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Google confirms iPhone compatibility for Glass, but questions remain over notifications

post #1 of 71
Thread Starter 
Reports on Friday confirmed that Google's forthcoming wearable computing device, Google Glass, will to some extent be compatible with Apple's iPhone, but the degree of interoperability between the two devices remains a mystery.

Google Glass
Google Glass. | Source: Google


Earlier on Friday, The Verge's Joshua Topolsky posted a first-person account of his experience trying out Google's face-mounted device. In it, Topolsky described the device's connectivity options as such:

The device gets data through Wi-Fi on its own, or it can tether via Bluetooth to an Android device or iPhone and use its 3G or 4G data while out and about. There?s no cellular radio in Glass, but it does have a GPS chip.



The manner in which Glass connects to a mobile device may determine a good deal of its functionality, especially given the tasks Google has shown the device performing. Demo videos for Glass show users snapping pictures, recording videos, and sending and receiving texts messages.

For Android devices, where Google controls the platform and will likely build in compatibility, this is no problem. For Apple's iPhone, though, Google could run into issues with APIs. iOS has APIs to allow devices ? such as the Pebble and Metawatch smartwatches ? to display text messages and iMessages from an iPhone. Those devices, though, skirt the issue by having their own custom-built apps running on the iPhone, limiting systems-level access.



Speaking to Glass's interoperability with the iPhone, a Google representative told AppleInsider that the device has its own Wi-Fi, has no cellular radio, has a GPS chip, and can tether via Bluetooth to an Android or iPhone device to access data: the same details reported by Topolsky.

Asked if this meant that Glass would have its own dedicated app on either platform or if Android would benefit from added functionality not available to iPhone users, we were told that the company had "no further details to share right now."

It seems unlikely that Google would limit Glass' capabilities on a rival platform, given the company's willingness to bring its services to Apple's iOS. Still, questions remain regarding just how much Glass will be able to do and how it will manage to do so. Google will likely reveal more about the device in the lead up to this year's Google I/O, given the device is expected to launch later this year for around $1,400.
post #2 of 71
It'll be as compatible as Google Maps was before getting the heave-ho...

1wink.gif
post #3 of 71
Hmm, that video looked totally shyte, but yet I think they are onto something.
post #4 of 71
It's only fair they do this. Why should Android users be the only ones that get to look like complete pricks?

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post #5 of 71
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
It's only fair they do this. Why should Android users be the only ones that get to look like complete pricks?

 

We need a chart or something to define the status of the person based on the technology they're wearing.

 

If Bluetooth headsets make people look like 'douchebags' and glasses make them look like 'complete pricks', how must the full VR headsets of the early '90s make people appear?  lol.gif

 

What about those mini-headsets that fit right in the ear? Just tiny bags? And the tooth-installed ones must be something entirely different.

 

What about watches? Has there been enough gap between always wearing one and not needing to wear one for the concept of wearing one to warrant a negative name?

I'd sort of like a small clock right in my wrist that only tells time. In my wrist. As in "changes the pigment of the skin cells to show numbers". As long as it doesn't mess with my arm hair, that'd be cool. I could get it in Palatino font!

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post #6 of 71
Much as I love apple gear, I really don't see myself wearing either and iWatch or Glass ... far too intrusive and geeky. But then, I still think people look daft, like they're talking to themselves, when using bt headsets. Maybe geeky really is the new cool.
post #7 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It's only fair they do this. Why should Android users be the only ones that get to look like complete pricks?

 

A great deal of the functionality of the goofy glasses is the same functionality purported to be in Apple's upcoming goofy bracelet.  

(asking for directions, setting memo's, commanding the phone to do something etc.)

 

Personally, I'd rather talk into my sleeve like a fake Secret Service Agent than talk to thin air, so Apple's vapourware wins over Google's vapourware for me.  

 

Also, I find it interesting that all the videos show you what the world looks like when you are wearing the glasses, but not many show how absolutely stupid the person looks walking down the street rolling their eyes back, and to the right all the time, and talking to themselves.  

 

The only person I saw wear these in real life looked like a complete goon.  

post #8 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

We need a chart or something to define the status of the person based on the technology they're wearing.

If Bluetooth headsets make people look like 'douchebags' and glasses make them look like 'complete pricks', how must the full VR headsets of the early '90s make people appear?  lol.gif

What about those mini-headsets that fit right in the ear? Just tiny bags? And the tooth-installed ones must be something entirely different.

What about watches? Has there been enough gap between always wearing one and not needing to wear one for the concept of wearing one to warrant a negative name?


I'd sort of like a small clock right in my wrist that only tells time. In my wrist. As in "changes the pigment of the skin cells to show numbers". As long as it doesn't mess with my arm hair, that'd be cool. I could get it in Palatino font!

I think watches and eyeglasses are common enough that they can not cause the doucheometer to red line but it has to fit the style and culture and not be over the top. Google Glass simply don't try to blend in with standard eyewear in any way. I think it's in the vein as having cuckoo clock on your wrist.



Now BT headsets as small, simple and useful as they are will always look a bit douchie because they exist in a space where no other tech had existed before, unlike the eyeglass and watch. Perhaps when they can be small enough to be further inside or behind the ear that it's not meant to resemble a fashionable Borg attachment it won't have that stigma any longer.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #9 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Also, I find it interesting that all the videos show you what the world looks like when you are wearing the glasses, but not many show how absolutely stupid the person looks walking down the street rolling their eyes back, and to the right all the time, and talking to themselves.

It does seem like it answers the question no one asked: "What could possibly make me look like more of a prick than holding my Galaxy Note to my ear?"


PS: @Gatorguy, I kid! 1biggrin.gif

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #10 of 71

Not that long ago, nerds were defined as those who wore calculators on their belts (or wrists). Pagers came to identify doctors as much as stethoscopes. Then carrying a brick as a cell phone became the status symbol of the mid 80s. The belt returned to prominence when Blackberry emerged as iconic. When iPods became popular, however, it was the white earbuds rather than the device that represented the conspicuous symbol. Nowadays, with many smartphones designed after the iPhone, it is not always immediately obvious whether someone is an iFanboy or Fandroid, particularly since the device stays in your pocket more than half the time.

 

Google Glass and the iWatch will represent a return to conspicuous consumerism. When either is in use, it won't hidden in the pocket or purse. It will be wrapped around your face, slapped on wrist. Others will wonder if you are recording them in photograph or video (or about to zap them as Cyclops the X-man might). 

 

I wonder if these devices, conspicuously in use as they must be, will be automatically banned in casinos, subways and other public places.

post #11 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It's only fair they do this. Why should Android users be the only ones that get to look like complete pricks?

Hey, I resemble that remark.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #12 of 71
Huh. When I put on Google Glasses, I get "Directive 4: (Classified)" in my display. That's not evil, right?

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post #13 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post  

 

Also, I find it interesting that all the videos show you what the world looks like when you are wearing the glasses, but not many show how absolutely stupid the person looks walking down the street rolling their eyes back, and to the right all the time, and talking to themselves.  

 

I still get caught off guard when someone is in the grocery store and starts talking as if they are talking to me but actually they are on their phone with BT headset. I also find it absolutely rude when people are talking on their phone while the coffee clerk is trying to take their order and people are waiting in line behind them as they say something like "just a second" and hold up their finger as if to say wait to the clerk.

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post #14 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Now BT headsets as small, simple and useful as they are will always look a bit douchie because they exist in a space where no other tech had existed before, unlike the eyeglass and watch.

False. Hearing aids.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

Not that long ago, nerds were defined as those who wore calculators on their belts (or wrists). Pagers came to identify doctors as much as stethoscopes. Then carrying a brick as a cell phone became the status symbol of the mid 80s. The belt returned to prominence when Blackberry emerged as iconic. When iPods became popular, however, it was the white earbuds rather than the device that represented the conspicuous symbol. Nowadays, with many smartphones designed after the iPhone, it is not always immediately obvious whether someone is an iFanboy or Fandroid, particularly since the device stays in your pocket more than half the time.

But when it is not in a pocket, a lot of iPhone cases go out of their way to keep the Apple logo visible.

Quote:
Google Glass and the iWatch will represent a return to conspicuous consumerism.

It could, but we don't know if Glass will be accepted as-is, and "iWatch" may be a real project, but it's unconfirmed as a product. I don't think they're as obvious as a tablet though.
post #15 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I still get caught off guard when someone is in the grocery store and starts talking as if they are talking to me but actually they are on their phone with BT headset.

Maybe a free BT headset program for the schizophrenic will help make them seem less crazy when they to themselves. An esteem builder.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #16 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

False. Hearing aids.

Perhaps my post was too ambiguous, I mean tech as fashion, not as simply as assistance for the disabled. Note that hearing aids try always sought to be inconspicuous, not standout and say "Hey, look at me, I'm mostly deaf."



Before glasses gets mentioned as aiding people not that I said simply as. Needing glasses has never really had the same stigma. Sure, as a child you can be mocked and called four-eyes but as an adult wearing corrective lenses can help you be viewed in a positive manner, but in relation to your intellect, maturity and attractiveness. Finally, there are sunglasses which are very common for all ages that serve both a practical and superficial purpose that don't appear to have a negative connotation among any age, except perhaps with a brand or style.
Edited by SolipsismX - 2/22/13 at 3:14pm

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #17 of 71
It's all bs.

I wish tech sites would make a distinction between products ready for primetime and lab experiments.
post #18 of 71

Soli, I'd be willing to betcha there will be more stylish frames and options by the time Google Glass hits the consumer market as early as the end of this year. I've seen a couple of different articles about eyewear design partners coming on board with them.

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post #19 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It does seem like it answers the question no one asked: "What could possibly make me look like more of a prick than holding my Galaxy Note to my ear?"


PS: @Gatorguy, I kid! 1biggrin.gif

At least glasses can be designed to look less prickish.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #20 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Before glasses gets mentioned as aiding people not that I said simply as. Needing glasses has never really had the same stigma. Sure, as a child you can be mocked and called four-eyes but as an adult wearing corrective lenses can help you be viewed in a positive manner, but in relation to your intellect, maturity and attractiveness. Finally, there are sunglasses which are very common for all ages that serve both a practical and superficial purpose that don't appear to have a negative connotation among any age, except perhaps with a brand or style.

 

I started wearing glasses, reluctantly, about 10 years ago as my once perfect vision started to go fuzzy. Now I have prescription sunglasses for driving which are focused on long distance, clear distance glasses for driving at night, regular glasses for walking around, regular sunglasses for walking around and computer glasses that are focused at the exact distance of my monitor at work. That's a lot to manage. One of my friends keeps recommending contacts but I just don't like the thought of sticking something in my eye, besides he has on more than a couple occasions developed an infection from not replacing his contacts often enough or something like that.

 

Anyway, long story longer, I can't see how Google Glass can accommodate people who actually wear corrective lens even if all they have is a pair of clear and a pair of sunglasses. This seems like a product for people who have perfect vision, or wear contacts, but even so they seem to be incompatible with sunglasses so at the very least you are going to need two pairs of Google Glass at $1400 each unless they make them with some sort of interchangeable lenses.

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post #21 of 71

Personally, I'm bothered by Google Glasses just because of the terrifying new world it purports to bring.

 

I don't want to see a generation raised on having an HUD on their faces 24/7. I don't want to see more morons causing accidents and killing people because they're looking at their HUDs instead of where they're going. I wouldn't be bothered by it except that the idiots killing themselves off also kill off intelligent people who can't get out of their way. If these things have GPS in them, they'd really ought to shut off and be wholly inoperable above speeds greater than 15MPH. 

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post #22 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I still get caught off guard when someone is in the grocery store and starts talking as if they are talking to me but actually they are on their phone with BT headset. I also find it absolutely rude when people are talking on their phone while the coffee clerk is trying to take their order and people are waiting in line behind them as they say something like "just a second" and hold up their finger as if to say wait to the clerk.

 

Where I live there so many people talking into thin air on the bus, the train and walking down the street that I've almost gotten used to it.  Almost.  

post #23 of 71

Waiting for Person of Interest episode where Harold hacks someones Google Glasses and use it to track him/her.

post #24 of 71
Man, if you're a cop, you soon better be on your best behavior. Defense attorneys will be looking to see that Miranda rights were read to suspects with all of the i's dotted and t's crossed. Charges of "police brutality" will be easier to prove (or disprove). And porn - don't even go there!
post #25 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Personally, I'm bothered by Google Glasses just because of the terrifying new world it purports to bring.

 

I don't want to see a generation raised on having an HUD on their faces 24/7. I don't want to see more morons causing accidents and killing people because they're looking at their HUDs instead of where they're going. I wouldn't be bothered by it except that the idiots killing themselves off also kill off intelligent people who can't get out of their way. If these things have GPS in them, they'd really ought to shut off and be wholly inoperable above speeds greater than 15MPH. 

Not too long ago I got run into from behind by a 12 year-old girl who was texting while riding her bicycle on the sidewalk. We both ended up with several lesions and contusions and my groceries went rolling into the street. She ended up with her legs all tangled up in the frame of the bike and the chain came off. I did assist her and checked out her injuries which were not too serious, but I see people all the time distracted with their cell phones while driving cars which is really scary and these young people are growing up with this mindset.

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post #26 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Anyway, long story longer, I can't see how Google Glass can accommodate people who actually wear corrective lens even if all they have is a pair of clear and a pair of sunglasses. This seems like a product for people who have perfect vision, or wear contacts, but even so they seem to be incompatible with sunglasses so at the very least you are going to need two pairs of Google Glass at $1400 each unless they make them with some sort of interchangeable lenses.

Maybe they'll have an option in Settings for calibrating them to your vision. It'll speak to you and you'll get to respond with voice commands. "1… 2… 1… 2… which is better… 1… 2… 1… 2…"

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #27 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

 

I started wearing glasses, reluctantly, about 10 years ago as my once perfect vision started to go fuzzy. Now I have prescription sunglasses for driving which are focused on long distance, clear distance glasses for driving at night, regular glasses for walking around, regular sunglasses for walking around and computer glasses that are focused at the exact distance of my monitor at work. That's a lot to manage. One of my friends keeps recommending contacts but I just don't like the thought of sticking something in my eye, besides he has on more than a couple occasions developed an infection from not replacing his contacts often enough or something like that.

 

Anyway, long story longer, I can't see how Google Glass can accommodate people who actually wear corrective lens even if all they have is a pair of clear and a pair of sunglasses. This seems like a product for people who have perfect vision, or wear contacts, but even so they seem to be incompatible with sunglasses so at the very least you are going to need two pairs of Google Glass at $1400 each unless they make them with some sort of interchangeable lenses.

The only part of Google Glass that's absolutely necessary is fully integrated with the right temple stem. I don't know what would preclude that piece from being used with corrective lenses or sunglasses. You'd obviously have to design the other frame styles to blend with the temple piece, but I would expect the option of corrective lenses would be a given.

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post #28 of 71
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
The only part of Google Glass that's absolutely necessary is fully integrated with the right temple stem. I don't know what would preclude that piece from being used with corrective lenses or sunglasses.

 

That's most of what terrifies me.


Yes, I want more and better heads up information in the future. On my devices, not on my face. I want to dictate exactly when and where I see this information, and the focal distance at which I see it. I want this information to be in the center of my field of view, not the sides.

 

The bathroom mirror is a common one. I like that idea; it could be for far more than medical information. It's usually the first pane of glass you see in the morning; it should have your day's information on it. I also like the idea of a direction line projected into the windshield of my vehicle. Have it shade the entire lane I'm in at 50% of the color I choose. Have it project ahead the way I'm supposed to go. This would be easy to line up with the person's actual field of view. And at night, you'd see the road and your destination that much more clearly. It's gonna be big. But don't put it right on my eyes. And don't put any information around the center of my field of view.

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post #29 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

That's most of what terrifies me.

Because it's big and bulky, because it looks uncomfortable to be sitting above your ear, or something else?

I wonder if might be better to having something that sits behind your ear like an old-school hearing aid, perhaps, with a weak magnetic clip, that will allow you to take what appear to be regular glasses on and off at will. Making a standard where the power and data goes through the temple piece to the frame to the lenses might allow for a wide array or styles and wouldn't be any bigger than a BT earpiece but standout less as it could be skin colored and be partially hidden by the earlobe, as well as hair.


I couldn't find a great pic but here are two that can be used to get an idea of my words didn't paint a good enough picture.



PS: How does Google Glass charge its battery? The image below is for a hearing aid that's build into glasses but I like it.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #30 of 71
Have you got your Glass eye on it? 1400 dollars of prestige?
post #31 of 71
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
Because it's big and bulky, because it looks uncomfortable to be sitting above your ear, or something else?

 

Because the ease with which it can be adapted to fit actual glasses only removes the barrier keeping it from being a "viable' option.

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post #32 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

That's most of what terrifies me.


Yes, I want more and better heads up information in the future. On my devices, not on my face. I want to dictate exactly when and where I see this information, and the focal distance at which I see it. I want this information to be in the center of my field of view, not the sides.

 

The bathroom mirror is a common one. I like that idea; it could be for far more than medical information. It's usually the first pane of glass you see in the morning; it should have your day's information on it. I also like the idea of a direction line projected into the windshield of my vehicle. Have it shade the entire lane I'm in at 50% of the color I choose. Have it project ahead the way I'm supposed to go. This would be easy to line up with the person's actual field of view. And at night, you'd see the road and your destination that much more clearly. It's gonna be big. But don't put it right on my eyes. And don't put any information around the center of my field of view.

Did you watch Topolsky's Glass video at TheVerge? One of the things that surprised him was how the tiny display screen disappeared from view when he wasn't  looking for it. It's not in the line of sight.

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post #33 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Hmm, that video looked totally shyte, but yet I think they are onto something.

I just don't see it being a bid deal.  I'm still wondering why Sergey is the only executive at Google wearing these things.  Why doesn't Larry Page and Eric Schmidt wear them?  Probably because they don't like them.  I would think that upper management should be using their own products.  If they don't even use their own products, then that says something.  Same goes with the Chromebooks.  I highly doubt their employees are using nothing but Chromebooks.  Obviously, they will give them Chromebooks as standard issue, but they might not be using them that much. 

 

To me, if ALL Google employees don't use these Glass devices all of the time, then it tells me that they are more of a novelty.

post #34 of 71

Here is something to think about.  If someone walks up to you and you are wearing these things, will you be polite enough to take them off if the other person doesn't feel comfortable with you pointing a video camera and microphone that could potentially record the conversation?


Here is my line of reasoning.


There are and WILL be people that don't want any video or audio recording taking place during a discussion and that person has three options if you don't remove them.   Here are their options.

 

1.  They can ask you politiely and if you don't remove them, they might continue talking to you.

2.  They can ask and you don't remove them they can turn around and not continue having a discussion with you.  What happens if they are your boss?  What happens if they are a customer or potential customer of yours?  What happens if it's your significant other?   You will feel embarrassed and rather upset that someone simply stopped talking to you, especially if you need something from them.  Can a company fire you for wearing them?  I don't there is any law that protects an employee from getting fired for wearing during business hours.  So, you might want to check with the company you work for and their policies on these things.  All kinds of things can happen to you if you don't take them off when asked.

3.  Physically take them off without YOUR permission which would then result in a brawl where one or both parties will get injured.

 

 

I think all three of these scenarios WILL happen if you don't take them off when asked.  I also think that wearing these things in certain areas will attract the kind of attention you DON'T want.  Which would be getting laughed, avoided, or someone taking them from you and potentially hitting you over the head.

 

I see too many potential problems with these things.  I'm not surprised Apple hasn't made any mention on whether or not they will make something similar.  If they did, I would NOT buy them.  I don't see any reason to do so.

post #35 of 71
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

3.  Physically take them off without YOUR permission which would then result in a brawl where one or both parties will get injured.

 

If you're the kind of person to up and brawl when that happens… hmm, I'm not sure how to finish that. lol.gif

 

But I agree with what you're saying. When the means of recording is that visible, most people will want some assurance of privacy, regardless of the conversation's content.

Originally posted by Relic

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post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

If you're the kind of person to up and brawl when that happens… hmm, I'm not sure how to finish that. lol.gif

 

But I agree with what you're saying. When the means of recording is that visible, most people will want some assurance of privacy, regardless of the conversation's content.

I would not want to have a discussion with someone that's wearing these things for fear of having a conversation recorded and posted on YouTube or Facebook without my permission.  It's a pain in the rear to get that stuff taken down.  


I'm not saying I would get into a brawl over it, but I would simply walk away from that person and simply decide not to conduct business with that person, continue a friendship with a someone that didn't respect my request to remove them.  Do you want cops using devices like this when they pull you over for a ticket?  It poses too many privacy issues.

 

It's bad enough that people are pulling out their smartphones in public places taking pictures/videos and being caught in the background of those pictures because some of them might be posted on YouTube or Facebook without your knowledge/permission. Do you want that?

 

I'm sure I've been captured in background photos at a restaurant, but I have no way of knowing any of those photos were posted on line.  I'm doing anything illegal or anything, it's just I don't want my photo taken and posted without permission.   It's called common curtesy.    If I have a photo of people I don't post them PERIOD.  I just don't do that.

post #37 of 71
One medical use I can see for this is for those with face blindness. The device can use facial recognition to determine who is in front of you and then show their name. I know that's very minor but I like to know if technology can have medical benefits, too, like the iPhone, iPad, and Kinect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Here is something to think about.  If someone walks up to you and you are wearing these things, will you be polite enough to take them off if the other person doesn't feel comfortable with you pointing a video camera and microphone that could potentially record the conversation?


Here is my line of reasoning.


There are and WILL be people that don't want any video or audio recording taking place during a discussion and that person has three options if you don't remove them.   Here are their options.

1.  They can ask you politiely and if you don't remove them, they might continue talking to you.
2.  They can ask and you don't remove them they can turn around and not continue having a discussion with you.  What happens if they are your boss?  What happens if they are a customer or potential customer of yours?  What happens if it's your significant other?   You will feel embarrassed and rather upset that someone simply stopped talking to you, especially if you need something from them.  Can a company fire you for wearing them?  I don't there is any law that protects an employee from getting fired for wearing during business hours.  So, you might want to check with the company you work for and their policies on these things.  All kinds of things can happen to you if you don't take them off when asked.
3.  Physically take them off without YOUR permission which would then result in a brawl where one or both parties will get injured.


I think all three of these scenarios WILL happen if you don't take them off when asked.  I also think that wearing these things in certain areas will attract the kind of attention you DON'T want.  Which would be getting laughed, avoided, or someone taking them from you and potentially hitting you over the head.

I see too many potential problems with these things.  I'm not surprised Apple hasn't made any mention on whether or not they will make something similar.  If they did, I would NOT buy them.  I don't see any reason to do so.

Those are certainly points worth considering but that can happen now with any cellphone.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #38 of 71

I went to Google's SF Glass Foundry and got to use the device for two days. It most certainly isn't vaporware. 

 

I cannot provide details as I am under NDA, but I can say this; it was awesome. I actually felt loss returning the device after two days, almost as I had lost one of my senses.  I cannot wait until I get my Explorer unit hopefully soon. :)

 

It feels so pedestrian now to actually have to do the following with my cellphone:

1) reach into my pocket

2) pull out my phone

3) turn on my phone

4) unlock my phone

5) look at the text/email/time/whatever

6) turn off my phone

7) put back in pocket

....vs just having to flick my eyes for half a second a bit up.

 

 

Google is on to something here--- even if Glass is not the device for you, in the future a similar device will be. It's just too convenient.

post #39 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilmushroom View Post

 

Google is on to something here--- even if Glass is not the device for you, in the future a similar device will be. It's just too convenient.

Not to mention it's a total chick magnet. /s

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #40 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I started wearing glasses, reluctantly, about 10 years ago as my once perfect vision started to go fuzzy. Now I have prescription sunglasses for driving which are focused on long distance, clear distance glasses for driving at night, regular glasses for walking around, regular sunglasses for walking around and computer glasses that are focused at the exact distance of my monitor at work. That's a lot to manage. One of my friends keeps recommending contacts but I just don't like the thought of sticking something in my eye, besides he has on more than a couple occasions developed an infection from not replacing his contacts often enough or something like that.

Anyway, long story longer, I can't see how Google Glass can accommodate people who actually wear corrective lens even if all they have is a pair of clear and a pair of sunglasses. This seems like a product for people who have perfect vision, or wear contacts, but even so they seem to be incompatible with sunglasses so at the very least you are going to need two pairs of Google Glass at $1400 each unless they make them with some sort of interchangeable lenses.

I smell class action lawsuit. Google Glass discriminates against the vision impaired!

/s

Not that i'll waste $1500 on this.
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