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HTC targets iPhone owners, hopes to draw converts by syncing from iPhone backups

post #1 of 37
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Eclipsed by Samsung's rise, HTC is planning to claw back market share in the smartphone sector by targeting a specific set of users with its high-quality flagship unit: iPhone owners.

HTC One


When the new HTC One launches in March, the Taiwanese manufacturer will roll out a new version of its HTC Sync Manager desktop application. The new version will have an added feature: the ability to extract information from iPhone backup files. That information would allow iPhone users switching to the One to transfer their photos, calendar entries, text messages, videos, and more.

CNet Asia, which first reported on the new Sync Manager, says it is unclear whether the software will work across both PC and Mac platforms, but previous versions of it did.

Initial reactions to the One have been quite positive, with tech media praising the handset's spec sheet ? which includes a quad-core processor, 2GB of RAM, and a 1080p display ? as well as the high build quality of its unibody, machined aluminum chassis. Earlier this month, a leaked image of the device circulated around the Web showing an exterior design closely resembling Apple's iPhone 5.

HTC One


How the One will fare in attracting iPhone users, though, has yet to be seen. Brand loyalty among iOS device users is a major driver behind the power and popularity of the platform, with some observers estimating a cumulative iOS customer value of $295 billion.

Apple's iOS ecosystem ? both its app environment and accessory environment ? is a major factor in customer loyalty. Many of the top apps for iOS are also available for Android, so HTC may see some traction on that front. The manufacturer will have a harder time, though, getting iPhone users to abandon the accessory ecosystem, in which some may have invested hundreds ? even thousands ? of dollars.
post #2 of 37

Good luck with that! It's a one way street.

post #3 of 37
"The manufacturer will have a harder time, though, getting iPhone users to abandon the accessory ecosystem, in which some may have invested hundreds — even thousands — of dollars."

Apple already removed this obstacle for me with the lightning connector.

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post #4 of 37

Sounds like the makings of the Palm Pre syncing debacle all over again.

 
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post #5 of 37

Bad strategy.

 

Especially given HTC's huge slip in sales, it would be far wiser for them to try and target their competitors, which includes Samsung and other Android phone makers.

 

As numerous studies have shown, most iPhone owners are extremely satisfied and have no intentions of switching. When people are extremely satisfied with what they've already got, they're not going to switch. Apple has higher satisfaction ratings than anybody else. An Android phone maker attempting to steal away a few iPhone users seems like a huge waste of time. If somebody was going out with a hot chick, at least an 8.2 on the hotness scale, would they dump that chick and shack up with an ugly duckling, somebody who is ranked no higher than 4.5? It makes no sense at all, unless somebody has an ugly fetish of course, and in that case, maybe they might like Android phones.

 

And even if an iPhone user was able to sync up their photos, text messages etc., over to an Android phone, then so what? You're not going to be able to use any of the iOS apps that you have and use, so what's the point? Nobody is going to switch over to Android because of Android's amazing app selection. The difference between the iOS ecosystem and Android's ecosystem is like the difference between heaven and hell.

post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryA View Post

"The manufacturer will have a harder time, though, getting iPhone users to abandon the accessory ecosystem, in which some may have invested hundreds — even thousands — of dollars."

Apple already removed this obstacle for me with the lightning connector.

Nonsense. You would've switched anyway. Anyone who seriously wants to keep their 30-pin dock connector accessories can do so with the lightning-to-dock-connector adapter. I've got one; it works great with my sound dock.

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post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryA View Post

"The manufacturer will have a harder time, though, getting iPhone users to abandon the accessory ecosystem, in which some may have invested hundreds — even thousands — of dollars."

Apple already removed this obstacle for me with the lightning connector.

 

Just as they did with people who had invested hundreds of dollars in floppy discs back in 1998, and now CDs/DVDs.  And what about people who invested in serial or parallel port devices on PCs?  ADB, PS/2, SCSI, Firewire, ... the list goes on and on.

 
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post #8 of 37
Samsung should stop going against apple.
post #9 of 37
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Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Bad strategy.

 

...

 

I wouldn't say it will get them very far, but I wouldn't say "bad strategy" either.  

 

One of the biggest holes in the Android system is the fact that you can't really do backups very well and almost no backup software exists.  I have a couple of friends who lost everything on an Android phone through the use of a simple "reset phone" command which wipes everything out.  Once of them was even a victim of a deliberate prank in that regard, loaning their phone to a friend for just a moment and then having that "friend" wipe out all their contacts, pictures and music in seconds.  

 

I've also demonstrated the iPhone to people and had them been effusive over the fact that they will never lose their contact info ever again.  Several have told me that they always ignored contact and address book apps in the past because "... at some point you lose everything anyway," (but no more).  

 

I think Android vendors in general would do well to implement and showcase this sort of thing.  

post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryA View Post

"The manufacturer will have a harder time, though, getting iPhone users to abandon the accessory ecosystem, in which some may have invested hundreds — even thousands — of dollars."

Apple already removed this obstacle for me with the lightning connector.

And Apple provides adapters for those who want to use their existing accessories with their brand new iPhone 5.

I understand your complaint. But seriously... Apple changing their connector after 10 years... that really isn't as bad as you think it is.

At least Apple has an accessory ecosystem. It's very difficult to find accessories for MicroUSB devices.

Again... I understand this period of adjustment will be tricky. But if the new Lightning Connector lasts another 10 years... it will be fine.
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I wouldn't say it will get them very far, but I wouldn't say "bad strategy" either.  

One of the biggest holes in the Android system is the fact that you can't really do backups very well and almost no backup software exists.  I have a couple of friends who lost everything on an Android phone through the use of a simple "reset phone" command which wipes everything out.  Once of them was even a victim of a deliberate prank in that regard, loaning their phone to a friend for just a moment and then having that "friend" wipe out all their contacts, pictures and music in seconds.  

I've also demonstrated the iPhone to people and had them been effusive over the fact that they will never lose their contact info ever again.  Several have told me that they always ignored contact and address book apps in the past because "... at some point you lose everything anyway," (but no more).  

I think Android vendors in general would do well to implement and showcase this sort of thing.  

Doesn't Google automatically back up your contacts in GMail?
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

One of the biggest holes in the Android system is the fact that you can't really do backups very well and almost no backup software exists.  I have a couple of friends who lost everything on an Android phone through the use of a simple "reset phone" command which wipes everything out.  

 

A full reset can be done to an iOS device as well.

 

 

Like many people, I've had all my contacts stored in Google for years.  What's really nice is that Google supports almost every kind of device.

 

It doesn't matter if you bought an iPhone, a WebOS Palm Pre, a Windows phone, or an Android device... just sign into Google when you get them, and within seconds down comes all your contacts, mail and calendar entries.  And with Chrome, so do your bookmarks.  Nowadays, even the apps can come down automatically if you wish.

 

If you make a change, the info is kept instantly updated between all the devices.  I have four iPod touches, 2 iPads, three commonly used Android tablets, and two Android phones, that all can keep sync'd up. (I finally turned automatic email sync off half of them, because it got kind of crazy when an email came in, and they'd all start chiming around the house - grin).

 

Photos I keep uploaded on my Flickr Pro account where they're safe.

post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


Doesn't Google automatically back up your contacts in GMail?

Yes, Google's Android automatically backs up your contacts.

 

http://support.google.com/android/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=168906

 

http://support.google.com/android/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1665500

 

 

Get your contacts

 

 
If you have a Google Account, any contacts associated with that account are automatically backed up by Google. This means all your contacts are always available on the web and can be synced to any Android phone that's set up with the same account.

As a result, even if you lose your phone, switch to a new phone, or use a desktop computer, your contacts are always available.

 

 

Backing up and restoring your data

 
You can back up your settings and other data with your Google Account, so if you ever replace your tablet, you can restore your data on the new one. If you choose to use this service, your data is backed up automatically.

If you previously used the backup service with the Google Account you just used to sign in, you can also choose to restore your settings from your Google Account to your tablet now.

 

Important: If you want to restore your settings, you must do that now during setup. You can’t restore data after setup is complete.

 

Many kinds of data are backed up, including:

  • Your Android settings, such as your Wi-Fi networks and passwords, user dictionary, and so on
  • Many Google application settings, such as your Browser bookmarks
  • The apps you download on Google Play
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post #14 of 37
Doesn't Apple receive $8 for each of these sold? Nice outcome if it does catch on and especially if it eats into Samsung sales.
post #15 of 37
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Yes, Google's Android automatically backs up your contacts.

Thanks... I thought so.

I remember countless times hearing "I lost my phone... send me your phone numbers" long ago.

Android kinda prevents that now.
post #16 of 37

God this story reads like something that would come from cnet.  My guess is HTC is targeting more than iPhone users, but throwing iPhone or Apple in the headline gets more clicks.

post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

God this story reads like something that would come from cnet.  My guess is HTC is targeting more than iPhone users, but throwing iPhone or Apple in the headline gets more clicks.

Well... the article does say this:

"... HTC Sync Manager... will have an added feature: the ability to extract information from iPhone backup files."
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by currentinterest View Post

Doesn't Apple receive $8 for each of these sold? Nice outcome if it does catch on and especially if it eats into Samsung sales.

That' what analyst Shaw Wu thinks so it must be true.

 

/s

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post #19 of 37
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Yes, Google's Android automatically backs up your contacts.

Of course. How is Google going to steal your private information if they don't download it to their servers?
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post #20 of 37
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Originally Posted by majjo View Post

I don't think Google syncs photos or SMS (unless you use Google voice).

True... I was speaking more about contacts.

Like I said... people used to "lose" their phone numbers all the time.

That doesn't seem to happen much anymore.

As for photos... if the only copy of those photos exist on the phone... that's their problem 1smile.gif
post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Nonsense. You would've switched anyway. Anyone who seriously wants to keep their 30-pin dock connector accessories can do so with the lightning-to-dock-connector adapter. I've got one; it works great with my sound dock.

Good point. I had heard that the adapter doesn't work for analog docks, which I thought was the case with the Bose Sound Dock. I was quite perturbed about that, but I'm glad I was mistaken.

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post #22 of 37
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Originally Posted by auxio View Post

Just as they did with people who had invested hundreds of dollars in floppy discs back in 1998, and now CDs/DVDs.  And what about people who invested in serial or parallel port devices on PCs?  ADB, PS/2, SCSI, Firewire, ... the list goes on and on.

Ooh, i really feel the burn on that one! Doesn't make it any less true that the obstacle to switching named by the article is the same whether going to an iPhone 5 or this phone. Although I did forget about the adapters, I could employ a 1/4" jack for audio just as easily as a lightning to 30 pin cable.

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post #23 of 37
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Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Nonsense. You would've switched anyway. Anyone who seriously wants to keep their 30-pin dock connector accessories can do so with the lightning-to-dock-connector adapter. I've got one; it works great with my sound dock.

The whole accessories argument is mostly silly.

I have 2x Apple dock for iPhone 3Gs, and Logitech speakers system. Logitech system had interchangeable plastic "cradles" for different iOS devices, but since 3Gs was current phone at the time, id didn't come with cradle shaped for more edgy 4 or 4s, nor have I noticed that they were offered later on. iPhone docks were also moulded for 3Gs shape, so no 4, 4s or 5, regardless of connector.

Some - a lot, maybe - accessories have backward compatibility, but how many are actually future-proof, considering that Apple changes device shape every generation or two, same connector or not?
post #24 of 37
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Of course. How is Google going to steal your private information if they don't download it to their servers?

Oh, le poison! 1wink.gif

But you might be right there, and I am also reluctant to give Google any important info of mine. I mean, they do live of advertising.
post #25 of 37
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Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

But you might be right there, and I am also reluctant to give Google any important info of mine. I mean, they do live off advertising.

 

Sure, but so what.  Likewise, Apple has most people's credit card and address info, and personal tastes derived from app and media purchases.

 

Just like Apple with its iAds, Google makes money off advertising... by keeping our info out of the hands of the advertisers who are paying for anonymous targeted slots.  

 

If the advertisers had the info, they wouldn't need to pay Apple or Google for ad placement.

post #26 of 37
Lightning is a fantastic interface. So much nicer than the old 30-pin, but the pin-heads at Samsung would lie to make people think otherwise.
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryA View Post


Ooh, i really feel the burn on that one! Doesn't make it any less true that the obstacle to switching named by the article is the same whether going to an iPhone 5 or this phone. Although I did forget about the adapters, I could employ a 1/4" jack for audio just as easily as a lightning to 30 pin cable.

 

I wasn't trying to "burn" you.  The media made such a big deal out of the connector change, replete with sob stories from angry switchers, that it makes me wonder whether people have selective memories when it comes to all of the different connectors they've used over the years (and the money they've spent on peripherals).

 

But anyways, yes, there's an adapter, and it works quite well from my experience.  I use one with my car dock connector and haven't had any problems with it.

 
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post #28 of 37
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Originally Posted by majjo View Post


I don't think Google syncs photos or SMS (unless you use Google voice).

The Google+ app is what they use to back up photos. I use it to keep all my photos in sync on my nexus 4.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Of course. How is Google going to steal your private information if they don't download it to their servers?

We all know that google is a advertising company but they do not have some guy just looking at your information. Its a program that compiles keywords and gives you adds based on that. It does not give your information to the advertisers. It links the ads to the correct people. Google does value privacy hints why we have not  seen too many reports of user data being hacked. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dookie Howsre View Post

Lightning is a fantastic interface. So much nicer than the old 30-pin, but the pin-heads at Samsung would lie to make people think otherwise.

Other then it being universal...There is no user benefits to lightning over USB micro-b. It is an obvious attempt of apple maintaining dominance on its accessory makers. 

post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Yes, Google's Android automatically backs up your contacts.

Of course. How is Google going to steal your private information if they don't download it to their servers?

"No your honor, we were given this info because people entered it on their phone, therefore it wasn't stealing" /s
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Of course. How is Google going to steal your private information if they don't download it to their servers?

Oh, le poison! 1wink.gif

But you might be right there, and I am also reluctant to give Google any important info of mine. I mean, they do live of advertising.

I keep a lot of sensitive info in the notes field of the contacts, like alarm codes et cetera. Wouldn't want to upload all that to Google, and certainly hope there won't be a major security issue at Apple. It'll take quite some time and effort to make all that info obsolete.
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post #30 of 37

Funny enough an owner of a HTC desire showed me the SyncManager just this weekend, when I met him down t'pub. He loved it. He has a Mac and an Android device ( clearly) and the sync manager as it is now working syncs music. Which means music on the Mac is uploaded to a cloud ( I presume) and downloaded to the device - that or he can play it over a stream. Photos too etc.

 

So this does work. As for getting iPhone users as opposed to Mac users, not necessarily that easy ( and in fact there is little that reading this file can add except maybe some system settings, it can't really download the apps - although you could read the apps from the xml - or from iTunes -  google play doesn't have an API to do that)


Edited by asdasd - 2/26/13 at 2:25am
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post #31 of 37

Sooooo, if someone connects their HTC to my Mac, goes to iTunes, they can transfer all my stuff to their phone?

 

I know that there are apps which allow you to read/extract info from iTunes backup files, but this has got to be more of a problem than the two iPhone hacks reported this week? Both cases would require access to my devices: iPhone and computer.

post #32 of 37
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Originally Posted by sip View Post

Sooooo, if someone connects their HTC to my Mac, goes to iTunes, they can transfer all my stuff to their phone?

I know that there are apps which allow you to read/extract info from iTunes backup files, but this has got to be more of a problem than the two iPhone hacks reported this week? Both cases would require access to my devices: iPhone and computer.

I don't think it works over the connector.

Probably.

The Mac app talks to iTunes and gets the playlists.
Music is uploaded to the cloud.
Playlists appear in the Syncmanager.
You can stream the music on HTC.

All valid API and fair use ( dependent on the country). Similar to match.
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post #33 of 37

Doesn't every phone maker want to take sales away from Apple....and other companies?  There is nothing new in this article.

post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sip View Post

Sooooo, if someone connects their HTC to my Mac, goes to iTunes, they can transfer all my stuff to their phone?

I know that there are apps which allow you to read/extract info from iTunes backup files, but this has got to be more of a problem than the two iPhone hacks reported this week? Both cases would require access to my devices: iPhone and computer.

It depends.

If your backup is encrypted, they can't do it without your password. In fact, I'm not sure the HTC solution will work at all if you have your backup file encrypted. It might fall under DMCA.
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post #35 of 37
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Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Bad strategy.

 

Especially given HTC's huge slip in sales, it would be far wiser for them to try and target their competitors, which includes Samsung and other Android phone makers.

I agree, their target should be Samsung's many phones, particularly the ones given away with no down payment.

This iPhone user would NEVER consider moving to a Google Spyware phone.

post #36 of 37

In response to what can or cannot be backed up on an android device...

 

For a typical user with a gmail account: your emails, contacts, calendar data, apps, wifi password are all backed up. If you chose to use the service, you can also have it automatically backup your photos using picasa. You can also sync your chrome bookmarks, etc as well. All this stuff is stored on the google servers.

 

For a power user with a rooted device you have a lot of powerful back up options. The phone typically has a recovery mode where you can do complete image backups (i.e. "nandroid backup"), this will back up absolutely everything including text messages, apps, settings. Another really popular option is an app called Titanium Backup. You can use that one to backup individual user and system apps. These backups are typically stored on either the internal memory or your sdcard, you also have the option to use a cloud based server like Google Drive or DropBox. One additional feature of Titanium Backup is the option to remove "bloatware" from the device that your wireless provider has forced on you.

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Of course. How is Google going to steal your private information if they don't download it to their servers?

 

You also have the choice to back up information to your SIM card if you have an Android phone.  Google doesn't require storing contacts in GMail...  You can have an Android phone that has absolutely no contact with Google if you desire...  

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