challenged. And usually an HS level understanding of any subject (subjects that are more solid than economics) has to be taken to pieces at a tertiary level because things taught as fact usually aren't so.

 

When people are told that their school understandings of subjects are at best simplistic or often wrong, they usually react with strong protestations.

post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

The original point of SolipsismX* was that only 50% more was a good price for India s/he had seen double the price. I don't think taxes would account for that, and as far as transport/distribution/support costs go, they would be significantly less in India - so that suggests that since these costs are less in a poor country, so should the price be.

Namaste 

 

Sorry but I don't agree at all with your reasoning. Back in 2012 I remember reading the similar article regarding Tim's thoughts on smartphone market dynamics in India & difficulties Apple was facing in distribution. So I googled the article. 

 

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-07-26/strategy/32868313_1_india-apple-ceo-tim-cook-smartphone-market

 

He accentuated fairly on business structure & multi-layered distribution channels of India and it should answer all your arguments. 

 

*I edited your quote because guy's a legend here. And I just didn't like the wrong spell of his name. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

I don't know the reasons the warranty for Apple products purchased outside India is invalid and thus forcing people to buy locally at inflated prices (although not much goes wrong with Apple products, so it might be worth the risk).

 

You misunderstood this portion of my post. Pardon my English. In India there's no warranty only for iPhone purchased out of India while all other products such as MAC, iPod, iPad etc fall under Apple limited warranty in India regardless of where they are purchased. I had bought 4th gen iPod touch from Apple online store on 2010's Black Friday. Received it in SF, CA. Then had some problem with dock connector. I went to Apple authorized service center in Ahmedabad & they replaced my unit without a fuss.

 

Apple India has never confirmed but I think the reason behind providing no warranty for iPhone purchased out of India is simply because many people are buying jailbroken/unlocked iPhones from other countries on reduced cost & using it in India.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

I think we are on the same wavelength that we would like to see Apple do well. I think they will find a balance, probably better than any other company. Markets like India and China are coming up and rivalling the US in size which means the US does not have the bargaining power to get lower prices, disadvantaging the rest of the world. This idea seems to scare Americans - some posting here. But we need to get rid of this notion that for one to win the other must lose - we do best when everyone wins.

 

Again wrong. There's no such notion in the minds of any Americans posting here. Nobody's scared. You have the false impression. The below is an interesting article. Please have a look.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/bb10-launches-in-india-as-apple-makes-aggressive-push/article9017910/

 

It's regarding the BB10 launches in India as Apple's making aggressive push in our country for smartphone market share. Here's a snippet.

Quote:
Apple Inc is now aggressively pushing the iconic device through instalment payment plans that make it more affordable, a new distribution model and heavy marketing blitz.
 
“Now your dream phone” at 5,056 rupees ($93 U.S.), read a recent full front-page ad for an iPhone 5 in the Times of India, referring to the initial payment on a phone priced at $840, or almost two months’ wages for an entry-level software engineer.
 
Apple expanded its India sales effort in the latter half of 2012 by adding two distributors. Previously it sold iPhones only through a few carriers and stores it calls premium resellers.
 

The result: iPhone shipments to India between October and December nearly tripled to 250,000 units from 90,000 in the previous quarter, according to an estimate by Jessica Kwee, a Singapore-based analyst at consultancy Canalys.

Until last year, BlackBerry was the No. 3 smartphone brand in India with market share of more than 10 per cent, thanks to a push into the consumer segment with lower-priced phones. Last quarter its share fell to about 5 per cent, putting it in fifth place, according to Canalys. Apple was sixth.

post #37 of 38
Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post
So who said that? Not me. You and Mr Skil seemed to have been misreading my position and arguing against that.

 

Your position is that the United States gets a "discount" on products, and that the various costs of doing business internationally combined with the costs to do business in a specific country should either be disregarded or cannot result in the prices seen.

 

Unfortunately, you've not said why these costs should be disregarded or discounted as the reason for the discrepancy. You have, however, said this:

 


Originally Posted by ijoyner View Post

The original point of Salopsism was that only 50% more was a good price for India s/he had seen double the price. I don't think taxes would account for that

 

And yet they do, for example, in Brazil. So why would this not be the case elsewhere?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Your position is that the United States gets a "discount" on products and that the various costs of doing business internationally combined with the costs to do business in a specific country should either be disregarded or cannot result in the prices seen.

 

Unfortunately, you've not said why these costs should be disregarded or discounted as the reason for the discrepancy. You have, however, said this:

 

 

And yet they do, for example, in Brazil. So why would this not be the case elsewhere?

I'm not really saying a 'conscious' discount, but where the US is able to negotiate lower prices because of the size of the market, it effectively means money flows from smaller markets to the larger market. Thus Thailand can't match the bargaining power of the US. This has happened in the oil industry. It is an effective subsidy to the US market at the cost of other markets. I'm not saying this is happening in the case of Apple, but raising the question in general.

 

You cite the case of Brazil, but one example does not prove the case (whereas a counterexample can be used to disprove a case). The mechanisms are of course complex - and I think we agree on that taxes, exchange rates, etc. I'm not trying to prove the case - only alert people to the fact that this does happen, probably unconsciously (except for oil). As the markets of India and China grow, more price parity will be had and I don't think that is a bad thing or that it disadvantages the US, rather it improves products and the global market. Things are becoming more balanced, but we should not forget the lesson from history that markets have been distorted in the favour of richer countries against the third world. In a global market, we must learn to be more cooperative, rather than have a winners and losers mentality.

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