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Apple's settlement over in-app purchasing inches closer to approval, may include 23M refunds

post #1 of 120
Thread Starter 
Apple's proposed settlement over in-app purchases made by unwitting children was discussed in a court hearing on Friday, with counsel for both parties hammering out how the Cupertino company will mete out refunds.

In the settlement, which could see claims from over 23 million iTunes users, Apple is offering plaintiffs $5 iTunes credits, the same amount in cash, or full refunds for claims over $30. News of Apple's settlement was first reported on Monday.

Tap Fish
Tap Fish HD has been used as an example of Apple's previously lax protocols on in-app purchasing.


According to in-court reports from CNET, Apple will send out more than 23 million notices to iTunes users who were possibly affected by the company's in-app purchasing process, which allegedly made it too easy for minors to accrue fees on their parents' credit cards. The actual number of payouts will likely be much smaller, Apple's counsel said, as users need to meet certain requirements in order to file successful claims.

As stipulated in the settlement language, purchases need to have been made by a minor without the consent of their guardian and only apply to certain apps. To this end, claimants must also fill out a form stating which apps were used to make the charges.

With the various stiuplations, U.S. District Court Judge Edward Davila voiced concern over the level of responsibility placed upon affected consumers, which includes sifting through past purchases to find the offending apps.

"It seems like you're asking the plaintiffs to do a lot," Judge Davila said. "Apple has this information," he continued. "They're in the best position to retrieve this information."

Apple's attorney pointed out that users are able to view their entire iTunes purchase history online, and noted that a special tool will be embedded on the settlement's website that can aid in seeking out relevant apps.

Plaintiffs filed suit in April of 2011, claiming their children were buying hundreds of dollars worth of in-game items without realizing the attachment to real-world money.

At issue are "freemium" apps that can be downloaded at no cost but allow users to purchase upgrades and in-game currency sometimes priced at over $100. Apple was dragged into the suit over its past protocols regarding iTunes account passwords, which allowed for a certain amount of time to pass before a user was prompted to re-enter their code. The window was large enough, plaintiffs said, for children to make purchases without parental approval. Apple modified the password window in iOS 4.3.

As for Apple's settlement, a federal judge is expected to rule on its approval next week.
post #2 of 120

Yea - dump the freemium apps completely. They really are annoying.

Always wondered how they were able to be there in the first place. Met all the criteria I suppose ...

Lesson learned - move on.

post #3 of 120
Developers who put things costing $100 in a kid's app should be ashamed of themselves.
post #4 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobM View Post

Yea - dump the freemium apps completely. They really are annoying.
Always wondered how they were able to be there in the first place. Met all the criteria I suppose ...
Lesson learned - move on.

Because Apple gets 30% that's why.
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post #5 of 120

Apple can charge the refund back to the developer. 

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post #6 of 120
There still needs to be parental supervision and responsibility at some point. Would most parents let their kids run amok with their credit cards?

Apple should make in-app purchases harder by default, with the option to set monetary limits however.
post #7 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadbean View Post

There still needs to be parental supervision and responsibility at some point. Would most parents let their kids run amok with their credit cards?

Apple should make in-app purchases harder by default, with the option to set monetary limits however.

Most parents don't give the credit card PIN to their children, before iOS 4.3 that was what access to an iOS device was.

 

Monetary limits are pointless, these parents haven't understood parental controls sufficiently well enough to prevent their kids from making purchases on their accounts. Additional settings would also need explaining & setting up correctly.

Apple could allow users to lock payments on the entire iTunes account, but that would be adding a barrier to their 30%.

 

How about actually disabling in app purchases by default. It would also help if iOS supported multiple users, so a kids account could be locked to 3 apps & no browser/ internet or settings.app, without crippling the features that adults or responsible teens require, weirdly Apple seem to think buying multiple devices is the answer to that problem.

post #8 of 120

If the issue has been fixed since iOS 4.3, then I sure hope that they don't pay out a single penny to any dumb and irresponsible parent since the arrival of iOS 4.3.

 

Some parents just need to take better care of their kids. Parents are responsible for whatever their children do in the real world, and they should also be responsible for whatever their children do in the virtual world also. Ignorance should not be a valid defense.

 

I'm not a developer, but if I were, I would definitely be targeting gullible kids. I'd make some sort of freemium app with all these cute, colorful characters in it and silly music, and I would make the game easy at first to lock the kids in and get them hooked, but after that, it would get much harder, and gems would be required to complete most tasks. The kids would either have to give up on playing the game as it becomes too frustrating or they would have to harass their parents and try to talk them into buying a few gems.

 

The bottom line is that any good parent should be following what their kids are up to online. 

post #9 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Because Apple gets 30% that's why.

lol - yea there is that I suppose. But I don't think Apple are that cynical to think that these apps are a smart way to make money.

Drop them from the store or use more stringent criteria policing these apps so the devs can't get themselves in to trouble. Or just make a unilateral policy.

post #10 of 120
Ahem.. Password? Just saying...
post #11 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadbean View Post

Apple should make in-app purchases harder by default, with the option to set monetary limits however.

I agree. The default password requirement after a purchase is 15 minutes, but really should be put to 'immediately'. People who do not hand over their device to kid can change that default easily, should it bug them.
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post #12 of 120

I'm a parent, and I would be really upset if I received an iTunes bill for $2500... however, at what point will parents take responsibility for their own action or inaction and stop blaming someone else? You gave your kid a piece of technology with your credit card attached to it.  Maybe some parents don't understand how an iPod touch or iPhone works, but they need to research and learn before they hand their kids the keys to the kingdom.  How much will these parents research other things their kids do? (movies, video games, TV, relationships, etc).  It's kind of scary...

post #13 of 120
It's the developers, who deliberately make in-app purchases ambiguous, too easy and way over-priced, who should be paying the refunds. Apple may be guilty of not controlling the developers app capability better, but it the unscrupulous developers who have deliberately tried to trap children into making these horrendous purchases. They should kill their apps and move them over to Android, where there is no quality control.
post #14 of 120

I find it obnoxious that something can be billed as “free” when it’s an engine for generating sales. Apple should require that this class of app be specifically labelled, and require entering an app store password to download. That way no one can be conned into installing something that their kids (or anyone else) can use to run up big real money expenditure. I’ve run into an iPad game called War Game that’s free and has its own internal game currency, but tries to sell you extras for real-world $$. Someone not paying close attention could spend real money unintentionally. In this case, not too obnoxious, because you don’t really need the extras, and it’s not targeting young kids. Even so, there’s a nasty feeling of sleight of hand to the whole thing.

 

Apple blocks stuff that contains innocent phrasing that could have a porn connection, yet allows dishonest app marketing practices.

 

Apple is up there with Exxon in market cap. They don’t need to match them on business ethics.

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Philip Machanick creator of Opinionations and Green Grahamstown
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post #15 of 120
Once again, parents assume no fault for being stupid. Being game creators for putting in-game purchase in kids game...it's the new business model for mobile games...unless you like to go back to $40-$50 game per physical game disc.

There are times I absolutely hate parents that are clearly dumb and blames someone else for their ignorance. Don't hand you 3-5 yrs old kids with a $500 device if you dont anticipate them to 1) break it 2) buy random things...educate yourself before giving your kids anything or don't have kids!
post #16 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Droid View Post

Most parents don't give the credit card PIN to their children, before iOS 4.3 that was what access to an iOS device was.

Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

Ahem.. Password? Just saying...

I really wish people would read the story before commenting. I know that's a lot to ask.

The affected parents did not give their password or PIN to their kids. Rather, the problem was due to the fact that the password remains active for 15 minutes after you enter it. So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes.

There is a setting that allows you to eliminate that time delay and require the password to be re-entered immediately. That should have been set to 'immediate' by default. On a consumer device, it should almost always default to 'most secure' and allow the user to make it less secure if they wish.

In this case, I think the parents have a good point.
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post #17 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post



I really wish people would read the story before commenting. I know that's a lot to ask.

The affected parents did not give their password or PIN to their kids. Rather, the problem was due to the fact that the password remains active for 15 minutes after you enter it. So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes.

There is a setting that allows you to eliminate that time delay and require the password to be re-entered immediately. That should have been set to 'immediate' by default. On a consumer device, it should almost always default to 'most secure' and allow the user to make it less secure if they wish.

In this case, I think the parents have a good point.

 

"So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes."

 

You are defending "duh-duh-duh" moment for all of humanity...here's a simple questions then, whose fault is it to hand the iphone & ipad to their child after immediate downloads? There are seat-belts in cars and if you dont put them on don't blame the manufacturer.

post #18 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by philipm View Post

I find it obnoxious that something can be billed as “free” when it’s an engine for generating sales. Apple should require that this class of app be specifically labelled, and require entering an app store password to download. That way no one can be conned into installing something that their kids (or anyone else) can use to run up big real money expenditure. .

 

They list 'top in app purchases' on these apps which should be a red flag to parents that bother to look. Passwords are required, and you can use restrictions to turn off the grace period plus IAP all together. 

 

And many of the games and apps are marked for older kids and adults and yet Mommy and Daddy are letting their toddlers etc at them. Like this recent kid in the UK. They didn't look at the game which was rated for older kids or watch this kid who had apparently never been allowed to play on the iPad too see what he was doing. They downloaded, sent him off to another room etc

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #19 of 120
Clearly one of the most careless moves by Apple was to enable this feature without thinking about the deeper consequences. I'm not so sure but they introduced those in-app purchase disabling features a little later right? The thing is it's deep down into the privacy settings and restrictions and stuff that most parents don't even bother. That's where Apple's motives come into picture.
post #20 of 120
Originally Posted by jpadhiyar View Post
That's where Apple's motives come into picture.

 

No, that's where human laziness comes into the picture. Apple's subsequent actions prove your claim wrong.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #21 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post



I really wish people would read the story before commenting. I know that's a lot to ask.

The affected parents did not give their password or PIN to their kids. Rather, the problem was due to the fact that the password remains active for 15 minutes after you enter it. So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes.

There is a setting that allows you to eliminate that time delay and require the password to be re-entered immediately. That should have been set to 'immediate' by default. On a consumer device, it should almost always default to 'most secure' and allow the user to make it less secure if they wish.

In this case, I think the parents have a good point.

 

Bingo. This happened to my family a few months back. My wife bought a few books for my 5 year old and handed the iPad back to her, a few days later we get an iTunes receipt for $250.  Kiddo clicked on an ad in a game and wound up purchasing another app.

 

Apple refunded the money and we learned a lesson, but the default should be to the most secure option. Kids are kids. 

post #22 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techboy View Post

 

"So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes."

 

You are defending "duh-duh-duh" moment for all of humanity...here's a simple questions then, whose fault is it to hand the iphone & ipad to their child after immediate downloads? There are seat-belts in cars and if you dont put them on don't blame the manufacturer.

 

If the seat belts were hidden under the seat or you needed a specific, non-obvious setting to get them to work, they wouldn't get used as much would they?  If such a requirement existed, car manufacturers would be partly responsible I think. 

post #23 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techboy View Post

 

"So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes."

 

You are defending "duh-duh-duh" moment for all of humanity...here's a simple questions then, whose fault is it to hand the iphone & ipad to their child after immediate downloads? There are seat-belts in cars and if you dont put them on don't blame the manufacturer.

More to the point, hand it to them and walk away

 

in the previous 10-15 years there was this huge uproar over kids and access to the computer. don't put it in their room but in a 'public' space. Know what they are doing etc.

 

now folks hand even 3 year olds an iOS device and turn a blind eye. Take some responsibility

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post #24 of 120

I highly suspect that those slamming the parents, don't have any young kids of their own.

 

The IAP thing happened to us last year.  Wife downloaded a game, gave the iPad to our daughter, ended up with $250 of purchases within minutes.    Fully expecting to pay for this mistake, we wrote Apple to simply ask how to prevent it in the future.  Apple voluntarily responded that they would remove the charges and sent a form email with instructions on how to turn off the "feature". 

 

Mind you, our daughter had used Android tablets for years before this... without any problem.  (She had preferred them because of all the online kid's apps that were based on Flash.)   Such games almost always have fake money to buy game options, and kids get used to that.

 

So we thought we doing good when we let her use an iPad instead, after she had expressed an interest in Apple products as she got older.  We figured that Apple, of all companies, would not have a system that was less kid and parent friendly than Android. 

 

It's heavily ironic that people will promote Apple's products as "they just work", and the iPad as "usable by even babies", and then turn around and claim buyers should know about every setting menu, in order to turn off something that should've been off by default in the first place.

post #25 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

I highly suspect that those slamming the parents, don't have any young kids of their own.

 

 

Precisely.  And if/when they do have kids of their own, they'll deal with similar situations and feel pretty much the same.  I do accept the responsibility - Apple was kind enough to refund our money as well - But even accepting the responsibility as a parent, you can't prevent everything a kid will do.  And unfortunately, the IAP is just too easy if you don't know how to prevent it. 

post #26 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

More to the point, hand it to them and walk away

 

in the previous 10-15 years there was this huge uproar over kids and access to the computer. don't put it in their room but in a 'public' space. Know what they are doing etc.

 

now folks hand even 3 year olds an iOS device and turn a blind eye. Take some responsibility

 

Such a silly statement.  Do you have kids?  I suspect not.

 

My children's access to the iPad is monitored, as well as any computer access.  Guess what, you can't prevent everything.  If you have children, you should know this.  Accidents happen.  The IAP should default to requiring a password every time.  Err on the side of caution, especially if you're targeting kids as your app's demographic.

 

Yes, there are parents who don't monitor their children when it comes to tech.  I'm not one of those, but it still happened to me.  

post #27 of 120
The solution seems simple: Make in-app purchases work differently than regular app purchases. They could make it as complex as having a separate set of settings for granular control or as simple as requiring it each time. The latter would be annoying for the user and likely hurt in-app sales for Apple and developers but it would protect Apple.


PS: They really need to let us password protect Settings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Techboy View Post

"So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes."


You are defending "duh-duh-duh" moment for all of humanity...here's a simple questions then, whose fault is it to hand the iphone & ipad to their child after immediate downloads? There are seat-belts in cars and if you dont put them on don't blame the manufacturer.

Again, did you read what he said. The parent had to input a password buy the app. From their PoV the device is secure. They've probably never used in-app purchases or knew that such an opinion would allow you to bypass the password requirement within an app.

Should they hold the device for 15 minutes before letting their child use it? Really? To make your car analogy work it's like expecting that once you buckle your children in you have to wait 15 minutes before you drive off before the seatbelt is secure. Would you not blame the manufacturer then?
Edited by SolipsismX - 3/2/13 at 9:01am

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post #28 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

They list 'top in app purchases' on these apps which should be a red flag to parents that bother to look. Passwords are required, and you can use restrictions to turn off the grace period plus IAP all together. 

Repeating the bold statement does not make it true. For 15 minutes after accessing the App Store, passwords were NOT required. That's the point.
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

More to the point, hand it to them and walk away

in the previous 10-15 years there was this huge uproar over kids and access to the computer. don't put it in their room but in a 'public' space. Know what they are doing etc.

now folks hand even 3 year olds an iOS device and turn a blind eye. Take some responsibility

Not at all. If I buy my kid an app and hand them the phone, I can see that they're still playing the same app. It's clear that they haven't gotten into porn or done anything else. They're playing the game you bought for them.

Not everyone knows all the rules. Since a large fraction of users are inexperienced, it's incumbent on them to default to the safe setting.
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post #29 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, that's where human laziness comes into the picture. Apple's subsequent actions prove your claim wrong.

Laziness created by Apple.
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post #30 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


PS: They really need to let us password protect Settings.

Too bad there's not a app for that, nor can one be made.
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post #31 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

Apple can charge the refund back to the developer. 

I'm pretty sure they can't. The issue is to do with Apple's iOS security and purchasing requirements.
post #32 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techboy View Post

"So if you download an app for your kids and then hand them the phone, it allows purchases without the kid having to enter the password for 15 minutes."


You are defending "duh-duh-duh" moment for all of humanity...here's a simple questions then, whose fault is it to hand the iphone & ipad to their child after immediate downloads? There are seat-belts in cars and if you dont put them on don't blame the manufacturer.

Jrag is exactly right. And I can only assume that you don't have kids.
If you do, and you don't let them play your iPad, etc- that's good, and totally reasonable. My wife and I don't let my 3.5 yr old touch my iPad, her mini, or our iPhones. But we did get her a touch so she can play some abc, match, puzzles, and other educational games (not angry birds, etc) as well as a movie on rare occasion. It gets used maybe 20-30 minutes every third day or so and is in a cabinet she can't reach. She doesn't even ask for it- we basically use it as a "secret weapon".

Again- If you have a kid and choose to not give your child an idevice, that's fine- and I respect that. But if you do have a kid, and you do let them use an idevice, and you download them something, like a book, you shouldn't have that 15 minute window of freedom.

This isn't a matter of dumb parents who allow a device to babysit their kid- which shouldn't happen. And believe me- there are millions of bad parents. If you're driving and your kid is in the back seat- converse with them, let them learn to look outside and watch the world, or even learn to just be quiet and sit there. I'm not a proponent of giving your kid a touch so you can ignore them to do what you wish and they can be absorbed in an electronic game. But there are instances where that device is extremely useful so you can do something you need to do if your kid is in one of those moods. Parents know those moods I'm talking about (and I have great, polite kids- they all get moods).

Its a separate issue of how to parent or if your kids are supposed to be on a game or not. This issue is that It's a glitch and understandably should be fixed.
Edited by Andysol - 3/2/13 at 10:39am

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post #33 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

I highly suspect that those slamming the parents, don't have any young kids of their own.

The IAP 
thing happened to us last year.  Wife downloaded a game, gave the iPad to our daughter, ended up with $250 of purchases within minutes.    Fully expecting to pay for this mistake, we wrote Apple to simply ask how to prevent it in the future.  Apple voluntarily responded that they would remove the charges and sent a form email with instructions on how to turn off the "feature". 


Mind you, our daughter had used Android tablets for years before this... without any problem.  (She had preferred them because of all the online kid's apps that were based on Flash.)   Such games almost always have fake money to buy game options, and kids get used to that.

So we thought we doing good when we let her use an iPad instead, after she had expressed an interest in Apple products as she got older.  We figured that Apple, of all companies, would not have a system that was less kid and parent friendly than Android. 

It's heavily ironic that people will promote Apple's products as "they just work", and the iPad as "usable by even babies", and then turn around and claim buyers should know about every setting menu, in order to turn off something that should've been off by default in the first place.

+100000

I too find it's always those who have no experience or understanding to be the ones most likely to pass judgement and condemn others for not knowing better, no matter what the issue.

The internet provides a forum for psychopaths and bullies to spout their selfishness anonymously. They do it also to provoke reactions from people because of a mental illness that means they like to see others getting upset.

Having worked with psychopaths, I came to recognise "trolling" behaviour, such as a propensity to condem others and trying to illicit anxiety and upset. Now I just ignore it (because it's so boring), pass off the attempts with mild amusement or assume that the posts are satirical like Stephen Colbert!

I don't really blame them because it's probably a mental illness or genetic predisposition for which they have little control or understanding. If anything I feel kind of sorry for them.
Edited by s.metcalf - 3/2/13 at 10:45am
post #34 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

PS: They really need to let us password protect Settings.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Too bad there's not a app for that, nor can one be made.

 

If you are willing to setup a Mac server & use Apple's profile manager you can lock down everything as desired. It covers all the parental controls along with some additional tools like remote wipe.

e.g. You can use 'single app mode' that prevents users switching into to other apps. It is used in schools for tests so that kids cannot use Google for the answers. You can only allow certain wifi networks & force proxy settings onto the device etc. You can also assign apps time limits & force them into iBooks once they played games for xx minutes…

 

Sadly it's difficult to configure & is beyond many parents knowledge of iOS (and most iOS advanced users too). 

 

Slapping some more passwords or timeouts on the iTunes purchasing interface also doesn't help with Safari cookies (and other apps). Kids can still login to Amazon, Ebay etc & order some new toys if you have passwords saved in the iOS keychain. All your email & other junk are at risk too.

 

It makes matters worse that you cannot even see what passwords are remembered or selectively delete them on iOS - please tell me how if I have overlooked this feature. Each app has it's own token reset system too. Android manages this better - you see all accounts in one place in the system settings, not just Twitter & Facebook.

 

I can't see how the current situation can be properly fixed without adding multiple user logins - iOS is like many Apple products not really designed to be shared.

post #35 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Too bad there's not a app for that, nor can one be made.

JB community might have one.


PS: I wish I could code because that, a guest account with apps I deem allowable (like Safari in Private Browsing mode or some games), and quick brightness* controls are what on iOS that aren't possible via the app store are apps I'd want to build for the JB community.


* By quick brightness control I don't mean an item n Notification or the Menu Bar. The problem I often run into with brightness is that the screen is really bright in a dark room where you need to dim it (oft to its minimum) as quickly as possible, and when entering daylight where you can't read the display at all. My concept — which anyone can use, BTW — is a feature that will work without the user even needing to see the display (even though there will be a circular counter on the display once initiated). It would work by simply running a finger in a circular pattern on the the center ares of the Lock Screen to initiate the service. Counterclockwise for dimmer and clockwise for brighter. After a full rotation and only adjust by 25% each full rotation after that you can do it quickly without affecting anything else. The only caveats is that motion on the display when there are notifications make them scroll up and down so you'd have to bypass that motion or start toward the top where the clock is. If anyone has a better sightless concept I'm all ears.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #36 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Droid View Post


If you are willing to setup a Mac server & use Apple's profile manager you can lock down everything as desired. It covers all the parental controls along with some additional tools like remote wipe.
e.g. You can use 'single app mode' that prevents users switching into to other apps. It is used in schools for tests so that kids cannot use Google for the answers. You can only allow certain wifi networks & force proxy settings onto the device etc. You can also assign apps time limits & force them into iBooks once they played games for xx minutes…

Sadly it's difficult to configure & is beyond many parents knowledge of iOS (and most iOS advanced users too). 

Slapping some more passwords or timeouts on the iTunes purchasing interface also doesn't help with Safari cookies (and other apps). Kids can still login to Amazon, Ebay etc & order some new toys if you have passwords saved in the iOS keychain. All your email & other junk are at risk too.

It makes matters worse that you cannot even see what passwords are remembered or selectively delete them on iOS - please tell me how if I have overlooked this feature. Each app has it's own token reset system too. Android manages this better - you see all accounts in one place in the system settings, not just Twitter & Facebook.

I can't see how the current situation can be properly fixed without adding multiple user logins - iOS is like many Apple products not really designed to be shared.

Yeah, complexity is the issue here. If it's your child's device it's a different story but if you are letting them use yours (which is common for certain ages) then it's not feasible. Once they get their own devices I suggest parents don't ever log with their accounts or CCs I say create their own iTunes accounts and use a GC or iTS money transfer options to fund apps you wish to buy them. This helps in later years and helps keep these issues to a minimum. However, it does mean that if you both want a copy Angry Birds you have to buy two copies.


PS: Have you played with iOS 6's Guided Access feature. Not really a parental feature but a way for businesses to create a personalized appliance from an iDevice, but neat nonetheless.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #37 of 120

Guided access is really neat, like many of the other accessibility options, Apple do put a great deal of thought & care into these features and they are making a real difference to many peoples lives. I like the option to speak selected text.

 

SolipsismX, your brightness idea may be already possible via jailbreak apps. Activator is an app that lets you assign extra gestures to many parts of iOS, I have mine set so that a double tap of the date in springboard or the lock screen opens a flashlight app (I use that feature daily). You do have to be careful about opening apps from the lock screen if you are at all interested in security.

 

You can also setup multi finger gestures & button combinations etc. There are extra activator add ons to provide more features - adjusting the brightness isn't there by default but there may be one already in Cydia? I suspect you would only want it to happen in springboard (some apps may use the gesture but you can override them if you really want to configure the heck out of it).

 

Personally I really love SBSettings within notification centre, just one swipe from anywhere & the brightness is tweaked in 2 taps, same with wifi, 3G etc. I also got rid of the 'Store' button in iTunes - any other developer would be penalised for having the back button change into a store button, but Apple think it is OK in their default apps.

post #38 of 120
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post
in the previous 10-15 years there was this huge uproar over kids and access to the computer. don't put it in their room but in a 'public' space. Know what they are doing etc.

 

now folks hand even 3 year olds an iOS device and turn a blind eye. Take some responsibility

 

Agreed. Somewhat sad state of affairs, but that's how it goes with the adoption of technology. Used to be parents got on kids' backs for hogging the phone; now they each have their own. And with cameras.


Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
Laziness created by Apple.

 

"It's Apple's fault I'm too lazy to learn about my device and take responsibility for the actions of my dependents!"

 

Not sure that works…


Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
Too bad there's not a app for that, nor can one be made.

 

Ah, but Apple could implement it quite simply. They SHOULD.


Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
* By quick brightness control I don't mean an item n Notification or the Menu Bar. The problem I often run into with brightness is that the screen is really bright in a dark room where you need to dim it (oft to its minimum) as quickly as possible, and when entering daylight where you can't read the display at all.

 

Shouldn't the auto-brightness be handling this? I've always found it just a little lacking, myself.

 

My concept — which anyone can use, BTW — is a feature that will work without the user even needing to see the display (even though there will be a circular counter on the display once initiated). It would work by simply running a finger in a circular pattern on the the center ares of the Lock Screen to initiate the service. Counterclockwise for dimmer and clockwise for brighter. After a full rotation and only adjust by 25% each full rotation after that you can do it quickly without affecting anything else.

 

Ah, and then this gesture could be set for nearly anything! It could be for volume (there you go, iPod-in-the-pocket crowd; now buy a freaking iOS already), it could be for brightness, it could even be a 1/0 state setting (swing around once to turn Wi-Fi off, etc.)


If anyone has a better sightless concept I'm all ears.

 

Move from LED-backlit LCD to QD-displays, removing the sunlight issue. 1tongue.gif

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #39 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Shouldn't the auto-brightness be handling this? I've always found it just a little lacking, myself.

Not until we have implants in our eyes that can tell the device what the perceived brightness is there is no way for it to know.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #40 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

 

Bingo. This happened to my family a few months back. My wife bought a few books for my 5 year old and handed the iPad back to her, a few days later we get an iTunes receipt for $250.  Kiddo clicked on an ad in a game and wound up purchasing another app.

 

Apple refunded the money and we learned a lesson, but the default should be to the most secure option. Kids are kids. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

I highly suspect that those slamming the parents, don't have any young kids of their own.

 

The IAP thing happened to us last year.  Wife downloaded a game, gave the iPad to our daughter, ended up with $250 of purchases within minutes.    Fully expecting to pay for this mistake, we wrote Apple to simply ask how to prevent it in the future.  Apple voluntarily responded that they would remove the charges and sent a form email with instructions on how to turn off the "feature". 

 

Mind you, our daughter had used Android tablets for years before this... without any problem.  (She had preferred them because of all the online kid's apps that were based on Flash.)   Such games almost always have fake money to buy game options, and kids get used to that.

 

So we thought we doing good when we let her use an iPad instead, after she had expressed an interest in Apple products as she got older.  We figured that Apple, of all companies, would not have a system that was less kid and parent friendly than Android. 

 

It's heavily ironic that people will promote Apple's products as "they just work", and the iPad as "usable by even babies", and then turn around and claim buyers should know about every setting menu, in order to turn off something that should've been off by default in the first place.

 

Wow, so you both ended up with exactly the same scenario's AND exactly $250 worth of purchases.

 

Maybe you should suggest your bosses update the whiteboards you are copying these scripts off.

 

Feel free to enlighten us with an exact breakdown of this "$250", screenshots of your iTunes purchase history will help.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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